Gifts


Evening at the Depot

$25.00

Evening at the Depot Image

Numbered prints of a painting by J. Craig Thorpe. Unless you request otherwise, print will be mailed in a poster tube. (Additional postage may apply for other shipping options).

Artist’s Statement
by J. Craig Thorpe
May 1999

“Evening at the Depot” is a 30″x40″ oil-on-canvas painting produced in 1993 at the request of the Issaquah Historical Society. I was paid a commission for the prints which I signed and numbered. Denny Croston, who is still a member of the society, was one of my prime contacts for the work. Warren Wing, a noted NW rail historian, provided additional information.

The work represents a summer evening in 1921 and shows a Seattle-bound special train pausing at Issaquah after a run down the line from North Bend. The P7 class locomotive is a 4-6-0 “ten wheeler” (the numbers refer to the wheel arrangement: 4 pony wheels on the front truck; 6 drive wheels; and no trailing truck wheels). It is typical of passenger engines used on the line by the Northern Pacific in that era. Note also the large, boxy headlight mounted above center on the locomotive’s smoke box. This was not particularly aesthetic, but was the typical NP look! The white flags on the locomotive’s pilot indicate a special move and not a regularly scheduled train. By 1921 there were no more scheduled passenger trains on that line, although specials would occur from time to time. Of course, freights ran regularly until 1998 when the Burlington Northern Santa Fe abandoned the line to Issaquah. The track was pulled out in spring 1999, except for the section from Gilman Blvd to the depot. The coaches are typical open-platform cars which were used on most branch lines at that time. Today, all of rails have been removed beyond the crossing shown behind the station. The track shown curving off to the right, now long-removed, was a spur which served a coal mine near the location of the present fish hatchery.

The open Issaquah Valley Dairy truck was owned by the family of Bill Bergsma, Sr., a longtime Issaquah resident. Bill was still living at the time the painting was produced and told me that he and his sister wrecked the vehicle in the fall of 1921 by driving it into a ditch…neither occupant was hurt! Bill was present at the signing party held at the depot on Sunday 27th June, 1993 when the litho prints were publicly released.

The red brick building to the right, with the pyramidal roof, was the old substation for Puget Power. Transmission lines, not shown, brought power down from the generating station at Snoqualmie Falls.

A humorous story associated with the painting concerns the little dog. Trying to be responsible in preparation for the painting, I research as much as possible….but it never occured to me that I needed to research the dog! The first person who saw the completed prints asked the rep from the historical society what year was represented. When the answer, 1921, was given, the viewer responded by saying that couldn’t possibly be true because the painting shows a golden retriever, and they were not bred in Washington until 1929!

Evening at the Depot

$25.00

Evening at the Depot Image

Numbered prints of a painting by J. Craig Thorpe. Unless you request otherwise, print will be mailed in a poster tube. (Additional postage may apply for other shipping options).

Artist’s Statement
by J. Craig Thorpe
May 1999

“Evening at the Depot” is a 30″x40″ oil-on-canvas painting produced in 1993 at the request of the Issaquah Historical Society. I was paid a commission for the prints which I signed and numbered. Denny Croston, who is still a member of the society, was one of my prime contacts for the work. Warren Wing, a noted NW rail historian, provided additional information.

The work represents a summer evening in 1921 and shows a Seattle-bound special train pausing at Issaquah after a run down the line from North Bend. The P7 class locomotive is a 4-6-0 “ten wheeler” (the numbers refer to the wheel arrangement: 4 pony wheels on the front truck; 6 drive wheels; and no trailing truck wheels). It is typical of passenger engines used on the line by the Northern Pacific in that era. Note also the large, boxy headlight mounted above center on the locomotive’s smoke box. This was not particularly aesthetic, but was the typical NP look! The white flags on the locomotive’s pilot indicate a special move and not a regularly scheduled train. By 1921 there were no more scheduled passenger trains on that line, although specials would occur from time to time. Of course, freights ran regularly until 1998 when the Burlington Northern Santa Fe abandoned the line to Issaquah. The track was pulled out in spring 1999, except for the section from Gilman Blvd to the depot. The coaches are typical open-platform cars which were used on most branch lines at that time. Today, all of rails have been removed beyond the crossing shown behind the station. The track shown curving off to the right, now long-removed, was a spur which served a coal mine near the location of the present fish hatchery.

The open Issaquah Valley Dairy truck was owned by the family of Bill Bergsma, Sr., a longtime Issaquah resident. Bill was still living at the time the painting was produced and told me that he and his sister wrecked the vehicle in the fall of 1921 by driving it into a ditch…neither occupant was hurt! Bill was present at the signing party held at the depot on Sunday 27th June, 1993 when the litho prints were publicly released.

The red brick building to the right, with the pyramidal roof, was the old substation for Puget Power. Transmission lines, not shown, brought power down from the generating station at Snoqualmie Falls.

A humorous story associated with the painting concerns the little dog. Trying to be responsible in preparation for the painting, I research as much as possible….but it never occured to me that I needed to research the dog! The first person who saw the completed prints asked the rep from the historical society what year was represented. When the answer, 1921, was given, the viewer responded by saying that couldn’t possibly be true because the painting shows a golden retriever, and they were not bred in Washington until 1929!