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Grand Central Hotel and Stage

Looking back: Grand Central Hotel – Circa 1930

Published in the Issaquah Press on January 17, 2001

Grand Central Hotel and Stage

Stage in Front of Grand Central Hotel – Circa 1930 [IHM photo]

One of the forerunners to a Metro Bus is parked in front of the Grand Central Hotel in this circa 1930 photo. The stage, as it was called then, appears to hold about 14 or 15 passengers and, at the time of this photo, is awaiting passengers. The Issaquah Press advertises on September 16, 1931, that hotel rooms are 75 cents and up, with weekly rates ranging from $ 2 to $ 3. Mrs. M. Z. Marion is proprietress of the hotel, and Ratchford & Kennedy are proprietors of the cafe, which advertises a dinner at 40 cents.

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Grand Central

Looking back: Grand Central Hotel – Circa 1940

Published in the Issaquah Press on January 24, 2001

Grand Central

This 1940 photo shows that the cafe had become the “Issaquah 10¢ Store.” At this time, the facade of the current “Rolling Log” tavern had been constructed to the west (left) of the hotel, but the tavern had not yet been expanded to take over part of the hotel building. (Photo courtesy of Denny Croston – Originally from Tax Records)

As part of a King County Assessor’s Office program, all buildings in the county were photographed in the late 1930’s and early 1940’s. In this photograph, taken Feb. 19, 1940, more changes to the hotel have occurred. An additional door has been added next to the right side windows, the porch posts have been removed and replaced with rods anchoring the marquee to the top of the buildings, the cafe is now Issaquah 10 cent Store and the log tavern has been built along side of the dime store. A new sign also advertises the hotel. The hotel building now contains 25 rooms, three sinks, three bath tubs on legs and six toilets.

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Grand Central Hotel circa 1970s

Looking back: Grand Central Hotel – circa 1970

Published in the Issaquah Press on January 31, 2001

Grand Central Hotel circa 1970s

Grand Central Hotel circa 1970s [IHM photo #72.21.14.190]

By the 1970’s. major changes have altered the once proud Grand Central Hotel building into a shadow of its past. The marquee has been removed and the wood siding has been covered with imitation brick. Art Burt’s Real Estate office occupies the lower right corner of the building of the building and the Log Tavern (now the Rolling Log Tavern) has been expanded into the former 10-cent store and part of the hotel building. A smaller hotel sign has been installed. now identifying the building as The Hotel–Grand Central.

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1930s Mill Street Looking East

Looking back: Looking East from Mill and Front – circa 1930

Published in the Issaquah Press on February 14, 2001

1930s Mill Street Looking East

Looking East from Mill and Front during a winter in the 1930s [IHM photo #72.22.14.128]

As we leave the last series about the Grand Central Hotel we will take one last look at the north side of Mill Street, now the 040 block of East Sunset Way.

In this late 1930’s winter scene, ice and snow as well as sacked and boxed goods are stacked on the sidewalk in front of the Money Saver’s Grocery Store (now Mandarin Garden Restaurant). Continuing to the right in the photo are the Log Tavern, Grand Central Hotel & Cafe, Puget Sound Power & Light substation.

Centered behind the double set of power poles is the New Issaquah Town Hall, completed in 1930 and demolished in 1996 to make way for the new Police Building.

 

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Mill Street Looking East - 1924

Looking back: Mill Street Looking East – 1924

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 7, 2001

Mill Street Looking East - 1924

Mill Street Looking East – 1924 [IHM photo 95.21.1]

As we stand at what is now the intersection of First Place Northwest and West Sunset Way, we are looking east towards Front Street in this 1924 Mill Street view. On the left is a vacant lot where the new library is under construction. Behind the second power pole on the left is the Andrew L. Wold Co. building, and in front of the pole is the railroad crossing sign marking the tracks across the intersection leading to the coal mines on Mine Hill Road.

The tracks were abandoned this year, but were not removed until many years later. On the right is the Red Crown Service Station (now the Rogue Issaquah Brewhouse). Street parking, including enforcement, were not a problem as indicated by the few cars on the street and the one in front of the service station facing the wrong direction.

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Mill Street Looking West

Looking back: Mill Street Looking West – circa 1915

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 14, 2001

Mill Street Looking West

A Ford Model T on Mill Street looking west. [IHM photo 93-26-1]

The photographer taking this circa 1915 photograph must be the driver of this early Model T Ford as the car’s driver is missing. The woman and two children in the car are looking back towards Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church which was on the north side of Mill Street (now East Sunset Way mid-block between Third and Fifth avenues northeast). The first Catholic services were held in the Michael Donlan log cabin in 1883. The cabin and Michael’s son’s sawmill was located where the existing Mormon church is now on Sixth Avenue Southeast. Lumber from the sawmill was used to build this building in 1896 as a home for the church. The Coca Cola sign on the building on the left reminds us that about 1915 was when Coca Cola introduced its trademark bottle design still used today.

 

 

Front Street Looking South

Looking back: Front Street Looking South – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 4, 2001

Front Street Looking South

Front Street Looking South – circa 1910 [IHM photo 72.21.14.201]

As we look south down Front Street in 1910. we see several well known businesses. The building at the far right edge of the photo is the Bank of Issaquah (now a bicycle shop). The buildings on the left (from foreground to background) are Van Winkle’s Store, Pacific Hotel, Cubbon’s Grocery, Gibson Drugs, Barber Shop, IOOF Hall, Clark’s Saloon, Holmes “Tailor”, Garner’s Barber Shop, Soapy Smith Candy, and E. J. Anderson’s Hardware Building (now called the Wold Building where Jak’s Grill is located).

 

 

Front Sreet from south

Looking back: Front Street Looking North – circa 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 11, 2001

Front Sreet from south

Front Street Looking North – circa 1911 [IHM photo 72.21.14.214]

This early 1913 photo leads one to ask: Would the pedestrian standing in the middle of Front Street be willing to stand there today? The picture, taken looking north from a point that’s north of Mill Street (now Sunset Way), shows the striped barber pole (next to the utility pole) in front of William Garner’s Tonsorial Artist Shop. Baths are available there. The sign on the side of the building next to the barber pole is C. R. Berry advertising his real estate office, which was there until July 1913, when he moved to the Issaquah Bank building. Note the wavy wooden sidewalks on both sides of the street.

 

 

Front and Sunset

Looking back: Front Street Looking North – circa 1913

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 18, 2001

Front and Sunset

Intersection of Sunset Way (formerly Mill Street) and Front Street, looking north. ca 1913 [IHM photo 72.21.14.191A]

This early 1913 photo leads one to ask: Would the pedestrian standing in the middle of Front Street be willing to stand there today? The picture, taken looking north from a point that’s north of Mill Street (now Sunset Way), shows the striped barber pole (next to the utility pole) in front of William Garner’s Tonsorial Artist Shop. Baths are available there. The sign on the side of the building next to the barber pole is C. R. Berry advertising his real estate office, which was there until July 1913, when he moved to the Issaquah Bank building. Note the wavy wooden sidewalks on both sides of the street.