McQuade House

McQuade House

McQuade House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

John McQuade, an immigrant to Pennsylvania from Ireland in 1871, was Mayor of Gilman when it’s name was changed to Issaquah in 1899. The intervening years of his life were spent mining gold, silver, and coal from Montana to the Cariboo gold fields in British Columbia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Market

The Market

The Market

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

An architectural solution to an unfinished end led to the emergence of an open air marketplace alive with the color of fresh flowers and produce, the smells of baking croissants and cinnamon rolls and the excitement of discovering foods and wines of the region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don's Drive-In

Don’s Drive-In

Don's Drive-In

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Don’s Drive-In, in its early days a gas station, was typical of the first fast food operations in the country. It served corn dogs on a stick in an atmosphere of early red vinyl. It was renovated in 1976 not only in structural but culinary taste. A new addition toward Gilman Blvd. was added to the original building in February 1978.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Feed Store

The Feed Store

The Feed Store

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Though now standing close to the Mine Warehouse, the Feed Store was once the front, or business end, of the building.

The two-story structure with its traditional frontier false front was an Issaquah landmark dating from 1910 when it was built by E.J. Anderson. For many years it was the supply for grain and hay to local farmers and dairymen.

The building was moved in 1975 along with the warehouse to Gilman Village. As workmen began removing the siding over the false front they discovered the original Fisher Feed sign which remains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mine Superintendent's House

Mine Superintendent’s House

Mine Superintendent's House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

This home has a history of mining and war behind it. Built in 1913 for Count Alvo Von Alvensleben, a tall dark captain in the Kaiser’s Cavalry, it was elegant for its time. There is some question whether the captain actually occupied the home. It was known as Devana to local residents for many years, though no one seems to know why.

The count supposedly was in the Northwest representing the Kaiser’s personal interest in mining when he came to Issaquah to supervise chemicals in mine production. He had previously been working in British Columbia, but was expelled from Canada when war was declared. He came to the United States with the permission of President Wilson.

Some sources say the count was recalled to Germany when we also declared war, but a personal friend of Von Alvensleben reported that he was interned for the duration of the war. He is said to have written a letter of protest daily to the Swiss embassy using Greek or Latin as code. He became a U.S. citizen in 1936.

The house was set on five acres just off Wildwood Boulevard, now the site of condominiums, before it was moved to Gilman Village in 1977. It was built entirely of fir using tongue and groove construction.

The Taylor family of Issaquah bought the house in 1944 and did some remodeling. Many other Issaquah families lived in the home over the years.

When moved to Gilman Village in 1977 it had degenerated into a shabby dwelling known as “Alien Acres”. Though the interior of the house has been changed, the exterior once again reflects the elegance of its beginning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nick's Shop

Nick’s Shop

Nick's Shop

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Nick Schroeder built this shop as a general fix-it workshop in the 1920’s. The lumber was provided by Nick’s brother in Fall City.

The building had an attached blacksmith shop with a combination post drill, whet stone, and post stand grinder operated by a single electrical motor through a combination of changing belts and gears believe to be one of a kind.

During the Depression, Nick repaired the town’s bicycles, cars, logging gear and just about everything else with tools he often improvised himself.

Nick’s Shop was simply moved across the road to be connected to the Pedegana House in 1977.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pedegana House

Pedegana House

Pedegana House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

In 1889 Joseph Pedegana, son of Peter and Mary Pedegana, was born in this house. At that time it was long and thin with a wide front porch and a lean-to kitchen.

The house changed owners in 1903 when the Babik family purchased it and remodeled it further, adding more bedrooms and a shake siding over the original clapboard. Susie Babik was born here and the house remained in the Babik family until the late 1950’s. It was moved to Gilman Village in 1977.

Pedegana House

Back side of the Pedegana House. July 1999 Photo by David Bangs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mine Warehouse

Mine Warehouse

Mine Warehouse

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Stand on the boardwalk a few feet from this building and look down the front of the shops and you will notice a definite curve. This was not the result of some warped siding; it was built that way in 1925 by E.J. Anderson. The building originally was located at the corner of Front and Sunset Way along a spur line of the Northern Pacific Railway. The bend in the building coincides with the bend in the track. Buildings on the other side of the intersection are angled in much the same way.

Historically the building was a warehouse for the hay and feed arriving from eastern Washington. It was also said to store timbers for the mines. It was the business place for the pioneer Wold family for decades.

Under terms of the 50-year lease from the railroad, all buildings had to be removed from the site when the lease expired, April 1, 1975. In March of that year, the warehouse was separated from the main building, cut into four sections and reassembled, curve and all, at the present location.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Monti House

Louis Monti House

Louis Monti House

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

The Monti house was originally a lean-to structure which Louis Monti bought in 1910 to use as the basis for a home for his family. It stood near the old high school, now the site of Issaquah swimming pool, until it was moved in 1975 to make way for the expansion of Issaquah Jr. High.

Small and boxlike, it is typical of the many homes in Issaquah built during the early years of the 1900’s which still dot the residential area adjoining the business district.

 

 

 

 

 

Greyhound Depot

Greyhound Depot

Greyhound Depot

July 1999 Photo by David Bangs

Not all the buildings incorporated into Gilman Village proved salvageable. Gilman Village purchased the Eastside’s only Greyhound Bus Terminal in 1977. When workmen tore away the rotted portions, there was no place to stop. So the building was dismantled to its concrete foundations. Since the design for the renovation had encompassed the original structure, builders simply went ahead as planned with a recontruction of the bus terminal.