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Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Looking back: Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 2, 2000

Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain

Climax Locomotive on Tiger Mountain [IHM photo 89-25-6]

The Wood & Iverson Co.’s Climax locomotive is switching a load of log cars near the Caroline Mine on Tiger Mountain. That mine also was known as the Tiger Mountain Coal Mine. The tracks in the lower right corner of the photograph lead to the mill at Hobart.

Wooden Pacific Car

Looking back: Wooden Pacific Rail Car at Highpoint

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 16, 2000

Wooden Pacific Car

Wooden Pacific car on Tiger Mountain. IHM [photo 94-40-2]

Several logs are loaded on one of the High Point Mill Co.’s Wooden Pacific cars at one of the two loading landings on Tiger Mountain. In this circa 1918 photo, the car appears to be at the first landing, which was about halfway up Tiger Mountain on the 9,600 foot Wooden Pacific incline pole road.

Crew with Steam Donkey

Looking back: Washington Iron Works Donkey Above Alexander’s Beach

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 30, 2000

Crew with Steam Donkey

A crew poses in front of the Bratnober Co.’s Washington Iron Works Donkey. [IHM photo 89-25-9]

On the hill above what was formerly Alexander’s Beach on Lake Sammamish, a five-man crew poses in front of the Bratnober Co.’s Washington Iron Works Donkey. The company was constructing the road bed for the logging railroad leading from the Allen & Nelson Sawmill at Monohon up onto the Pine Lake Plateau.

Mill Office at Monohon 1909

Looking back: Monohon Mill Store 1909

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 6, 2000

Mill Office at Monohon 1909

Mill Office at Monohon in 1909. [IHM photo 91.7.13]

This 1909 photograph shows the Allen & Nelson Mill Co.’s office at Monohon. The Monohon Post Office also is located in the building. On the tracks at the right is an Illinois Central Railroad refrigerator car. This car makes for an interesting topic of discussion, as one might wonder what was delivered to Monohon that required the constant cooling from large blocks of ice.

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon

Looking back: Waiting at the Monohon Depot

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 13, 2000

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon

Hand Car Crew on NP tracks at Monohon. [IHM photo 91.7.48]

While a group of citizens await their train at the Northern Pacific Depot at Monohon, the railroad crew poses on its hand car. This photo presents a couple of interesting points to ponder. For one, the rail crew obviously was integrated to some degree, with an American Indian joining them (second from the left). Secondly the man standing on the right appears to be dressed in a style typical of a locomotive engineer at the time. However there’s no train in the picture and the fact that people are waiting seems to indicate that the train has yet to arrive. Was this the crew that was scheduled to take over for the one that’s bringing the train to Monohon?

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm

Looking back: Pickering Farm – 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 27, 2000

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm

Cutting Corn on Pickering Farm [IHM photo 86.18.269A]

The press is beginning a new Looking Back series featuring photographs of the Pickering Farm. The farm was acquired in 1867 by William Pickering, Sr. , the territorial governor of Washington Territory. The farm was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The nine remaining acres of the farm and buildings are owned by the City of Issaquah and are designated one of Issaquah’s 35 city treasures.

In this 1911 photo, Charlie Baxter is driving the three-horse team corn harvester, harvesting corn which appears to be about 10-feet-tall. The man at the right is believed to be a salesman holding up a bundle of harvested corn.

Pickering Farm Silo 1911

Looking back: Pickering Farm – 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on October 4, 2000

Pickering Farm Silo 1911

Pickering Farm scene, circa 1911. Two silos, horse and wagon, five men and one child in scene. On photo’s reverse is written, “Gary Beetz, Pickering original.” [IHM photo 86-18-272a]

In this circa 1911 photo of the Pickering farm silos, the salesman shown in last week’s photo is standing at left. Meanwhile, two children are at the base of the silo holding corn stocks which appear to be 12- to – 13 feet tall. What is believed to be two members of the Pickering family are on the wagon at the right.

Pickering Farm Silos

Looking back: Pickering Farm – 1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on October 11, 2000

Pickering Farm Silos

Pickering farm silos and unique crawler tractor in 1911. [IHM photo 86.18.272B]

It’s storage time at the Pickering Farm in this circa 1911 photo. A. salesman on the right watches as corn stock silage is blown into the silo on the left. The silo is about half full. as the lower windows are boarded up and a man sits in the third window above the tractor. Roy Pickering is in the middle of the photo, standing between the two silos. The tractor is a Holt caterpillar with a 4-cylinder engine and a single front wheel for steering. The current Caterpillar Tractor Co. was formed in 1925 when it bought out the Holt and Best tractor companies.

Pickering Barn Interior

Looking back: Pickering Farm – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on October 18, 2000

Pickering Barn Interior

Interior of Pickering Barn [IHM photo 86.18.272D]

Part of the Pickering Farm herd of approximately 100 milk cows are eating hay in the milk barn portion of the barn. The milking herd consisted of Holstein and Gurnsey breeds of cattle. The stantions which hold the cows heads were set up so that pulling a single lever would open all the stantions on one side at a time.

Pickering Farm Cows

Looking back: Pickering Farm -1911

Published in the Issaquah Press on October 25, 2000

Pickering Farm Cows

Pickering Farm. Cows are penned in the foreground; corn and silos are visible in the background. [IHM photo 86-18-272c 001]

[The text, which discussed a 1911 images of cows in pens outside the Pickering Barn, has gone astray.]