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Goode Farm 1912

Looking back: Goode Farm

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 7, 1999

Goode Farm 1912

Goode Farm in the winter of 1912. [IHM photo]

For variety, this week we’ll take a different look at the Goode Farm. This photograph shows the farm, which was acquired from the Tibbetts before 1912, covered with a winter snowfall. Goode’s Corner was in the vicinity of where the present-day Newport Way intersects with State Route 900.

Climax Locomotive

Looking back: Superior Coal and Improvement Co. locomotive

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 14, 1999

Climax Locomotive

Superior Coal and Improvement Co.’s Climax locomotive circa 1910. [IHM photo]

This 1910 photograph shows the Superior Coal and Improvement Co.’s Climax locomotive that was used to haul coal from the mines south of Goode’s Corner to a connector with the Northern Pacific Railroad. The connection was located near what is now the intersection between Rainier and Gilman Boulevards. As someone has observed in hand writing over time, Victoria Ek is standing second from the left in front of the engineer’s cab. Ek was the city’s treasurer in 191.

Freight truck circa 1920

Looking back: Issaquah & Seattle Freight Co. Truck

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 21, 1999

Freight truck circa 1920

Issaquah & Seattle Freight Co. truck circa 1920

Here’s a look at one of the early trucks belonging to the Issaquah & Seattle Freight Co. The truck is parked along the old Sunset Highway (now State Route 900) near Goode’s Corner circa 1920.

Gibson House

Looking back: Gibson House

Published in the Issaquah Press on July 28, 1999

Gibson House

This photograph shows the home of Dr. W.E. Gibson at Front Street South and southeast corner of Andrews Street. The picture was taken before the popular Gingko tree was planted on the site. The Ginkgo tree has since become a city treasure at its visible location at the Downtown Issaquah Plaza. (Issaquah History Museums photo)

This photograph shows the home of Dr. W.E. Gibson at Front Street South and southeast corner of Andrews Street. The picture was taken before the popular Gingko tree was planted on the site. The Gingko tree has since become a city treasure at its visible location at the Downtown Issaquah Plaza.

Ginko Tree

Looking back: Ginkgo Tree

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 4, 1999

Ginko Tree

August 1999 photo by David Bangs.

This well-known Ginkgo tree in Downtown Issaquah Plaza is located on the former site of Dr. William E. Gibson’s home. The tree was planted in the early 1900s by Gibson, who served as [an early Issaquah mayor]. For centuries, Ginkgo Trees have played sacred roles in Buddhist temple gardens. They have existed for millions of years, having served as food for dinosaurs during the Mesozoic Era (240 million years ago to 65 million years ago).

Lewis Hardware

Looking back: Lewis Hardware

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 11, 1999

Lewis Hardware

Lewis Hardware [IHM photo]

This photo depicts the original Lewis Hardware Building, which was located on the west side of Front Street near the present day Dogwood Street. The hardware shop moved in 1921 to its current location at 95 Front Street North. In the early days of the business, J.J. Lewis was joined by a Mr. White. They provided furniture and performed carpentry work in addition to hardware sales

Interior of Lewis Hardware

Looking back: Lewis Hardware

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 25, 1999

Interior of Lewis Hardware

In this 1920 photograph, Tom Lewis, proprietor J.J. Lewis’ son, is minding Lewis Hardware. [IHM photo 92.016.001]

To continue our look at the history of Lewis Hardware, today we see a photograph circa 1930 of a young Tom Lewis inside the shop. The merchandise has changed, but much of the building and its interior remains the same today. Lewis Hardware, at 95 Front Street North, moved to its current location in 1921 from its original home at 305 Front Street North, which is now the address of Cascade bank.

Looking back: Fink’s Garage

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 22, 1999

Fink’s Garage was one place to fill’er up during the 1930’s. The station sold Red Crown Gasoline, which is now known as Chevron. The garage later became the Fink Motor Company, with the proprietor selling Chevrolet cars and pick-up trucks. The dealership eventually was sold to the Stonebridge family, which continued selling Chevrolets for many years, including post-World War II years. If the building seems a bit familiar, it could be because it is well known today as the home of Busch Collision, 290 East Sunset Way.

Issaquah Roundup 1924

Looking back: Issaquah Roundup

Published in the Issaquah Press on October 6, 1999

Issaquah Roundup 1924

Bucking broncos at the Issaquah Roundup 1924

This photograph was taken during one of Issaquah’s early celebrations. A Seattle photographer snapped this shot of a cowboy trying to maintain his balance on a bucking bronco during the Issaquah Roundup, which traditionally took place around Labor Day each year. This picture is from 1924 when the roundup was Aug. 30- Sept. 1. The Issaquah Roundup is generally considered the forerunner of today’s Salmon Days Festival, which marked its 30th anniversary this year.

Gilman Band July 4,1893

Looking back: Gilman Band

Published in the Issaquah Press on December 8, 1999

Gilman Band July 4,1893

The Gilman Band on July 4,1893. [IHM photo]

The next few installments of Looking Back will focus on celebrations. This photo shows the Gilman Band, which has gathered on the Fourth of July in 1893, just one year after the founding of the Town of Gilman (now Issaquah). Among the items of interest in this photograph are the large Western Red Cedar tree in the background, the hand split cedar fence to the right and the boardwalk in the right foreground. It is clear that, at the time, huge cedar trees were in abundance. Independence Day was a popular holiday for celebrating in the late 1890’s, much as it is today. The Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776, and the first Independence Day celebration was 1777. Of the original 13 colonies, nine voted for the Declaration, two voted against it and one was undecided and one abstained.