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Interior of Lewis Hardware

Looking back: Lewis Hardware

Published in the Issaquah Press on August 25, 1999

Interior of Lewis Hardware

In this 1920 photograph, Tom Lewis, proprietor J.J. Lewis’ son, is minding Lewis Hardware. [IHM photo 92.016.001]

To continue our look at the history of Lewis Hardware, today we see a photograph circa 1930 of a young Tom Lewis inside the shop. The merchandise has changed, but much of the building and its interior remains the same today. Lewis Hardware, at 95 Front Street North, moved to its current location in 1921 from its original home at 305 Front Street North, which is now the address of Cascade bank.

Looking back: Fink’s Garage

Published in the Issaquah Press on September 22, 1999

Fink’s Garage was one place to fill’er up during the 1930’s. The station sold Red Crown Gasoline, which is now known as Chevron. The garage later became the Fink Motor Company, with the proprietor selling Chevrolet cars and pick-up trucks. The dealership eventually was sold to the Stonebridge family, which continued selling Chevrolets for many years, including post-World War II years. If the building seems a bit familiar, it could be because it is well known today as the home of Busch Collision, 290 East Sunset Way.

Volunteer Fire Hall

Looking back: Issaquah Volunteer Fire Department Hall

Published in the Issaquah Press on February 2, 2000

Volunteer Fire Hall

Issaquah’s Volunteer Fire Department Hall was built in 1933. [IHM photo.]

The Issaquah Volunteer Fire Department Hall once was one of the community’s most important gathering places. Located where the current library building is now, the hall was a site of numerous Saturday night dances and its basement served as an indoor gun range. The structure was built in 1933 of lumber donated by the Wood and Iverson Mill in Hobart. The lumber was something of a reward to the fire department which had fought a big fire at the mill that torched everything before firefighters could control it—–except the lumber supply. The building was torn down in the 1960’s.

Barlow Farm

Looking back: Barlow Farm – House and Lake View

Published in the Issaquah Press on February 9, 2000

Barlow Farm

Barlow farm house and view toward Lake Sammamish. [IHM photo]

During the next few weeks, we’ll explore the Barlow Farm that was located near the southern tip of Lake Sammamish many years ago. This photo, looking north, shows the Barlow house between 1910 and 1920. Some interesting points in the photo are the old wagon trail to Factoria in the foreground at the far right (now the path of Interstate 90 ), the stand of trees on the point in the background (now the South Cove neighborhood), and the children’s swing in the front yard of the house.)

Barlow Kerola loggers

Looking back: Barlow Farm – Loggers

Published in the Issaquah Press on February 16, 2000

Barlow Kerola loggers

Loggers felling a Western Red Cedar,circa 1900. [IHM photo 95.16.1]

In this early 1900’s photograph, John Barlow and Alfred Kerola are standing on spring boards, as they start the undercut in preparation for felling this large Western red cedar tree with a crosscut felling saw and axes. The location of the tree is unknown, but it is possible it was on the Barlow farm grounds.

Barlow Farm

Looking back: Barlow Farm – Looking toward Cougar Mountain

Published in the Issaquah Press on February 23, 2000

Barlow Farm

Barlow Farm [IHM photo 96-16-3]

The Barlow dairy farm and farmhouse was formerly located on what is now the south side of I-90 going up the hill westbound toward Eastgate in Bellevue. This photograph most likely dates before 1920, as the paved Newport Way, which is now in the area behind the former farmhouse, is not there. Construction of U.S. 10 in the late 1930’s cut the farm property in half. A hand-piled hay stack is located in the right corner of the photo next to the split rail fence.

Wagon Load of Wood

Looking back: Men on a wagon load of firewood

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 1, 2000

Wagon Load of Wood

From left, Elmer Anderson, Jack Tamborini, Jack Favini, John Favini and John Kranick. [IHM photo]

Before trucks became the prime mover of firewood, a horse-drawn wagon was the favored mode of transportation. In this photo, circa 1915, Issaquah residents (from left) Elmer Anderson, Jack Tamborini, Jack Favini, John Favini and John Kranick haul wood that appears to be left over from a local cedar shake cutting operation. It is clear based on the muddy wheels, that the road wasn’t paved at this point.

Planer Shed at Monohon Mill

Looking back: Workers at Monohon Mill

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 8, 2000

Planer Shed at Monohon Mill

Planer shed at Monohon Mill in 1943. [IHM photo 91.17.5]

This photograph offers a look into Issaquah’s past as home to several mills. Part of the Issaquah Lumber Co. crew is shown in the planer shed at its Monohon Mill in this circa 1943 photo. The local faces include Floyd Erickson (third from left), who is standing next to his father, Eric Erickson (fourth from left). Members of the Rudstrom family also are in the picture, which illustrates how women stepped into such jobs during World War II (sixth and eighth from left). The Monohon Mill no longer exists, and the Issaquah Lumber Co. is now the Issaquah Cedar & Lumber Co. located on East Lake Sammamish Parkway.

Issaquah School Bus 1935

Looking back: Early School Bus

Published in the Issaquah Press on March 22, 2000

Issaquah School Bus 1935

Issaquah school bus depicted in an “advertisement” in the 1935 Issaquah High School Annual.

One of the Issaquah School District’s earliest buses is pictured in this advertisement in the 1935 yearbook. Heiser added the body to a frame and chassis likely made by the Kenworth Co. you might note that the school district was No. 212 at the time. It was changed to 227 in 1937, and became today’s No. 411 in 1944. Nearly all of the students in the 1930s either rode the bus to school or walked. That’s a stark contrast to today, when student parking lots are consistently overflowing.

Railroad Bridge to Coal Mines on Mine Hill

Looking back: Bridge – circa 1910

Published in the Issaquah Press on April 5, 2000

Railroad Bridge to Coal Mines on Mine Hill

Railroad bridge to coal mines on Mine Hill circa 1919.

During the next few weeks, we’ll look back at some of the community’s better known railroad bridges. In 1910, this bridge was built across the Issaquah Creek near the present-day hatchery. The tracks went from the main line at the depot to the mines on Mine Hill, then looped around to rejoin the main line just behind the existing apartment building at 850 Front St. S. What appears to be a hand car is on the bridge, above the second pillar from the left. In 1923, the rails were removed and the ‘Issaquah loop’ was no longer used. The bridges remained for many years, however.