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Wagon Load of Wood

Looking back: Men on a wagon load of firewood

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 1, 2000

Wagon Load of Wood

From left, Elmer Anderson, Jack Tamborini, Jack Favini, John Favini and John Kranick. [IHM photo]

Before trucks became the prime mover of firewood, a horse-drawn wagon was the favored mode of transportation. In this photo, circa 1915, Issaquah residents (from left) Elmer Anderson, Jack Tamborini, Jack Favini, John Favini and John Kranick haul wood that appears to be left over from a local cedar shake cutting operation. It is clear based on the muddy wheels, that the road wasn’t paved at this point.

Planer Shed at Monohon Mill

Looking back: Workers at Monohon Mill

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 8, 2000

Planer Shed at Monohon Mill

Planer shed at Monohon Mill in 1943. [IHM photo 91.17.5]

This photograph offers a look into Issaquah’s past as home to several mills. Part of the Issaquah Lumber Co. crew is shown in the planer shed at its Monohon Mill in this circa 1943 photo. The local faces include Floyd Erickson (third from left), who is standing next to his father, Eric Erickson (fourth from left). Members of the Rudstrom family also are in the picture, which illustrates how women stepped into such jobs during World War II (sixth and eighth from left). The Monohon Mill no longer exists, and the Issaquah Lumber Co. is now the Issaquah Cedar & Lumber Co. located on East Lake Sammamish Parkway.

Issaquah School Bus 1935

Looking back: Early School Bus

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 22, 2000

Issaquah School Bus 1935

Issaquah school bus depicted in an “advertisement” in the 1935 Issaquah High School Annual.

One of the Issaquah School District’s earliest buses is pictured in this advertisement in the 1935 yearbook. Heiser added the body to a frame and chassis likely made by the Kenworth Co. you might note that the school district was No. 212 at the time. It was changed to 227 in 1937, and became today’s No. 411 in 1944. Nearly all of the students in the 1930s either rode the bus to school or walked. That’s a stark contrast to today, when student parking lots are consistently overflowing.

Railroad Bridge to Coal Mines on Mine Hill

Looking back: Bridge – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 5, 2000

Railroad Bridge to Coal Mines on Mine Hill

Railroad bridge to coal mines on Mine Hill circa 1919.

During the next few weeks, we’ll look back at some of the community’s better known railroad bridges. In 1910, this bridge was built across the Issaquah Creek near the present-day hatchery. The tracks went from the main line at the depot to the mines on Mine Hill, then looped around to rejoin the main line just behind the existing apartment building at 850 Front St. S. What appears to be a hand car is on the bridge, above the second pillar from the left. In 1923, the rails were removed and the ‘Issaquah loop’ was no longer used. The bridges remained for many years, however.

Bridge across Issaquah Creek

Looking back: Bridge – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 12, 2000

Bridge across Issaquah Creek

Bridge crossing Issaquah Creek to Mine Hill, circa 1910. [IHM photo]

Continuing our look back at area bridges, this week we show (at left) a “new” one from 1910 that provided access to coal company homes on what is now the 300 block of Mine Hill Road Southwest. The bridge was built across Issaquah Creek near where the new foot bridge crosses the creek at the fish hatchery. The bridge was destroyed by a flood in February 1932. In 1921, the Town of Issaquah acquired the property on both sides of the creek adjoining the bridge and named it City Park. It is now the fish hatchery and Gibson Hall properties.

Issaquah High Trestle

Looking back: Bridge – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 19, 2000

Issaquah High Trestle

Issaquah High Trestle near what is now I90 on-ramp from Sunset Way, circa 1910. [IHM photo 86-18-246a]

In this photograph from 1910, the Issaquah High Trestle is shown at the end of what is now Sunset Way as it enters the on-ramp to Interstate 90. The home on the left has been remodeled and expanded, but is still standing at 760 E Sunset Way. As construction begins on the new Sunset Interchange, the house will be removed. The trestle, built in 1888, was torn down in 1975 to make way for I-90.

High Point Mill Locomotive

Looking back: Log Cars on Tiger Mountain

Published in the Issaquah Press on May 17, 2000

High Point Mill Locomotive

High Point Mill Co. locomotive. [IHM photo 93.12.1]

Moving stacks of long, heavy logs was no easy feat in the early logging days. In the next several installments of Looking Back, we’ll take a look at some of the locomotives and techniques used to move the area’s prime resource. In this Kinsey photo, taken in the mid 1920’s, the High Point Mill Co.’s Climax locomotive cruises around the north face of Tiger Mountain. The engine is pulling two of the four skeleton log cars built in Renton by the Pacific Car & Foundry Co.

Preston Mill Locomotive

Looking back: Preston Logging Locomotive

Published in the Issaquah Press on May 24, 2000

Preston Mill Locomotive

The Preston Mill Co.’s fourth locomotive. [IHM photo 93-32-2-18h]


This Kinsey photo of the High Point Mill Co. logging crew on the north face of Tiger Mountain shows several interesting features. On the left is a donkey with a boomerang spark arrestor (the curved pipe extending from the top of the smoke stack to the ground). Also, the locomotive in the middle of the photograph has not been identified as belonging to High Point. Records showed they only owned the Climax shown in last week’s “Looking Back.” Perhaps the High Point company borrowed this one from the Preston Mill Co. about 1924, when Preston’s inventory of engines showed two instead of the three that it owned.

Looking back: Preston Logging Locomotive

Published in the Issaquah Press on May 31, 2000

[IMAGE MISSING]

This week we continue our reflection on the old locomotives that powered the area’s early logging industry. In this shot, the High Point Mill Co.’s Climax locomotive approaches the photographer on the north face of Tiger Mountain. On the left next to the spar tree is a steam loading donkey engine. To the right of the locomotive is a steam yarding donkey engine.

Preston Mill Co. Locomotive Crew

Looking back: Preston Logging Crew and Locomotive

Published in the Issaquah Press on June 7, 2000

Preston Mill Co. Locomotive Crew

Clark Kinsey picture of the Preston Mill Company crew posing on a steam engine on the railroad tracks. Notations on the reverse read “John Lindquist and Harry Lindquist, brothers. Mattson.” [IHM photo 92-28-1]

In this Clark Kinsey photo from the mid 1920’s. the High Point Mill Co.’s logging crew is shown taking a break while posing with their Climax Locomotive. This photo is among those featured in the Mill Street logging scene mural on East Sunset Way at First Avenue Southeast in downtown Issaquah.