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Preston, Climax Logging Engine, Preston Mill Co.

Looking back: Preston Logging Crew and Locomotive

Published in the Issaquah Press on June 28, 2000

Preston, Climax Logging Engine, Preston Mill Co.

Circa 1910 photo of four men standing on Climax Logging Engine 1 of the Preston Mill Co. The child sitting on back of engine is possibly Hugo Johnson. Written on back is “Olga Fritzberg.” [IHM photo 86-18-234]

Representatives of the Preston Mill Co. pose with their Climax locomotive, which was purchased from the Doty Lumber and Shingle Co. in Doty, Wash. Elof Edwins, part owner of the Preston Mill Co., is shown standing closest to the No. 1 on the newly repainted locomotive in this 1921 photo. The mill’s railroad will be extended several miles up the Raging River valley until it shuts down in 1930.

Looking back: Locomotive at Preston

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 5, 2000

[Image Missing]

The Press continues its series of locomotives from the past in this photograph from the 1920’s. Shown is the Preston Mill Co.’s fourth locomotive, a used Lima Shay here at Upper Preston. It is the second engine with the number 1 on the cab belonging to Preston Mill Co.

Millpond at the Upper Preston Sawmill

Looking back: Upper Preston Sawmill

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 19, 2000

Millpond at the Upper Preston Sawmill

This photograph, ca. 1910, gives a rare view of the Upper Preston Sawmill millpond where logs were stored before being sent down the flume. [IHM photo 94-1-4]

In a glimpse from a scene in the 1920’s, the Preston Mill Company’s Upper Preston Sawmill is at the center of the photograph. To the right, at the top of the hill is the cookhouse. Climax Locomotive # 2 is shown at left in the rear. The mill pond in the foreground is full of logs.

Preston Steam Donkey and Crew

Looking back: Steam Donkey At Upper Preston

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 26, 2000

Preston Steam Donkey and Crew

Darius Kinsey print of the Preston Mill Co., steam donkey and crew circa 1917.
L-R: Pete Erickson, James Mattson, unidentified, Mattias Houde, Thomas Lee, Carl Bystrom, unidentified. [IHM photo 93.032.002 or fic-2000-59]

The Press continues its look back at Issaquah’s logging-days roots. In this photograph dated from 1916-1917, Peter Erickson can be seen on the left standing next to the Preston Mill Co’s logging boss James Matson. Both men are part of the crew logging along Raging River above Upper Preston. The steam donkey is from the Road Engine family used to pull logs long distances.

Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Looking back: Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 2, 2000

Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain [IHM photo 89-25-6]

The Wood & Iverson Co.’s Climax locomotive is switching a load of log cars near the Caroline Mine on Tiger Mountain. That mine also was known as the Tiger Mountain Coal Mine. The tracks in the lower right corner of the photograph lead to the mill at Hobart.

Wooden Pacific Car

Looking back: Wooden Pacific Rail Car at Highpoint

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 16, 2000

Wooden Pacific Car

Wooden Pacific car on Tiger Mountain. IHM [photo 94-40-2]

Several logs are loaded on one of the High Point Mill Co.’s Wooden Pacific cars at one of the two loading landings on Tiger Mountain. In this circa 1918 photo, the car appears to be at the first landing, which was about halfway up Tiger Mountain on the 9,600 foot Wooden Pacific incline pole road.

Crew with Steam Donkey

Looking back: Washington Iron Works Donkey Above Alexander’s Beach

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 30, 2000

Crew with Steam Donkey

A crew poses in front of the Bratnober Co.’s Washington Iron Works Donkey. [IHM photo 89-25-9]

On the hill above what was formerly Alexander’s Beach on Lake Sammamish, a five-man crew poses in front of the Bratnober Co.’s Washington Iron Works Donkey. The company was constructing the road bed for the logging railroad leading from the Allen & Nelson Sawmill at Monohon up onto the Pine Lake Plateau.

Mill Office at Monohon 1909

Looking back: Monohon Mill Store 1909

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 6, 2000

Mill Office at Monohon 1909

Mill Office at Monohon in 1909. [IHM photo 91.7.13]

This 1909 photograph shows the Allen & Nelson Mill Co.’s office at Monohon. The Monohon Post Office also is located in the building. On the tracks at the right is an Illinois Central Railroad refrigerator car. This car makes for an interesting topic of discussion, as one might wonder what was delivered to Monohon that required the constant cooling from large blocks of ice.

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon

Looking back: Waiting at the Monohon Depot

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 13, 2000

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon. [IHM photo 91.7.48]

While a group of citizens await their train at the Northern Pacific Depot at Monohon, the railroad crew poses on its hand car. This photo presents a couple of interesting points to ponder. For one, the rail crew obviously was integrated to some degree, with an American Indian joining them (second from the left). Secondly the man standing on the right appears to be dressed in a style typical of a locomotive engineer at the time. However there’s no train in the picture and the fact that people are waiting seems to indicate that the train has yet to arrive. Was this the crew that was scheduled to take over for the one that’s bringing the train to Monohon?

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm

Looking back: Pickering Farm – 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 27, 2000

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm [IHM photo 86.18.269A]

The press is beginning a new Looking Back series featuring photographs of the Pickering Farm. The farm was acquired in 1867 by William Pickering, Sr. , the territorial governor of Washington Territory. The farm was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The nine remaining acres of the farm and buildings are owned by the City of Issaquah and are designated one of Issaquah’s 35 city treasures.

In this 1911 photo, Charlie Baxter is driving the three-horse team corn harvester, harvesting corn which appears to be about 10-feet-tall. The man at the right is believed to be a salesman holding up a bundle of harvested corn.