1946

In 1946, Vernon “Babe” Anderson, a lifetime resident of Issaquah, is drafted into the service. #Issaquah125

Handkerchief

1945

In 1945, Rose Koss Croston owned this handkerchief. She had three sons (James, Roy, and Elsworth) who served in the military during World War II. To peruse more World War II objects, visit our museum and our online collection!

Handkerchief

Light green handkerchief, embroidered “Mother USA” with an eagle holding an olive branch and arrows. This handkerchief probably belonged to the donor’s grandmother, Rose Coss Croston, who had three sons (James, Roy, and Elsworth) who served in the military during World War II. [Digital image courtesy of AAM Reinforcement Crew, 2014. IHM 092.002.001]

Wilbur Pickering in uniform in 1944

1944

In 1944, Wilbur Pickering was one of many young men in Issaquah who enlisted to serve their country during World War II. Wilbur served in the Marines.

Wilbur Pickering in uniform in 1944

Wilbur Pickering in 1944. Pickering was one of many young men in Issaquah who enlisted to serve their country during World War II. The wings pinned to his chest and the emblems on his lapel signify that he was a Marine [who flew corsairs off a battleship].[IHM: 024.094.021.016]

1943

In 1943, this ration book was issued to Andy Wold, as World War II continued.

World War II ration book of stamps used to purchase certain items during the war. Was issued to Andrew L Wold by the Office of Price Administration. [IHM 88.010.001]

1942

In 1942, this promotional image was taken at the Issaquah Theatre. From left to right are theatre owner John D. Brunsberg, Lester Alvin “Smiley” Burnette, Gene Autry, and John Daniel “Danny” Brunsberg. This black and white picture was probably a professional public relations shot, taken as part of a personal appearance tour done by Autry and Burnette to promote one of their many films together

Four men of varying ages stand backstage at the Village Theatre in Issaquah in 1942. Left to right: Theatre owner John D. Brunsberg, Lester Alvin “Smiley” Burnette, Gene Autry, and John Daniel “Danny” Brunsberg. The oral history that came with the image is that Danny is 17 in the picture; he was born in 1925. His father, John D., died in 1943. Gene Autry left his Hollywood career for military service in World War II in July of 1942, so this picutre was probably taken earlier that year. The black and white image was probably a professional p.r. shot, taken as part of a personal appearance tour done by Autry and Burnette to promote one of their many films together. They are both in western costume, as they would be for their film characters. The comic Burnette is in a silly hat with extra-large turned-up brim and loose neckerchief over a checked shirt, and Autry is in his trademark white hat above a neat neckerchief, striped and piping decorated shirt, fancy belts and holster. The Brunsbergs were dressed for working the front of the house, with Mr. Brunsberg in a three-piece suit and tie, carrying a white fedora, and Danny in a plaid sports jacket over a loose-necked white shirt. At the left background, in soft focus, two women and another man in western gear are seated. Stage lighting and equipment are visible at the top and right sides of the image. [IHM 2016.018.001]

1941

In 1941, World War II started, and many young men left to join the armed forces. Issaquahns at home helped with the war effort through planting victory gardens, watching for enemy aircraft at the fire station, and selling war bonds.

1940

In 1940, the first floating bridge over Lake Washington was built, making it possible to travel quickly from Issaquah to Seattle.

Although photographs from the mid 20th century seem to show the town of Issaquah as small and timeless, by the 1950s, change was already occurring. The Lake Washington Floating Bridge, the first bridge across the lake, opened in 1940. This new path dramatically shortened the time needed to get from Issaquah to Seattle. The opening of the bridge meant that more Issaquah residents could find employment in Seattle – and that more Seattle residents could move to the east side of Lake Washington and still commute to work. During the 1950s, Seattle’s population dropped from 700,000 to 550,000 as a migration to the suburbs began. This program is a souvenir of the bridge’s dedication ceremony, held July 2, 1940. [IHM 74.009.161]

1939

In 1939, the State of Washington celebrated its Golden Jubilee. Issaquahns celebrated with the rest of the state. Pictured here in their Jubilee Hats are (left to right) Jacob Wilfong, Ray Schneider, Jacob Schomber, Dan Davies, Clint Brady, Walter Ek, G. B. Monce, and George Ek..

[72.021.014.096]

1938

In 1937, Ivor Morgan, the son of an Issaquah coal-miner, attended George Washington Medical school in Washington, DC. This photograph shows Ivor and a classmate practicing their basic skills on each other.

[IHM 2009.014.002]

[IHM 2009.014.002]

Salmon at the Issaquah Hatchery

1937

In 1937, the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, a Works Progress Administration project, is completed. #Issaquah125