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Bob & Lois Catterall

Name: Robert W. Catterall and Lois H. Catterall (Bob & Lois)

Birth Date or Year (optional): 11/5/1927

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I came to Issaquah to work in 1958. My maternal grandparents came to Seattle in 1894.  My mother was born here. She and I both attended Interlake Grade School, Alexander Hamilton Jr. High and Lincoln High School.

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it? 

A job opportunity. I was working for a large corporation and they transferred us to Louisville, KY. I hated it. My brother in law Jerry Houghton was working at the Rowley Agency and let us know real estate was booming. Lois and I move back home. I got what I thought would be a temporary job, but I prospered and liked the work. My first day on the job I sold a home on Alder Street, $12,500. The commission was $750 less listing fee and brokerage fee. I got about $340.00 and the seller was Mr. And Mrs. Park Farrington; buyers Jack and JoAnne Barker. I love em to this day.

Family History in Issaquah:

Our history is short but we are making history. Our 3 children live here, our 6 grandchildren live here, our 2 great-grandchildren live here.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Arrived in Issaquah in 1958 at age 32.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I knew Minnie when she was retired and she was interesting and interested.  She gave Harriet Fish in depth interviews.  Mory Budzius I have known in retirement and if he taught as well as he retired he must have been dynamite.  Every year for a long time he has put together Salmon Days Parade. He announced varsity basketball. He sells products at the Kingdome and Safeco Field. Everyplace you go, there’s Marty.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Out on U.S. 10 (now Gilman Boulevard) there were a strong of little businesses. Don’s Quick Stop was a small independent convenience store. On the corner of Gilman Boulevard and Juniper Street (now the site of Innervisions) was an old abandoned signal service station.  It was operated by Larry Bernard and destroyed by fire.  I rehabilitated this building into my first real estate office – Eastside Realty Inc.  One flaw to the building: it did not have a hoist, instead had a lube pit.  Once the flooring gave way and a desk and salesperson went into the pit. No injuries/no lawsuit/lots of laughs.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Mr. Lewis was my barber sometimes. The time it took to cut your hair depended on how his fishing trip went. The longer his stories, the longer the cut, the shorter your hair. His shop was on Sunset Way, close to Hepler Motors.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Lewis Hardware was and is my hardware store of choice.  The atmosphere and people fit me fine. I marvel at the volume of inventory and they know where it is.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Our early shopping was at the Hi-Lo.  We were close to George and Jean Plant til their death. Marj Sweeny had the sandwich bar and then came George and Marj Miller with “Georgie Porgie Goodie Factory,” later to become Puget Sound Baking Company.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

The Shamrock was my all-time favorite. Rena and Mike Shane did a swell job. No one has come close to Rena’s meringue pie. Marie Calendar, eat your heart out. June Ginger and her girls waited tables. Fasano’s on Sunset Way was a good spot.  The Honeysuckle was a fine fountain, but lots of kids.  Harry’s Drive In was lots of fun when Pat Bebee was cooking and Rhonda Nyberg waited tables.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Did then/do now. My favorite is English toffee. Once I asked Julius how come his peanut brittle was so expensive. Safeway had it for 98 cents and he charged $1.50. I got a long lecture on quality and the value of butter.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I have not drank for 20 years but… when Bill Flintoft was Mayor we would sometimes go to Fasano’s for a  little drink and review the Council meeting we had just attended. Our table usually consisted of George Rowley, Clint Morrow, Bill MacPhearson, E.M. Greenwood and myself.  By the time we got home we had all of the problems solved.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

I have always shopped the Grange. We live on a 5 acre mini farm and keep animals of one kind or another. So chicken food, alfalfa, grain are part of our shopping list. We get our fuel oil there. I don’t think they ever recovered from the strike. About 10 years ago they had fantastic long term employees. No so anymore. The good news is its fun to have a place to buy spring chickens, rabbits and geese.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Mr. and Mrs. Lawill were quiet refined people who ran a clean and very professional store. They lived in a modest little house on Sunset Way.  They owned a beautiful 20 acre tract of land just north of Providence Point Road.  Sometime in the late 60’s they sold their modest little home to Bev and Bob White and built a very glamorous ultra contemporary home. It made me see a new side to the Lawill’s. They were bold and adventurous people.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Bill Flintoft was a real character. He ran the City with an iron hand with the help of Doris McGinn, City Clerk, and Karen Scott, who took care of water bills, and Nogs Seil, City Engineer. There was a City Council and Planning Commission. There was efficiency in government. How many people are full-time City employees now?

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

How about the time the fire station caught on fire? Investigation indicated one of the volunteers had a problem with fire.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

I guess the only change that bothered me was changing Mill Street to Sunset Way. I think I was bothered because Harriet Fish told me I should be.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I have been a volunteer in Labor Day and Salmon Days since I came to town. The big year was when we put the parade together. The low point was the garbage detail. For a very long time I have announced the parade. Its made me a big shot in my grandchildren’s eyes. Some of the entrants that are missed are Susan Bell and her Arab horse. She was dressed in veils like a princess and her horse with a ton of silver tack; Debbi Galli and her 4-H group; Chick Hollenbeck and his posse.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

One year there was a carnival in the Front Street Market parking lot. The fellow that ran the Ferris wheel was found to be selling abusive substances to the teenagers. They were not invited back

Another carnival came to town in July and they set up their tent where Heritage Square is now. To publicize the event they had an elephant race down Front Street. The 3 jockeys were Leon Kos, Ernie Smith and Bob Catterall. I swear I won but I’m not sure if that is a unanimous decision.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Labor Days had a bit of a rough side to it. The taverns seemed to garner a bit more than their fair share of business. There were some barroom brawls and chances are a fire would break out.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Labor Days had a queen. The queen was selected by who sold the most tickets to support a particular candidate. The Princess and her court would ride in an open vehicle in the parade.

Salmon Days involved a new event, the Miss Issaquah Scholarship Pageant. Silvia Werkau started the program and the Junior Chamber of Commerce was the sponsor. Our Queen was Joyce K. Stepaniuk. She went to Vancouver to win the Miss Washington title. She rode in her convertible with the custom plates Miss Wash. She went on to Atlantic City. Another year our first runner up was Missy Spencer and she went on to compete in the Miss SeaFair Pageant and won that title. After the first year the Pageant was sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. For about 2 years Marg Anderson was Executive Director. After Marg came Bev White and she was the dynamo that put Issaquah pageant on the map. One year Jennifer Wall became Queen and she went on to Miss Washington and placed in the Top 10 at Atlantic City. She was beautiful, smart and talented (piano and voice) and she was severely hearing impaired. At her last pageant she sang her signature song vocally and signing. There was not a dry eye in the house. Another Miss Issaquah that went on to Miss Wash was Sharon Dean. Bev and Bob White are still very active at a state level. I was the Master of Ceremonies for all but about 2 of the pageants.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Our family lives on 5 acres on the Plateau. When the kids were young we did lots of horse back riding and had miles of trails we could ride from Issaquah to Redmond and never cross a fence and very few roads. We would ride the gas lines and power lines. We could ride east to Preston/Fall City and west to Lake Sammamish.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Lake Alice was our favorite fishing spot. We would blow up our rubber raft and float around using a worm and bobber. We’d come home with a mess of trout.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

We didn’t use Vasa Park much but if the public boat launch is too busy we use the one at Vasa Park.  All of our kids and grandkids have enjoyed the Sambica summer camps.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

I have known Dave and Nancy Horrocks for many years. Many times Dave took me on walks over the farm and speaking to his childhood there. Nancy would serve cookies and a cup of coffee with real cream from their own cow. They have a fine memory of local history.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I knew Red Hall and Lloyd Harper and the mill.  As a real estate agent I was involved with the sale of his house on Bush Street. The Harpers bought 3 or 4 homes from me and they had 6 or 7 kids and I served as their agent when they bought homes.  They were diamonds in the rough.

Fritz Pearson had a portable saw mill and he did a lot of custom cutting. He was also a mushroom hunter of distinction. He would bring me sacks of morels. He knew High Point like the palm of his hand and if you took a hike in the woods with Fritz, you had a workout. He was fast!

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It was a great asset when built and even more so now. I’m sure it has been a political football.  Whenever the state proposes a budget cut for the State Dept. of Fisheries, the Dept. puts out a press release “Budget Cut Forces Closure of Issaquah Hatchery.”  We all caravan to Olympia to protest, the state increases the budget and the hatchery survives.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

By the time I got here in 1954, it was tough to make a living milking cows. The farmers wanted to sell.  There were three major farms along I-90 (US 10). Elvin and Clara Barlow had 69 acres. The Bergsma family had 90 acres and the Pickering Family had the largest of the farms.  As a real estate person, I put together a group and we purchased the Barlow farm. We subdivided and resold the property. The State Park ended up with the 39 acres on the Lake north of I-90. The only piece ever built on is the Sammamish Club site. George Rowley bought the Bergsma Farm. He also bought the 10 acres from the Wallace Family. The exit 15 clover leaf and its extension south connecting to the Issaquah/Renton Road and the creation of Gilman Boulevard really enhanced his purchase. We all know the saga of the Pickering Farm.

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It gave us our signature street, Gilman Boulevard.  Prior to I-90, one could drive from Seattle to Spokane and there were 3 stoplights. The first one was intersection of US 10 and Front Street, the second North Bend, and the third Ellensburg.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I bought several cars from Gil Abbot at Stonebridge and one from Jerry Malone. Also bought a Buick from Dale Larson out on US 10.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I was a long-time member of the Issaquah Kiwanis.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Sometime in the 60’s Lois and I bought the Issaquah Theater.  At the time it was rumored that someone was going to buy the theater and turn it into a warehouse. Seemed like a bad idea to us.  With our purchase came Mr. Taylor.  He was an elderly man with much experience. The theater served as a babysitter. Sometimes these spirited youth threw eggs or tomatoes at the silver screen, so Mr. Taylor would occasionally frisk a patron. His “pat down” often broke an egg or tomato in a pocket.

Upon Mr. Taylor’s retirement Bob Gray and the Pine Lake Presbyterian Church took over.  With all volunteer labor they extensively remodeled the building and cleaned it up.  In the process they found a old hand-painted fire screen all rolled up and very well preserved.  The central theme was Mt. Rainier. The border were ads by various merchants.  This screen was made about 1914 and Lewis Hardware was one of the advertisers. Another advertiser was selling special bottle water with many curative powers, including curing venereal disease. We donated this screen to the Historical Museum. Sometime it might be interesting to hang it at the Community Center.

 

Front Street

In 1964 I was President of the Chamber. My two projects:

1.   Sent a survey to all residents to see what things they saw to make Issaquah a better place. Answer: do something to ease traffic on Front Street. (With the money spent on traffic studies they could have corrected the problem).

2.   We had been a few years without X-mas decorations so we raised money for candy cane and bows with lights.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Bob Gray and the Pine Lake Presbyterian Church were my favorite group. They were very directed toward community service, one of their projects was the operation of the Theater. It was all volunteer labor and the proceeds went to satisfy needs or less fortunate in our community. After Bob retired because of poor health, they could never find a leader with the same vision.

 

Additional Memories

Do you remember Helen Settem, affectionately known as Cow Helen?

I was for 41 years a real estate man in Issaquah. 6 years I worked for the Rowley Agency and 35 years as the founder, broker and President of Eastside Realty, Inc. It offered me a wonderful life. I worked with a  lot of great people. I formed strong personal relationships with many clients. The business was good to me. I sold the business in 1996. We were located at 160 NW Gilman Boulevard where we have about 2 acres on which I raise sheep. My building is the old Mar Si Motel remodeled into business suites. My wife and I try to return to the community some of the bounty we have received.\

Name:

Robert W. Catterall and Lois H. Catterall (Bob & Lois)

 

Birth Date or Year (optional): 11/5/1927

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I came to Issaquah to work in 1958. My maternal grandparents came to Seattle in 1894.  My mother was born here. She and I both attended Interlake Grade School, Alexander Hamilton Jr. High and Lincoln High School.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

A job opportunity. I was working for a large corporation and they transferred us to Louisville, KY. I hated it. My brother in law Jerry Houghton was working at the Rowley Agency and let us know real estate was booming. Lois and I move back home. I got what I thought would be a temporary job, but I prospered and liked the work. My first day on the job I sold a home on Alder Street, $12,500. The commission was $750 less listing fee and brokerage fee. I got about $340.00 and the seller was Mr. And Mrs. Park Farrington; buyers Jack and JoAnne Barker. I love em to this day.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Our history is short but we are making history. Our 3 children live here, our 6 grandchildren live here, our 2 great-grandchildren live here.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Arrived in Issaquah in 1958 at age 32.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I knew Minnie when she was retired and she was interesting and interested.  She gave Harriet Fish in depth interviews.  Mory Budzius I have known in retirement and if he taught as well as he retired he must have been dynamite.  Every year for a long time he has put together Salmon Days Parade. He announced varsity basketball. He sells products at the Kingdome and Safeco Field. Everyplace you go, there’s Marty.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Out on U.S. 10 (now Gilman Boulevard) there were a strong of little businesses. Don’s Quick Stop was a small independent convenience store. On the corner of Gilman Boulevard and Juniper Street (now the site of Innervisions) was an old abandoned signal service station.  It was operated by Larry Bernard and destroyed by fire.  I rehabilitated this building into my first real estate office – Eastside Realty Inc.  One flaw to the building: it did not have a hoist, instead had a lube pit.  Once the flooring gave way and a desk and salesperson went into the pit. No injuries/no lawsuit/lots of laughs.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Mr. Lewis was my barber sometimes. The time it took to cut your hair depended on how his fishing trip went. The longer his stories, the longer the cut, the shorter your hair. His shop was on Sunset Way, close to Hepler Motors.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Lewis Hardware was and is my hardware store of choice.  The atmosphere and people fit me fine. I marvel at the volume of inventory and they know where it is.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Our early shopping was at the Hi-Lo.  We were close to George and Jean Plant til their death. Marj Sweeny had the sandwich bar and then came George and Marj Miller with “Georgie Porgie Goodie Factory,” later to become Puget Sound Baking Company.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

The Shamrock was my all-time favorite. Rena and Mike Shane did a swell job. No one has come close to Rena’s meringue pie. Marie Calendar, eat your heart out. June Ginger and her girls waited tables. Fasano’s on Sunset Way was a good spot.  The Honeysuckle was a fine fountain, but lots of kids.  Harry’s Drive In was lots of fun when Pat Bebee was cooking and Rhonda Nyberg waited tables.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Did then/do now. My favorite is English toffee. Once I asked Julius how come his peanut brittle was so expensive. Safeway had it for 98 cents and he charged $1.50. I got a long lecture on quality and the value of butter.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I have not drank for 20 years but… when Bill Flintoft was Mayor we would sometimes go to Fasano’s for a  little drink and review the Council meeting we had just attended. Our table usually consisted of George Rowley, Clint Morrow, Bill MacPhearson, E.M. Greenwood and myself.  By the time we got home we had all of the problems solved.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

I have always shopped the Grange. We live on a 5 acre mini farm and keep animals of one kind or another. So chicken food, alfalfa, grain are part of our shopping list. We get our fuel oil there. I don’t think they ever recovered from the strike. About 10 years ago they had fantastic long term employees. No so anymore. The good news is its fun to have a place to buy spring chickens, rabbits and geese.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Mr. and Mrs. Lawill were quiet refined people who ran a clean and very professional store. They lived in a modest little house on Sunset Way.  They owned a beautiful 20 acre tract of land just north of Providence Point Road.  Sometime in the late 60’s they sold their modest little home to Bev and Bob White and built a very glamorous ultra contemporary home. It made me see a new side to the Lawill’s. They were bold and adventurous people.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Bill Flintoft was a real character. He ran the City with an iron hand with the help of Doris McGinn, City Clerk, and Karen Scott, who took care of water bills, and Nogs Seil, City Engineer. There was a City Council and Planning Commission. There was efficiency in government. How many people are full-time City employees now?

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

How about the time the fire station caught on fire? Investigation indicated one of the volunteers had a problem with fire.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

I guess the only change that bothered me was changing Mill Street to Sunset Way. I think I was bothered because Harriet Fish told me I should be.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I have been a volunteer in Labor Day and Salmon Days since I came to town. The big year was when we put the parade together. The low point was the garbage detail. For a very long time I have announced the parade. Its made me a big shot in my grandchildren’s eyes. Some of the entrants that are missed are Susan Bell and her Arab horse. She was dressed in veils like a princess and her horse with a ton of silver tack; Debbi Galli and her 4-H group; Chick Hollenbeck and his posse.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

One year there was a carnival in the Front Street Market parking lot. The fellow that ran the Ferris wheel was found to be selling abusive substances to the teenagers. They were not invited back

 

Another carnival came to town in July and they set up their tent where Heritage Square is now. To publicize the event they had an elephant race down Front Street. The 3 jockeys were Leon Kos, Ernie Smith and Bob Catterall. I swear I won but I’m not sure if that is a unanimous decision.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Labor Days had a bit of a rough side to it. The taverns seemed to garner a bit more than their fair share of business. There were some barroom brawls and chances are a fire would break out.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Labor Days had a queen. The queen was selected by who sold the most tickets to support a particular candidate. The Princess and her court would ride in an open vehicle in the parade.

 

Salmon Days involved a new even, the Miss Issaquah Scholarship Pageant. Silvia Werkau started the program and the Junior Chamber of Commerce was the sponsor. Our Queen was Joyce K. Stepaniuk. She went to Vancouver to win the Miss Washington title. She rode in her convertible with the custom plates Miss Wash. She went on to Atlantic City. Another year our first runner up was Missy Spencer and she went on to compete in the Miss SeaFair Pageant and won that title. After the first year the Pageant was sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. For about 2 years Marg Anderson was Executive Director. After Marg came Bev White and she was the dynamo that put Issaquah pageant on the map. One year Jennifer Wall became Queen and she went on to Miss Washington and placed in the Top 10 at Atlantic City. She was beautiful, smart and talented (piano and voice) and she was severely hearing impaired. At her last pageant she sang her signature song vocally and signing. There was not a dry eye in the house. Another Miss Issaquah that went on to Miss Wash was Sharon Dean. Bev and Bob White are still very active at a state level. I was the Master of Ceremonies for all but about 2 of the pageants.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Our family lives on 5 acres on the Plateau. When the kids were young we did lots of horse back riding and had miles of trails we could ride from Issaquah to Redmond and never cross a fence and very few roads. We would ride the gas lines and power lines. We could ride east to Preston/Fall City and west to Lake Sammamish.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Lake Alice was our favorite fishing spot. We would blow up our rubber raft and float around using a worm and bobber. We’d come home with a mess of trout.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

We didn’t use Vasa Park much but if the public boat launch is too busy we use the one at Vasa Park.  All of our kids and grandkids have enjoyed the Sambica summer camps.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

I have known Dave and Nancy Horrocks for many years. Many times Dave took me on walks over the farm and speaking to his childhood there. Nancy would serve cookies and a cup of coffee with real cream from their own cow. They have a fine memory of local history.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I knew Red Hall and Lloyd Harper and the mill.  As a real estate agent I was involved with the sale of his house on Bush Street. The Harpers bought 3 or 4 homes from me and they had 6 or 7 kids and I served as their agent when they bought homes.  They were diamonds in the rough.

 

Fritz Pearson had a portable saw mill and he did a lot of custom cutting. He was also a mushroom hunter of distinction. He would bring me sacks of morels. He knew High Point like the palm of his hand and if you took a hike in the woods with Fritz, you had a workout. He was fast!

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It was a great asset when built and even more so now. I’m sure it has been a political football.  Whenever the state proposes a budget cut for the State Dept. of Fisheries, the Dept. puts out a press release “Budget Cut Forces Closure of Issaquah Hatchery.”  We all caravan to Olympia to protest, the state increases the budget and the hatchery survives.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

By the time I got here in 1954, it was tough to make a living milking cows. The farmers wanted to sell.  There were three major farms along I-90 (US 10). Elvin and Clara Barlow had 69 acres. The Bergsma family had 90 acres and the Pickering Family had the largest of the farms.  As a real estate person, I put together a group and we purchased the Barlow farm. We subdivided and resold the property. The State Park ended up with the 39 acres on the Lake north of I-90. The only piece ever built on is the Sammamish Club site. George Rowley bought the Bergsma Farm. He also bought the 10 acres from the Wallace Family. The exit 15 clover leaf and its extension south connecting to the Issaquah/Renton Road and the creation of Gilman Boulevard really enhanced his purchase. We all know the saga of the Pickering Farm.

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It gave us our signature street, Gilman Boulevard.  Prior to I-90, one could drive from Seattle to Spokane and there were 3 stoplights. The first one was intersection of US 10 and Front Street, the second North Bend, and the third Ellensburg.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I bought several cars from Gil Abbot at Stonebridge and one from Jerry Malone. Also bought a Buick from Dale Larson out on US 10.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I was a long-time member of the Issaquah Kiwanis.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Sometime in the 60’s Lois and I bought the Issaquah Theater.  At the time it was rumored that someone was going to buy the theater and turn it into a warehouse. Seemed like a bad idea to us.  With our purchase came Mr. Taylor.  He was an elderly man with much experience. The theater served as a babysitter. Sometimes these spirited youth threw eggs or tomatoes at the silver screen, so Mr. Taylor would occasionally frisk a patron. His “pat down” often broke an egg or tomato in a pocket.

 

Upon Mr. Taylor’s retirement Bob Gray and the Pine Lake Presbyterian Church took over.  With all volunteer labor they extensively remodeled the building and cleaned it up.  In the process they found a old hand-painted fire screen all rolled up and very well preserved.  The central theme was Mt. Rainier. The border were ads by various merchants.  This screen was made about 1914 and Lewis Hardware was one of the advertisers. Another advertiser was selling special bottle water with many curative powers, including curing venereal disease. We donated this screen to the Historical Museum. Sometime it might be interesting to hang it at the Community Center.

 

Front Street

In 1964 I was President of the Chamber. My two projects:

 

1.   Sent a survey to all residents to see what things they saw to make Issaquah a better place. Answer: do something to ease traffic on Front Street. (With the money spent on traffic studies they could have corrected the problem).

 

2.   We had been a few years without X-mas decorations so we raised money for candy cane and bows with lights.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Bob Gray and the Pine Lake Presbyterian Church were my favorite group. They were very directed toward community service, one of their projects was the operation of the Theater. It was all volunteer labor and the proceeds went to satisfy needs or less fortunate in our community. After Bob retired because of poor health, they could never find a leader with the same vision.

 

Additional Memories

Do you remember Helen Settem, affectionately known as Cow Helen?

 

I was for 41 years a real estate man in Issaquah. 6 years I worked for the Rowley Agency and 35 years as the founder, broker and President of Eastside Realty, Inc. It offered me a wonderful life. I worked with a  lot of great people. I formed strong personal relationships with many clients. The business was good to me. I sold the business in 1996. We were located at 160 NW Gilman Boulevard where we have about 2 acres on which I raise sheep. My building is the old Mar Si Motel remodeled into business suites. My wife and I try to return to the community some of the bounty we have received.

Back to the Memory Books

Jean & Chuck Cerar

Names: Charles D. Cerar & Jean M. Cerar

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

We moved to Issaquah in early February 1972. We have remained in the same house since then and have raised two children, Joanna and Jonathan, who both went all the way through the Issaquah School system.

Jean has been involved with the Volunteers for Issaquah Schools, Camp Fire at Issaquah Valley Elementary and Hans Jensen day camp, Cub Scouts at Issaquah Valley and the PTA at Issaquah Valley, Issaquah Middle School and Issaquah High School.

Charlie was involved with Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Camp Fire.

Both Jean and Charlie were members of the Issaquah Residents for Environmental Quality and currently volunteer for the Issaquah Historical Society.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

We liked the small town feel of Issaquah and the fact that it was a distinct community even though it was close to a major metropolitan area. It turned out to be a good place to raise a family and we have made many good friends here over the years.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

We did not attend Issaquah High School, but our children did. For Joanna (Class of 1992), the most influential teacher was Joe Peterson, who taught history and government and was an early supporter of the Issaquah Historical Society. For Jonathan (Class of 1996), the most influential teachers were Doug Longman, orchestra, and Jeff Dineen, biology.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Coast-to-Coast Hardware, located first in the Gilman Shopping Center near what is now the antique mall and then in the Meadows shopping center, was one of our favorites. The owners were always so friendly and helpful. Over the years we bought a wide variety of items, including paint and our first gas barbecue.

Villa Auto Parts behind KFC was a favorite. Con and Elmer were the friendly guys behind the counter of this old-fashioned, bar-stool auto parts store.

For many years Issaquah had two wonderful, locally owned pharmacies, Issaquah Rexall owned by Richard Seek, and Look’s Pharmacy, owned by Robert Look. The fact that Look and Seek operated the businesses led to some waggish comments from time to time.

Highway 10 Lumber, a small lumber store, used to be on what is now Gilman Boulevard where Auto Tech is now located.

Prairie Market used to occupy the building just to the west of Burger King. It was one of Issaquah’s early warehouse-style grocery businesses.

City Lights, operated by Alan Ligda, was a wonderful business. It was Issaquah’s first video rental store and there wasn’t much Alan didn’t know about movies. City Lights occupied two locations in the strip mall just south of Front Street Market.

When we moved here in 1972, the only auto dealer in town was a Chevrolet dealership just to the east of XXX on Gilman Boulevard. It went out of business soon afterwards and there was no dealership in town until Evergreen Ford arrived in the 90s.– Charles & Jean Cerar

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

I preferred Gene’s Barbershop on Front Street N., although I did have my hair cut a couple of times by a barber who opened a shop in Issaquah and was later convicted of murder and dumping the victim’s body in Lake Sammamish.

 

Our son got his first haircut at Frank’s Barbershop next to Front Street Market in 1980.– Charles Cerar

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

The small town feel of Lewis Hardware has always been its greatest appeal for us. Over the years we have purchased nuts, bolts, miscellaneous painting supplies, fishing licenses and an assortment of items one wouldn’t expect to find in a small store. The creaky wood floors and the back entrance through the supply area are particularly memorable.– Charles & Jean Cerar

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Over the past 30 years I think I have shopped in all of the grocery stores located in Issaquah. In that time the Thriftway on Front Street S. has become the Front Street Market and Safeway has moved through three locations (Front Street N. where Stars is now located, Town and Country Shopping Center where G.I. Joe’s is now located, and its current location in the Commons at Issaquah).

During the 1970s I did much of my shopping at the grocery store located in the Gilman Shopping Center where the antique store now stands. The bakery operated by the Miller family opened in that store. Marge Miller always had a cookie ready for the kids riding in the shopping carts.

For a time I also shopped at Prairie Market, where customers picked the merchandise off of warehouse shelves, marked it with a wax marker and bagged the groceries themselves. It was a small-scale precursor of Costco.– Jean Cerar

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

During the 1970s we ate out at the Foothills Restaurant on Gilman Blvd., Fasano’s on Front Street N. (now the Shanghai Garden) and Pick’s (now Las Margaritas). McDonald’s arrived on Gilman Blvd., at about the same time our children were ready for Happy Meals. When Andy Wang opened the Mandarin Garden on E. Sunset, he introduced us to spicy Sichuan food. Our taste buds have never been the same.– Charles & Jean Cerar

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

It didn’t take us long to discover Boehm’s Candies after we moved to Issaquah in 1972. Mr. Boehm was often behind the counter, where the price for each variety was posted on a handwritten cardboard chart next to the cast register. Your totals were all worked out on paper; there wasn’t a calculator in sight. Our favorites have included turtles, nuts and chews, peanut clusters. Almost anything, really.

When our daughter was a preschooler, she was often invited behind the counter by Rae Pickering, who would give her a piece of candy and tell her she would give her a job at Boehm’s whenever she was ready. As it turned out, our daughter worked other places in Issaquah while she was in high school, but some of her friends worked at Boehm’s, which has provided employment for generations of Issaquah’s young people.– Jean Cerar

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Although we didn’t frequent the place, we (along with most other residents of the Issaquah Valley and Squak Mountain) well remember the summer night in the mid-1970s when the Waterhole Tavern went sky high. The booms from the explosions echoed all over the area and had people sitting straight up in bed. Of course, we didn’t know what had exploded, but I found out the next morning when I went shopping at the grocery store in the Gilman Shopping Center where the antique mall is now located. The Waterhole, which had been just to the east of the store, was reduced to a heap of scorched rubble. The area was roped off with crime scene tape and was crawling with ATF agents. News reports said the owner could not be located. I believe he was later found in Alaska and convicted of arson.– Jean Cerar

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

It was such an unusual event that Issaquah made the national news when it recalled members of the Issaquah School Board in the late 1970s. As I recall, among other things the very conservative board had moved to ban some books and to affect the teaching of evolution in science classes. A group of concerned citizens began to monitor all board actions and eventually built a case for “malfeasance and misfeasance in office.”

The recall became such a topic of conversation in education circles, that when a friend of mine, who was attending a convention in Texas, happened to mention in an elevator that she was from Issaquah, half the people in the car turned to her and said, “Tell us about the recall!” It turned out that they were educators attending another conference in the same hotel.– Jean Cerar

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Salmon Days has been a major event for our family for the past 30 years. The parades in the 70s were home town affairs that seemed to consist of fire engines, kids in strollers, political candidates in vintage cars, high school bands and the occasional float. The parade went down Front Street between the booths. As the event grew, other parade standouts included the Seafair Pirates scraping their swords on the street to terrify folks and many units from the Nile Shrine – particularly the Oriental Band that used to repair to the H&H Tavern to jam and recover after the parade. Ivar Haglund was the parade marshal one year.

 

During the 1980s our children had a great time participating in the parade with their Camp Fire and Cub Scout groups. For several years Evergreen Mobile, which was located in Issaquah at the time, provided a large float for Camp Fire.– Charles and Jean Cerar

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Not a particular year, but the decade of the 80s when our kids were in the parade because of Camp Fire, Cub Scouts, or the Issaquah High School Drill Team. One of the reasons our daughter wanted to join Camp Fire was because she had seen Camp Fire kids in the parade and she wanted to get in on the fun.– Charles and Jean Cerar

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

In the early days, Salmon Days was a community event that included a simple parade and the last street fair of the season for craftsmen and artists. It was family oriented. It has grown beyond all expectations. Every year we vow that this is the last time we will go and fight the crowds. However, the next year always seems to find us down on Front Street applauding parade entries and perusing the booths.– Charles and Jean Cerar

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

For a brief time, an outside art fair was held over the Memorial Day weekend, I think. The Fourth of July celebrations have been fun – they have the feel of the early Salmon Days celebrations.

The openings of the library on Memorial Field and the Post Office on Gilman Boulevard were special events.

Camp Fire members used to plant flowers in public places each year in honor of Arbor Day. Alan Haywood directed the Arbor Day plantings in front of the library just days after coming to Issaquah as the city horticulturist.– Charles and Jean Cerar

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

The Lake Tradition area was our favorite hiking spot when the kids were young. Our son even went cross country skiing there with his Boy Scout troop one winter.–  Charles and Jean Cerar

 

Salmon Hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

The salmon hatchery has made Issaquah the destination for those interested in the life cycle of the salmon and its effects on the environment. And of course, the hatchery has become a prime destination for Salmon Days attendees. Threats to the continued existence of the hatchery brought together a unique coalition of concerned citizens as Friends of the Issaquah Hatchery, or F.I.S.H. Continued improvements to the hatchery only enhance its status as a center for education and a unique centerpiece for a suburban town.– Charles & Jean Cerar

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

At first, the construction of I-90 sucked the life out of the old Highway 10, the road destined to become Gilman Boulevard. Starting with Gilman Village, businesses began to spring up along the boulevard – especially after the traffic made it so difficult to get to the businesses in the old downtown Issaquah area.

The freeway tended to divide the valley into north and south halves. For some time development plans discouraged or prohibited construction on the north side, where the Issaquah airfield and the Pickering Barn were located. The airfield was home to a thriving skydiving and glider operation. It was also very close to the freeway. Those who wanted to see the airfield closed to make way for development loudly pointed out the safety issues involved with aircraft making low approaches over the freeway and with skydivers who occasionally missed the target on the field and landed on or near the freeway. Eventually the pro-development voices prevailed. The field was closed and Pickering Place was built. — Charles & Jean Cerar

 

Front Street

The Front and Sunset area of downtown Issaquah, with the exception of the new library and the new Village Theatre, looks much the same as it did when we moved here in 1972. However, many of the buildings that housed mercantile businesses now house restaurants. When we got here, the Front and Sunset intersection was a four-way stop where everyone indulged in a little game of chicken. — Charles & Jean Cerar

 

Additional Memories

The Issaquah Citizens for Environment Quality (I.R.E.Q.) was founded in the 1970s out of concerns about water runoff and development in the Issaquah area. The group monitored Issaquah Council meetings and hosted programs on quality of life issues. The group even ran a brat stand at the hatchery during the 1974 Salmon Days as a fundraiser. I.R.E.Q.’s greatest achievement was the promotion of a strong sign ordinance for Issaquah. The appearance of a tall Ben Franklin sign, followed by an even taller Kentucky Fried Chicken sign, raised fears that it wouldn’t be long before Issaquah resembled Highway 99. As a part of the project I.R.E.Q. members fanned out across town on a wet and windy Saturday to measure and inventory every sign. Volunteers, particularly Bette Hancock, spent hundreds of hours researching sign ordinances from other communities and working with city employees and city council members to draft an ordinance for Issaquah. The fact that the ordinance has been changed very little since its adoption attests to the quality of their work.– Charles & Jean Cerar

 

My first venture into community action was as a member of the Volunteers for Issaquah Schools, the group that still exists to organize school levy and bond campaigns. The district had lost a couple of levies before I became involved in 1979. There was still some voter resistance to the levies. I remember the intensity of the campaigns and the frenzy to see that the measures passed before the district fell further behind financially. At the time I became a volunteer levies had to be voted on every year, which was exhausting for volunteers. The law was changed in the early 1980s to allow school districts to present levies every two years.

During the 1970s Issaquah was home to a thriving babysitting co-op. The moms involved traded hours of childcare, which were carefully tracked through a central bookkeeping system. Most of the women in the co-op had left careers to become stay-at-home moms. Many had no experience with child rearing and little connection with the community. In addition to providing babysitting, the co-op became a support group for many of us. Many of my best friends are women I met through the co-op and the children I knew best as my children went through school were those I had babysat as toddlers.

For a number of years the home economics department at Issaquah High School operated Pooh’s Place, a preschool in which high school students taught under the supervision of their teachers. The little kid students thought their big kid teachers were just great. Because high school students ran it, graduation was a big deal at Pooh’s Place. The young graduates wore red robes and mortar boards and participated in a ceremony on the stage of the school’s Little Theater. I can still remember the shock of walking into the theater in 1979 and seeing the banner, “Congratulations Class of 1992.” It seemed so far away, but somehow it turned out it wasn’t. — Jean Cerar

 

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Charles D. Cerar & Jean M. Cerar           April 6, 2001

Ted Cowan

Name: Ted Cowan

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Since 1949.

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

My folks lived here.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I owned seven and a half acres.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

None.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Wasn’t Minnie Schomber the Secretary of the town council?

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

The café on the front cover—good food at a right price.  Large dish of  ice cream for ten cents.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

The shop east of Hepler Ford.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

All hunting and fishing stuff.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony Walen and Johnny Hircko’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Yes!!

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes and Yes.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

XXX used to be east of Stonebridge Chevrolet agency…..now a body shop.

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Julius Boehm taught my two daughters to swim.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

None.

 

What do you remember about Grange Mercantile?

They had freezer lockers.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

We said Mayor Flintoft would always win in the end.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Our family, Mom, Dad, my Brother and I, had a picnic every Sunday evening.  A fireplace fire, no electric lights, roasting hot dogs and marshmallows and had hot spice cider.  All to save money, but just for fun as far as I was concerned.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

We moved to Issaquah after the war.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Yes!!

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

Red Hall milled mostly alder (for furniture he sold to eastern manufactories), but also milled some maple burls.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

Joined in 1948 at the request of Bill Christenson, the contractor that built my house.  Floyd Erickson was president.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

We (Issaquah Sportsmen Club) built a small bore rifle range in the Basement.  George Good got the ¼ inch steel plate for back stop.  There was a short range (25 feet) in the basement of Tony Walen and John Hevco’s store (now the Bahá’í office)

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Two or three times.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

The Roadside Chapel four miles south of Issaquah at the Cedar Grove Road.  Pastor Stan started a Sunday School then grew to a full size church.

 

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Ted Cowan                       March 27, 2001

Denny Croston

Name: Denny Croston

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Fifty-five years.  (The most part of.)

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Never wanted to be anyplace else.

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

All Issaquah schools (Grades 1-12).

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Crostons came to Issaquah in the early 1890’s.  I am fourth generation in Issaquah.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

It was a lot of fun and lots of friends that I still get to see from time to time.  I remember when we moved into the new high school in 1962 or 1963.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Never met her.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was out of school in 1965.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played football a couple of years and some baseball in the summer.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We would usually be at ones house or right after school, we would stop by the Honeysuckle (soda fountain).  We were always in some kind of mischief but usually never got caught.  If we got in trouble at school we got swats.

 

Local businesses

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Paul’s Barber shop or Hank’s.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Usually went to Lewis Hardware and still do.  I also remember Wold’s Hardware and later I think it was called Craymers’ Hardware that I worked at for a short time assembling bar-b-ques and lawnmowers.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We shopped at Tony and Johnny’s after but also went to the Grange and later we went to Hi-Low.  I also worked there on Saturdays in the early 1960’s.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes, we shopped there also and had a freezer locker.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

We went to Fasano’s commonly on Friday nights in the 1950’s.  Would frequent others from time to time.

I went to the Honeysuckle after school and do remember go into Drylie’s Soda Shop but he seemed like an unfriendly old guy, so didn’t go there too often.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Hardly ever went there, they were too expensive for my budget.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Been to them all but none better than but the other in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Really never had much need to go there, because we had no farm animals.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I remember that Labor Day Celebration was “the big event” of the year and I always looked forward to it.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

It went from small and fun to big and hard work.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

I remember when Pete Radimaker (heavy-weight boxer) was training in Issaquah for a championship fight.  There was a lot of activity at the old fire-hall, press and T.V. reporters, but he lost the fight.

I will always remember Bill Bergsma as Santa, and milkman.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

When I was young we used to hike around Tiger Mountain and Squak Mountain all the time.  I spent many nights camped up there.  When I was older I always went deer hunting and sometimes one of us would get one.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I fished Issaquah Creek all the time.   And my grandfather (Irven Hynds) lived on the Lake Sammamish, and went fishing for perch (they were plentiful).  Used them for crawdad bait which we caught lots of them to eat.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Vasa Park was a real neat place to swim and play.  Didn’t go there too often because it was too far to walk.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Swam at Lake Sammamish often.  Swam at my grandparents’ house, State Park, and at Alexander’s Park.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

All but Issaquah Lumber.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I remember that the Monohon Mill had fires very often, because my uncle (Roy Croston) was on the fire department.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

I was only there once, but I remember us kids were playing in the hay barn.  When they stacked the bails of hay, they would leave tunnels and chambers in them and it was like crawling around in a maze.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

I worked at Darigold for about seven years in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

As kids we would hop the train and ride it down to the lake to my grandparents on the lake.  After a while the train would make us ride inside and then stop when we wanted to get off.  They said it was too dangerous for us to hop on and off but it sure was exciting riding on a flatcar or boxcar.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was a 1936 Ford pickup that was given to me by my sister.

I later bought a 1954 Ford sedan from Jerry Malone Ford (Helper).

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I was a member of  the Eagles for about 20 years.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I remember we used to go to the turkey raffles during the holiday seasons.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Yes, I went to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss.

Went to the movies almost every Friday night.  My dad gave me a quarter and it cost 20 cents to get in and that left 5 cents for a candy bar.

Back to the Memory Books

Doreen Dalbotten

Doreen Dalbotten (image courtesy of Flintofts Funeral Home).

Doreen Dalbotten (image courtesy of Flintofts Funeral Home).

Name: Doreen Dalbotten

Local Businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Issaquah 10 cent store opened by Maxine & Dean Maulsby 1938 then purchased by Irving & Doreen Dalbotten in 1945. In 1945, Maulsby & Dalbotten purchased Eves Style Shop and changed the name to Dormax Department Store which was derived from the names of Doreen & Maxine.

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Rachel Dilley Darst

Name: Rachel M. Darst

Birth Date or Year (optional): September 13, 1914

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I moved here in 1933.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

I came with my parents.

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I got married to a home town boy.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I did not attend Issaquah High School, but I do remember how kind all the teachers and students were when my youngest brother, Ira Dilley, was injured during a football game at Memorial Field.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie was a sweet friend.  During wartime, it was her job to sign up the boys to go to war.  That must have been so hard since she knew them all, and knew that some of them wouldn’t be coming home.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I had children in school during both of the earthquakes.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Fischer’s Meats is still located on Front Street and still sells great meat.  Brady’s Dry Goods was located on Sunset.  You could buy just about anything there.  Steven’s Grocery was located in the IOOF building.  They even would deliver.  I also remember Dalbotten’s 10cent store, Dormax Clothing Store, and Reg. Thomas’ Furniture Store.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

First I went to Alpha’s.  It was located just north of the Eagles.  After that, I went to Evan’s Salon of Beauty, which was located where part of the Brewhouse is today.  I was Bill’s first customer.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

At Lewis Hardware you could always get what you needed.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We almost always purchased our groceries at Harry and Rae Stevens’ Store.  You could call and they would deliver.  They were very sweet people.  Occasionally we would stop in at Mr. Moser’s Grocery.  He would always have a baked potato cooking on top of his stove.  Later we would sometimes stop at the E & F Market on Front Street.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

The Grange was like a big country store.  Everybody liked it.  It had everything you could want.  We also rented a frozen food locker there.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

My sister owned the Busy Bee.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

I knew the owners of Park Inn and so sometimes we would go in just to chat.  There was a miniature bowling competition there once in which I won $47.00.  That was a lot of money back then!

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Mr. Lawill was a very sweet and quiet man.  Everyone in town liked him.  Mrs. Lawill was very pretty.

 

Local Politics

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

She was the mayor when we first moved here.  All I can remember is that it was a very scandalous time.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

At the time, none of us liked the idea of the change.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

I remember having to pick berries to buy school clothes.  My mom had to go to Olympia to work in the cannery.  I worked at a cannery with my sister in Puyallup.  At least once a week, we ate a big pot of beans and fresh homemade bread.  It was a hard time for all.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

It seemed like everybody had a kid in the war.  I knew boys in the war – they weren’t old enough to be called men.  It affected everyone.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Yes, I knew the only Japanese family around here, the Nagasawa’s.  Everyone loved that family.  They lived by 12th Avenue and they had a pea patch and berry patch that a lot of our young people picked peas and berries in.  As soon as the war started, they had to leave immediately.  They were allowed only one suitcase apiece.  Sadly, they never came back.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

People worked wherever they got a chance, but there were no jobs in Issaquah to be had.  The only jobs possibly brought to the area by the war was Boeing.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

At Labor Day there were always big crowds (they were nothing like the crowds at Salmon Days though), but everyone looked forward to it.  Everyone always picked a lot of berries ahead of time so we would have money to spend.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Every Labor Day was special.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

The parades and carnival were the big events at Labor Day.  It was to me, by far, better than Salmon Days is.  During the first few Salmon Days, only local people sold their wares and it was fun to buy from them.  Over time, Salmon Days has gotten much bigger and turned too much into an arts festival.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

The coming of the airport in Issaquah was very exciting.  The airport stayed here for many years.  The kidnapping of the Weyerhaeuser baby was a tragic event.  Another tragic event was the kidnapping and eventual killing of Issaquah’s Anita Houvar and her husband by bandits in Iran.  Anita’s parents owned a motel where Skippers now stands.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Gardening was fun and picnicking with my family and friends at Alexander’s Beach was always a highlight.  All the men went hunting in the fall.  They would go east of the mountains and stay for a week to ten days.  A neighbor, Al Arndt, would hunt and camp out on the hill and bring back deer and bear.  Quail and pheasant were also common.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

The trout were really big and very plentiful.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Alexander Beach on Lake Sammamish was a favorite.  We also went to Horrock’s once on the Fourth of July for a picnic and swimming.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

My husband worked for a time at Red Hall’s Mill.  My youngest brother owned his own logging company when he was in high school.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I remember all of those mills.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I do remember when it burned.  I didn’t see the fire itself, but I could see the smoke.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

From the time we moved here, my dad worked at the salmon hatchery.  It was beautiful then.  There wasn’t a day that would go by without people lining up to see the fish.  The hatchery was a great creator of tourism.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Yes, we went to Seattle frequently on the bus whether it was to see the doctor, dentist, or just to shop at J. C. Penney.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It really messed up the roads at the time, but after it was completed it was so much easier because you didn’t have to go through Renton to get to Seattle.  I-90 really cut down on time.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I didn’t buy a car at any of these dealerships, but I do remember when my daughter and I were hit by a car while crossing the street by Hepler’s.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I went to some really good dances at the Volunteer Fire Department Hall.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I went to dances, benefit dinners, and wedding receptions at the Grange Meeting Hall.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

I remember having to wash extremely dirty clothes after my husband came home from the mines.  There was nothing like it.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

My husband was a coal miner at the Bianco, Harris, Finn, and Superior Mines.  The miners had to breathe in that awful black coal dust and many of them had permanent coughs.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I saw many cowboy movies there, but the last movie I saw at that theater was Tammy, which I went to see with one of my sisters and my daughter.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Lois Hines was a pastor at Bethel Chapel.  She was always there for everyone and was an incredibly sweet woman.

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Jim Elser

Name:  Jim Elser

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

As a boy around age 8, I remember going to the Grange Mercantile Grocery with my grandfather, a big Irishman named James Filbin.  While he was shopping, I waited for him on the bridge over the creek watching the salmon run.  An elderly couple was also there taking in the show.  A very, very large salmon got hung up on the rocks.  The elderly gent climbed down the bank with great zeal.  All the while his wife is complaining about what he is doing.  He grabbed the salmon with both hands by the tail and pulled him completely into the water.  His wife called him an “Old fool.”

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Yes.  I remember “Hank” well.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I have shopped at Lewis’ since the later 40’s.  I have purchased all typed of items from plumbing to stovepipe.  I’ve really purchased a lot of stovepipe from them to this day.  I remember them all.  Great people.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker? 

Yes, we had a locker there for years.  Had our beef, pigs and deer, butchered and wrapped.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I hung out at all of them.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes.  Loved the Boehm’s chocolates.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I sold arts & crafts at the events 1972, 73 & 74

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there? 

I fished went roller skating at Howard & Ida’s Vasa park rink in 1956.  I was a regular until they left.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I bought my third car from Stonebridge.  A 1954 chevy.

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Eric Erickson with Loretta Cook & Ted Cook III

Eric Erickson

Name:  Eric Erickson

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

During my twelve years in grade and high school the two school buildings were the only schools for all of the school district so you knew everybody from Preston to Coalfield, Hobart, and the Pine Lake Plateau.  Teachers I remember that were influential in my education were Dan Coyle, Fred Frohs, Oscar Faggerness, Gerald Lider, Fuayls Krelly, Chuck Falstrom, Ken Schmelzer.  Teachers in my high school days 1950-1954 did many jobs they were classroom teachers as well as coaches, bus drivers.  Kids that got into minor trouble during school hours were sent to the boiler room where Martin Hanson the Janitor put them to work cleaning the school, moving grass and they had to listen to a sermon as Martin was a church preacher.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie was my father’s first grade school teacher and my fourth grade teacher.  Minnie’s memory was one of the best of anyone I know.  Over the years she could remember every student and person she knew by their first name.  Minnie loved to play bingo and her and I played many games at the Eagle’s Hall.  Many of the teachers that started in Issaquah in the late 1940’s became active in the community and were outstanding in the classroom.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

The 1949 earthquake occurred right at lunchtime and I was standing last in line at the school cafeteria.  Everyone ran out of the cafeteria but as I was a growing boy I was hungry so I went in and ate lunch.  One of out students was injured by falling bricks from the chimney of the old 3 story brick grade school.  During the 1965 earthquake at 8:30 in the morning I was dispatched from the Seattle Water Department for about a ½ hour after the quake all communication systems were out.  Then damage calls started to filter in.  Numerous broken water mains and hundreds of broken water pipes in homes and businesses occurred mostly on Alki Point and the industrial area of Seattle.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

At 6’ tall I was the third tallest high school student and played in the basketball team.  Our center was Nick Kelderman 6’ 8” the tallest player in the state at the time.  Games against our long time rival Mount Si and the larger schools in Bellevue always sold out, as well as games played in the West Central District tournament.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

As a farm boy, most of my free time was spent milking cows, cutting hay, shoveling manure and farm related work activities.  During free time I spent a lot of time climbing and hiking on Squak and Tiger Mountains.

At home more work was the punishment.  At school sent to janitor room for a sermon (only once as once was enough).

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Food- Tony and Johnny’s- First located in the Coutts building, then in their own new store (now the Music shop across from the Eagles-  Tony Walen and John Hircko

Hardware and Sporting Goods- Lewis Hardware- Same location as now- Tom and Ed Lewis

Feed- Hailstone’s Feed Store- Now Greyhound Bus Depot

Grange Supply- same location as now

Shoes- Cussac’s Shoe Store- Fred Cussac – Next to Peter’s Real Estate

Clothes- Brady’s clothing- First store is where Texaco Station on Sunset is.  Second store is Pizza Place next to old Village Theatre.

Ice Cream Soda and Bus Station- Drylies Honeysuckle- sold milkshakes, ice cream, green rivers and was bus station for both Trailways and Greyhound interstate buses and Seattle- North Bend local bus.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

First barbershop was H & H Barber shop inside H & H Tavern had to go into tavern to get to shop until late 1950s when state said minors could not go into tavern to get to barbershop.

Second shop was Paul Benson’s shop located in what is now Mandarin Garden Restaurant.

Third shop was Frank’s Barbershop located next to Front Street Market.  Frank Minerich was owner until he retired a few years ago.

Barbers knew all that was going on in town and knew all the latest stories and tales.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Lewis Hardware had everything you need or they would get what you needed (still a frequent buyer there).  They were also the only space that sold fishing and hunting supplies and knew where the fish were biting.  The store has changed little today from what it was 50 years ago.  As well as owning the store Tom and Ed Lewis were avid hunters and fisherman.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We purchased most of our groceries from Tony and Johnny’s.  One of my favorite clerks (butcher) was A.I. Garner, he always gave every child who came into the store with his parents a hot dog cut of the string of hot dogs (they weren’t prepackaged in those days).  Later we shopped at Safeway at their store across the street from Darigold.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We kept our farm meats in the frozen food lockers at the Grange and berried (hand picked) and vegetables at the frozen food lockers at the Red and White Grocery Store owned by John Kramer and located across Sunset Way from the Grand Central Hotel.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Rena’s Café was owned by Mike and Rena Shain- their son Bill and I played together as we were neighbors.  They lived across the street from my grandfather’s house.  Liked XXX Root Beer and their Hamburgers.  And of course Tom Drylies who owned Drylies’ Honeysuckle located on Front Street where the Mexican Restaurant is now.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Before Boehm’s Candies went in there was Bill’s Bicycle repair shop at the rear of the property, took my bike their several times and bought parts there for my Schwinn balloon tired bike.  Yes bought candies at shop.  Chocolates.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Did not frequent  Except had to go into H & H Tavern to get to barber shop which was in the south east corner of the tavern.

See original for drawing of layout.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

As Hailstone’s, Wold’s, and Keogh’s and other stores that supplied our farm with farm goods we switched to the Grange Supply for our farm needs as well as the purchase of gasoline and heating oils.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Lawill’s was a very small drug store but like Lewis Hardware across the street had everything you needed.  The Lawill’s daughter Charlene started with me in the first grade and graduated from high school with me in 1954 (Issaquah).

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Although I was born at the middle of the depression and of course do not remember much about it, we lived along side of the railroad water tank and a hobo camp existed and was still in use in the 1940-1942 period next to the water tank- these hobo’s were people still out of work and traveling by train.  As a little boy, I talked to them on the way to school as I walked down the tracks to get to grade school which was located where the Junior High is now.

See original for drawing.

Note: Cafeteria is the only remaining building of the school site.  It was moved and became library where the existing library is now located- it was then moved to Newport Way and is the church just north of Fire District 10 Fire Station (Eastside Fire and Rescue).  All the buildings on my father’s place and the RR water tank are all now gone.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

My father worked in the sawmill (Issaquah Lumber Co at Monohon) an essential war industry and served as an air raid warden in Issaquah.  I remember black out curtains on windows, rationing coupons and A,B,C, D, stickers in car windows which allowed certain levels of gasoline purchases depending upon how many riders and other criteria you used care for.  WE were moving on December 7th 1941 and I remember my mother coming out of the house yelling Pearl Harbor has been bombed.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

None from Issaquah.  But in the 1970s one of my secretaries had been sent to camp as a teenager and her family’s farm in south Seattle was taken away.  She met her future husband also a teenager in camp.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

In school

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

We went from a local little area hometown celebrations to the massive Salmon Days celebration of today.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

Of course as a teenager the Labor Day Celebration of the late 1940s and early 1950s were the most impressive- only local businesses and organizations had floats, all home made and many on farm wagons towed by farm tractors.  -Fir and cedar boughs and crepe paper were the most often used materials to decorate- and of course the carnival that came to town and set up on Memorial Field.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

(1)   Carnivals at Labor Days

(2)   City leaders who did not have a beard were arrested and taken to jail in the basement of the town hall (building where police building is).  And had to pay a fine (donation) to fund celebration.  Some mug shots were taken by the press.

(3)   Dances held at Grange Hall and Volunteer Fire Hall.

(4)   Raffles and games of chance held by local fraternal organizations to raise monies.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

Before my time

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

The arrival of the first of the next year’s new car models in the showrooms of car dealers.

The last of the steam trains in Issaquah including on of the Casey Jones specials that stopped to take on water at the RR water tank and they were unable to proceed up the grade towards High Point because it did not have enough power to pull the grade it sat there for several hours until a diesel locomotion arrived and pushed it on its way.

The long standing argument between Issaquah and the Washington State Highway Department about the installation of a stop & go traffic signal at Front and Sunset.  And how long and many accidents that occurred at US 10 and Front before a traffic light was installed there (now Gilman & Front).

The demolition of the high school building following damage by the 1965 earthquake.  My mother was one of the first graduates from the building in 1933.

The Flying Tiger airplane crash in January 1950 2 miles south of town across the Issaquah Hobart Road from where the hang gliders now land.  It occurred during a wind and rain storm.  Plane hit a tree on top of Squak Mountain.  They went straight down to the valley floor- all lives lost.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Spent lots of time on Tiger and Squak Mountains hiking all over the mountains, hunted deer and bear on both mountains.  Fishing in Issaquah Creek for trout and there were many times where I caught the limit of trout (30) per day.  Big bass in the 6-8 lb. range caught at Monohon Mill or Lake Sammamish.  Deer herds as large as 15 would come down into our farm fields and even today deer abound at farm which is now the Squak Valley Park Site.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Of course fishing is no longer allowed in Issaquah Creek but times gone by caught limits which ranged from high of 30 down to 15 mostly rainbow and Kokanee (silver) trout.  In Lake Tradition which had a raft on it caught fish and perch (6”-8”) sizes abound (no limit) caught many.  In Lake Sammamish- rainbow, bass, perch, catfish, Kokanee, trout ranges upwards 2-3 lbs, bass 6-8 lbs. Catfish and perch small 6”-12” inches.

Used mostly worms and periwinkles in creek, spinner and worms in Lake Sammamish, worms in Lake Tradition, Pine Lake, Yellow Lake and Beaver Lake, and Sutter’s Lake (now called Laughing Jacob Lake).

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Vasa- memories include many mid summer festivals- picnics, speeches, swimming- took swimming lessons there.

Roller-skated many times in Vasa Hall which had skating every weekend.

Dances at hall.

Alexander’s Beach on Lake Sammamish- Many picnics and swimming- local organizations held picnics and just about everyone in town went.  Free hot dogs, ice cream, and beer for adults.

Hans Jensen’s Place- Every kid in town probably swam at Han’s where Boat Ramp is on Lake Sammamish is now.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Swam in Lake Sammamish, Pine, Beaver, Round, and Yellow Lakes as well as used inner tubes and floated and swam in swimming holes along Issaquah Creek.

Went sledding on Jake Housman’s hill during winter snows (hill is now Sycamore area of Issaquah).

Ice-skated on Prospect Pond, and our farm pond and the pond that was at intersections of old Issaquah Hobart Road and Issaquah Hobart Road.  Now 238th Way SE and Front St. S.

Played on ice when Lake Sammamish (south end) froze in 1950.  Record cold spell which still is record today.

Also swam in N.P. RR water tank.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

The last stand of old growth trees existed on my place at 10029 Issaquah Hobart Road.  It consisted of 21 trees with diameters up to 5’- the purchaser of the property from me cut them down.  In most cases the trees were 100 feet before the first branches were.

In earlier years the remnants of cedar stumps cut off 8’-10’ above ground existed on the place.  Many were 10’-14’ in diameter.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

My grandfather Eric Erickson was co-owner of the Issaquah Lumber Company Mills at 2nd and Monohon.  From 1929-1944- all I remember about 2nd and Front Mill was when it burned down my mother was first to see fire and she yelled at my dad that the mills was on fire and we ran up the road to the mill.  I also remember remains that existed there for several more years, charred metal, sawdust piles and woody water tank that did not burn.  Visited the Monohon Mill several times when my father was at work there and remember when he came home after the fire and the back of his 1940 Ford car had the paint burned from the fire- watch people catching bass from docks in mill pump house on the lake- remember log trains going through Issaquah and unloading logs on pier out into lake.

Remember many log trains came down from Preston, North Bend area or tracks through Issaquah to Monohon and on to other points.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

Our family farm was located at what is now the Squak Valley Park- Barn and Farm House still exist on all owners by City of Issaquah.  We raised beef and had a small herd of milk cows (15 max) for which I hand milked, every morning and evening until 1957.  Of course there was hay to cut, put in barn, manure to shovel out of barn and put in fields.  Milk compartment to clean and wash and 5-gallon creamer cans and 10 gallon milk cans to handle.

Issaquah Auto Freight picked them up at farm and delivered them to the Issaquah Creamery.

During the later years of my other grandfather’s life (Frank Klotz) I helped him with his chicken farm located at what is now the property at the entrance of Sycamore.  Feeding, picking, and cleaning eggs, preparing chickens for market at Issaquah Meat Stores.  Changing the coal oil (kerosene) handling the 100 lb. sacks of chicken feed.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No, we were co-op owners of Creamery which was called Consolidated Dairy Products.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

As a youngster we only went to Seattle for dentist (Issaquah did not have one) and to Sears.  Dentist by bus- Sears by car (Sears did not have a catalog or retail store in Issaquah).  Later traveled to work in Seattle (5 days a week) mostly by bus except for meeting nights.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It, along with the construction of the Mercer Island Floating Bridge in 1939 and US 10 Now Gilman Blvd. changed Issaquah forever.  Development and traffic resulting from these roads have made Issaquah a mess.  We no longer have the peace and quiet and the mess is still under way and will get worse.

As a youth I could walk down the middle of the Issaquah Hobart Road (now First St. S) to Issaquah and only on occasion have to move to the side to let a car go by- over 20,000 cars a day now use road and you would get killed walking on parts of it without sidewalks.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Bought first car a used 1946 Ford Coup from Hepler’s.  Irv Nelson was Hepler salesman and my father purchased several cars and trucks from them and later when Irv went to North Bend Motors bought cars and trucks then- Irv later worked as a truck salesman from East Gate Motors the predecessors to Evergreen Ford now in Issaquah.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

Not an active member except for Issaquah Historical Society

Went to and participated in many events held and sponsored by the Elks, Eagles Mason’s.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

See my book History of the Issaquah Sportsmen’s Club copy on file at historical society.  I have been involved with the club for over 45 years and participated with my dad in earlier events at the club.

Club has sportsmen youth since 1952 to youth conservation camps.  I was sponsored by the club to the first Washington State Conservation Camp held at Orcas Island in 1952 and have been active since then in many Sportsmen’s Organizations.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Dances and used the Indoor Shooting range in basement where the first hunter education programs were held in the State of Washington- They were voluntary in the early days and no required to get a hunting license.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Attended many dinners, banquets held there included- both Democratic and Republican Banquets- Sportsmen’s Club and Grange Dinners and Dances

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

Remember the coal slack piles located where Evergreen Place is not on Front St. S.  They were on fire for many years until they were removed and a mobile home park was built there.  (Now Evergreen Place Condos and Apartments).  Also across street and creek were large slack piles and the old mine entrance which was not sealed up.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

As a small boy we went to the Saturday matinees and sat in the front row looking up at the screen, watched the weekly newsreel, serial westerns, cartoons.  Candy bars were a nickel, bottle of pop 10¢ and they had popcorn.

 

Front Street

Places I remember on Front Street in the 1940 and 1950s Lewis Hardware, Cussack Shoes, Lawill’s Drugs, Theater, Issaquah 10¢ Store, Wold Hardware, Drylies Honeysuckle, Tony and Johnny’s Market (2 different locations), Thomas Furniture,  Issaquah State Bank, Fisher Meats, IOOF Hall, Hailstone Feeds, Johnson Photography, Dr. Hillery’s Home and Office, Issaquah Press, Grange, Alpine Dairy, Hepler Ford Motor, Peters Real Estate, the Castagno, Stonebridge, Maroni and Clark Homes on Front Street South.  The High School

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Although not a regular church member I attended a number of different churches and Sunday schools, they included the Community Church which was located in the second story office building which now stands on south bank of the east fork of Issaquah Creek on the west side of Rainer Blvd.  Others included the High Point Church, Martin Hansen Pastor, the church next to Issaquah Press (Lois Hines Pastor for many years) the Roadside Chapel on the Issaquah Hobart Road south of the Cedar Grove Road.

 

Additional Memories

Growing up in the valley south of town I remember the many small farms and the old timers who lived and earned a living on them.  In addition to our family dairy farm and Grandpa Klotz’s chicken farm.  There was the Hausman Dairy Farm where sycamore now is, the Hart Dairy Farm where the paragliders now land (both sides of Issaquah Hobart Road).  Tom Mason Dairy Farm on May Valley Road where Sunset Valley Homes Development is located.  Tondreau Farm, Mr. Tondreau used bulls to pull his farm equipment with, it was located across the Issaquah Hobart Road from the Tiger Mountain Vet just south of Cedar Grove Road.

The King County gravel pits located (1) E. Lake Sammamish Parkway just south of SE 56th (eastside) (2) May Valley Road just east of Tom Mason Farm, (3) Hobart just North of the Cedar River.

The big freeze, followed by a heavy wet snow in January, February of 1950 and the big floods that followed.  Many roads washed out.  This event was at least twice as large as 1990 and 1996 floods.  Also the south end of Lake Sammamish froze over.  Cars and people were out on the lake.  Although most of the logging in the valley had been done some logging near the top of the west face of Tiger Mountain and on the east face of Squak Mountain was still under way in the 1950s.

As a teenager I helped a number of old timers with their farm work, some of them paid me and some did not.  One who did was Mr. Prospect who lived on what is now Lewis Lane, he paid me in Green Silver Dollars, this supported the fact that it was reported he lost his money in the 1929 bank failures and did not trust them.  So he buried his earnings in the form of silver dollars and returned them to pay people.  He also picked dandelions along side of the roads and made good dandelion wine.

Almost everyone in the south valley picked wild blackberries and most of the men hunted deer and bear on both Tiger and Squak Mountains with a high success rate.  In the 50s there was a bounty paid for cougars and crows, $75 for cougars and 10¢ per crow and many hunted those on the hills as well.  Even today the number of deer, bear, and cougars are about the same as the 1950s but the number of cows is not as large.  Due to the number of chickens and eggs in the valley during the 1940s and 1950s there also was a large number of skunks (almost none now) who like eggs and baby chicks.

Of course the telephone system consisting of farmer owned and maintained lines which had up to 10 parties (customers) on each line was very interesting whenever you picked up the receiver and someone was on the line you could hear all that was said by both parties.  So the phone was a source for a number of people to keep up on what was going on in the neighborhood by listening in to others conversations.

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Bill Evans

Bill Evans

Name:Bill Evans

Birth Date or Year (optional):

May 7, 1923

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

61 years

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Moved to Seattle to work in 1941.

Went into the service 1943 – Out in Dec. ’45

Married a Seattle girl in 1948.

4 years at the U of Wash, built a home in Seattle 1954

Moved home to Issaquah in 1958

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Graduated Issaquah High School 1941

Graduated U. of Washington 1952

 

Family History in Issaquah:

My father’s family settled in Issaquah in the late 1880s.

My mother’s family came to Issaquah in 1900.

 

Education — Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential? 

I attended Issaquah High School from 1937 to 1941. There were approximately 230 students in the school at that time so students had the opportunity to participate in many of the extra-curricular school activities. Because of the small student population, teachers had the opportunity to know most pupils personally and to spend more productive teaching time with each student who wanted it. For me, the experience prepared me well to succeed during my college career, even though, thanks to World War II, I didn’t start college until 7 years later.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I knew Minnie Schomber after she was no longer teaching, but when she held the position of Clerk for the City of Issaquah in the 1930s and ’40s. She was a very happy and active person loved by everyone who knew her. Her husband, Jake, was another great individual who was the school janitor when I was in grade school in the old three story brick building located behind where the Middle School now stands. Jake wasn’t just a janitor, he was a wonderful unofficial counselor to any kid in trouble at school. Jake and Minnie were wonderful people and I’ll always fondly remember them.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was in college lecture hall at the U. of W. in ’49 and rode out the quake with 200 other students.

I moved my family back to Issaquah in 1958 and the most poignant memory I have of the ’65 quake was going downtown after it was over and seeing three prominent town lushes on Front St. in front of the liquor store where all the bottles had smashed to the floor, their contents pouring out under the door and into the street. One could tell by the expression on their faces that they were in deep mourning. Just one of thousands of tragedies that earthquakes bring.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

My friend, Walt Seil, and I had the co-leads in our Junior play and it was such a great experience and we enjoyed it so much we became great thespians. We ad libbed through each performance and drove our drama coach, Miss Alice Hunt, crazy.

Walt and I are still close friends today and have a great time reminiscing about that experience.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Our most memorable free time was spent during the summer months at Ek’s Resort on Lake Sammamish. We swam and enjoyed water sports during the day and after dark, danced the night away to the tunes on the jukebox in their dance hall. I enjoyed those times so much, many a night I walked the three miles back to Issaquah after midnight because I didn’t have a car.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I remember fondly two stores still operating in Issaquah – Fischer Meats and Lewis Hardware. Every time I went into Fischer’s Market with my folks to buy meat during the Great Depression, John Fischer would give me a wiener, a big treat in those days!

At Lewis Hardware, they used to have ladders on rails on the sidewalls of the store to enable them to retrieve stock for sale that was stored on the walls up to the ceiling. On summer days when they weren’t busy, Tom Lewis would let me ride the ladders from the front of the store to the back. Great fun! I’ll always remember!

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

My first professional haircut, at age 4, was at Paul Benson’s Barber Shop in the center of Issaquah located just west of where the Mandarin Garden restaurant is today. I continued going there until I went into the service at age 18.

Paul was a great Christian man and an excellent barber. Tragically, he lost his only son in World War II.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

In the 1930s when I was growing up, the main grocery store in town was the Red & White. Mickey Miles owned the store and without him and his charge account ledger book, half the families in Issaquah would have starved. Thankfully, his heart was as big as the stacks of bills he never collected on.

 

Local Politics

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Stella Alexander, Issaquah’s first female mayor, was a real colorful character. She was large of stature, walked with an air of authority, and gave looks that scared not only us little kids, but I’ll bet, many grown men who had business with the city’s mayor.

My greatest memory of her involved her two little dogs. She had two little Manchesters (sort of like fox terriers) who went everywhere in town with her, and not on leashes. Three or four times a week you could see her walking on Front St., her dogs at her feet, heading for Fischer’s Meat Market. She would make her meat purchase, put on package in each dog’s mouth, and head for home with her pets prancing in front of her, so proud of the attention they were attracting from all the townspeople on the street. I’ll bet those steaks were real tender what with all the canine perforations in them by the time they arrived home.

 

Issaquah Round-Up– Salmon Days– Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

My first memory of the summer celebrations in Issaquah is of the rodeos when I was 4 years old. It was an exciting time each year, not only for 4 your olds, but for the whole community. The cowboys and horses, the western outfits that all the town’s citizens wore, and the carnival all made it the celebration of the year. The carnival was even more exciting to me than the rodeo events. At night with all its glitter and bright multi-colored lights really lighting up our little town, I was able to gather up almost enough memories to just about last me until it was time for the rodeo and carnival to come again the next year.

 

Additional Memories

One anecdote about Issaquah history that is enjoyed by everyone I tell involves my grandfather, August Willig. My mother’s family came to Issaquah in 1900, and in the 20s my grandfather became Issaquah’s first water dept. superintendent. The title was impressive but with the small crew he was given, he was down in the mud-filled ditches with his men. In those days, they laid wooden water mains wrapped with wire for added strength. He laid out the water system for most of Issaquah in those days.

In the late 30s, he was in his seventies and decided it was time to retire to a more leisurely life. However, it was soon discovered at City Hall that many of the plans showing the locations of mains he had turned over to the City had become lost over the years and he was the only one who knew where the mains were located.

So at the age of 75 he was asked by the City to come back as a consultant to draw new maps of the system. They gave him an old Ford pickup to get around town. Now my grandfather was getting hard of hearing and one fine day as he was heading for City Hall up Sunset Way, the twice-a-day freight train was approaching the intersection with Sunset Way with its whistle blowing loudly. My grandfather didn’t hear it. The train hit him broadside and pushed him all the way down to the depot. The pickup was beat up but not my grandfather. Six months later the same scenario. The train hit that poor old pickup broadside, pushed it down to the depot again and this time the Ford was totaled. Again, my grandfather escaped with minor injuries, but was wise enough to know he was really tempting fate so he retired again, this time for good.

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Josephine Garner

 Name: Josephine Garner

 

Birth Date or Year (optional):

7/34/15

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I came to Issaquah in 1934.  I’ve lived here about 67 years.

 

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

I came down here to live with a school teacher (Blanche Otin)

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I married Ai in 1941 and have lived here ever since.

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

None here.

 

Family History in Issaquah:

My husband Ai M. Garner was born and raised in Issaquah.  My two daughters (Karen and Judy) were born in Issaquah.  Karen lives in Ballard now.  Judy lives in East Wenatchee.  I have one grandson (Troy) and two great granddaughters (Mikayla and Jessica).

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

Did not go to High School here. I graduated from Darrington High School in 1933. Lived with a school teacher (Blanche Otin). I also came to Issaquah with her.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie was a good friend of mine.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

(1965) I was a secretary at Issaquah Jr. High School at the time.

It was frightening – but no particular [damage] as I remember.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Brady’s Dry Goods Store. I bought a pair of dark blue slacks. I still have them. They are as good as new.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

It seemed like they had everything you needed.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Tony’s & Johnny’s. Ai was a meat cutter there for awhile.

He worked a long time at Fischer’s Meat Market and also at Tony & Johnny’s Food Center.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

I did shop at the Grange Mercantile. Yes, we rented a frozen food locker.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Yes, I was at both of these places. Rena’s cafe had wonderful pies.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes, I went to B. Candies. My favorites were all the candy.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

My husband went to the H & H tavern.

[Referring to the photo on page 8] – Ai went to this tavern (Johnnie’s) also.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

I shopped here too, quite a bit.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I remember shopping at Lawill’s drug store.

 

Local Politics

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

Didn’t really know too much about her. I just heard that she was awfully feisty.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Don’t remember this.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Yes, I knew several men that went to fight the war.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

No. I did not know any were that taken to the int. camps – but I know there were a few from Issaquah.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

I worked at Boeings for a short while – about 1942.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

A very nice time was had by all. Big crowds.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

I was not here for the rodeo day – but my husband Ai participated in the rodeos.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Bigger crowds every year.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

I’ve heard they were fabulous.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Ai was the fisherman in our family – he literally loved it.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Ai caught a lot of trout.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Oh, I loved it – they had a big celebration every year – I had fun dancing in the Hall.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Yes, I went swimming at Alexander’s beach a lot. So did my 2 daughters (Karen & Judy). Yes, I also went skating at the Horrock’s pond.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

It was employment for many men.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

Yes, I remember them all.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

No, I was not here at that time, but I heard about it.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Yes, I used to go down to the Pickering farm a lot with Rita Pickering Lewis.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No, I did not.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Traveled a few times to Seattle when you had to go around Renton and Rainier Ave.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

You could get to Seattle in a lot less time.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

We bought a Chev. car from S. Chev.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

My husband Ai belonged to the club.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I used to go to dances at the IVFD Hall.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes, I did – and also dances.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

No.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I remember going to the Theatre with my 2 daughters. Don’t remember the cost.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

The Community Church. I just can’t remember the name of the Pastor – She was a lady. Someone will surely remember her name. She was very popular.

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