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Schomber Garage

Schomber Garage

Schomber Garage

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Built in 1922, the Schomber garage has evolved from garage to barn to tiny shop to a whole new wing of Gilman Village. The newly created building provided a comfortable transition between the old houses along the deck to the roadway, Gilman Blvd.

 

 

 

 

Dons Quick Stop

Don’s Quick Stop

Dons Quick Stop

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Two sisters, Emily Darst Walker and Inez Darst Gunderson, ran the Swanee Grocery along what is now Gilman Boulevard for years. Later residents remember it as Don’s Quick Stop. It was part of a rapidly deteriorating assortment of odds and ends once cited by IREQ (Issaquah Residents for Environmental Quality) as the worst looking commercial strip in Issaquah.

 

 

 

 

Schomber House II

Schomber House II

Schomber House II

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

One of the most charming stories of Gilman Village is the story of the rhododendron. It was planted in front of the second Schomber house when it was completed in 1936 by Henry Schomber, son of the Issaquah baker, next door to the family home on Front Street.

When the Schomber home was moved to Gilman Village in 1974, the then 38-year-old family rhodie was moved too. The house itself underwent a major face and roof lift when it arrived in its present location to accommodate businesses on the second floor.

 

 

 

Schomber House

Schomber House

Schomber House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

The Schomber House is another twice-moved Gilman Village treasure. It was built in 1900 along Front Street beside the family bakery. The house was relocated in 1921 on the site now housing Rainier Bank. During the moving, Harry Schomber, a boy at the time, slept nights in the upstairs of the house.

The house’s original foundation contained some of the bricks from the first baking oven which Schomber’s daughter, Gertrude, says he dismantled when he converted his bakery oven to coke fuel. The bricks now appear at the base of the present green-house window and the garden wall in Gilman Village.

 

 

Anderson House II

Anderson House II

Anderson House II

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This was the permanent family home built by Albert Anderson, a native of Issaquah. The exact date of construction is not clear, but it was probably completed in the late 1920’s. The house has architecturally the same exterior, with its notable three-peaked roof, as when it was moved from its former location (across from the Darigold Dairy) on Front Street in 1972. It has been decorated inside with wall paper and furniture representing the period of construction.

 

 

Livingstone House

Livingston House

Livingstone House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Jake Jones constructed this farmhouse for in-laws in 1913. They farmed the surrounding area until 1940 when the completion of the first Seattle-Mercer Island floating bridge introduced the four-lane era to the Issaquah Valley. In the process, the Livingstone farm was bisected, making farming a losing proposition. The house was moved to a three-acre section where it remained until 1972 when it was moved back another 12 feet to allow for the positioning of the two Anderson homes and the Trigg House as the core of Gilman Village.

 

 

Anderson House

Anderson House

Anderson House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This 1925 bungalow was built by Albert Anderson as temporary quarters for his family while he worked on their permanent home. A small side room was added in the 1930’s to rent to tenants.

The house was located on Front Street to the north of Issaquah Creek, where it remained until it was moved to Gilman Village in 1972.

 

Trigg House

Trigg House

Trigg House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This 1909 house was the real start of Gilman Village. Built by Alfred Morris and Jack Trigg, it has been moved twice. The home first stood where the Darigold plant is now located. It was moved in 1932 by the owner, Louis Krall, to allow for the expansion of the old creamery building to include a feed co-operative. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the building was home to Betty Konarski’s Country Mouse consignment store. Commercial development of the area encroached on the Trigg House once more in 1972 when Safeway Inc. purchased the land (on Front Street across from the Darigold creamery) for a supermarket. In January, 1973, the house was moved to its present location along with the smoke house built by Mr. Krall.

In 1974 the roof of the house was raised to provide a second floor for business space.