Ginko Tree

Ginkgo Tree

90 Front St South

Ginko Tree

August 1999 photo by David Bangs.

This rare Ginkgo tree was planted by Dr. W.E. Gibson (a physician) at the start of the twentieth century. Dr. Gibson became Issaquah’s mayor in 1900 and served several additional terms as mayor and in the state legislature over the next 25 years. His family home was located on this site until it was torn down in 1970. Fortunately, through the efforts of Issaquah High School Students, a petition was drawn up and the tree was saved.

Ginkgo trees belong to one of the oldest tree species on earth (Ginkgo biloba), dating back 150 million years. They were once native to Washington but later became extinct in North America. Specimens cultivated in Chinese ornamental gardens were later reintroduced around the world.

Ginkgo trees (Ginkgo Biloba) are one of the oldest tree species on earth, dating back 150 million years. They were once native to Washington, and until the late 1700s were thought to be extinct. Specimens found in China have since been introduced around the world.

Gibson House

This photograph shows the home of Dr. W.E. Gibson at Front Street South and southeast corner of Andrews Street. The picture was taken before the popular Gingko tree was planted on the site. The Ginkgo tree has since become a city treasure at its visible location at the Downtown Issaquah Plaza. (Issaquah History Museums photo)

In August 1999, a marker table was placed under the tree along with a plaque explaining its history, courtesy of Main Street Issaquah, The City of Issaquah, the Gibson Family, Swanson Arch. Grp, Baima & Holmberg and Morris Piha Mgt. Grp. Based on our records, the historical society believes that several facts listed on this plaque are incorrect. Most notably, Gibson was not the first mayor of Issaquah. He did become mayor briefly to fill an unexpired term in 1900 – less than one year after the name of the town had been changed to “Issaquah” and he went on to serve additional terms as mayor in later years. However, the town’s first mayor was Frank Harrell,who was elected in 1892.

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Grand Central

Grand Central Hotel

58 East Sunset Way

Grand Central

The Grand Central Hotel, summer of 2015. Photo by Cole Good.

When the Grand Central Hotel was constructed, Issaquah was a stopover point for passengers traveling by train from Seattle to Snoqualmie. James Henry Croston, who worked in the mines as a carpenter, built the hotel in 1903 and operated it until his death in 1913. The family eventually sold the hotel in 1920.

Early on, the hotel served as a temporary home to many of  Issaquah’s future residents while they established their homes and businesses in town. Until recently, the building was in sad condition, particularly when compared to photos of its former grandeur. However, in 2003 a local contractor and resident of the Grand Central, Kurt Schlick, began doing restoration and repair work that transformed the building’s facade.

Issaquah is fortunate in that many of its remaining early buildings, such as the Railroad Depot, Pickering Barn, Oddfellows Hall, and Gilman Town Hall have been restored to good condition. The Grand Central, the last remaining of many hotels that served Issaquah early in the century, remains an excellent candidate for future restoration work.

The adjacent Rolling Log Tavern has grown over the years, and now takes up part of the hotel building’s first floor. Originally a favorite hang-out of loggers in the 1930?s, the Rolling Log remains a favorite local pub.

 

History

This hotel is the last of many from Issaquah’s early years. It was built in 1903 as a three story rooming house by James Henry Croston, who operated it until his death in 1913. The Croston family sold the hotel in 1920, and the hotel has had many owners over the years. As of 1999, it is possible to rent a room, but the building is in deplorable condition.

James Henry Croston moved from England to Pennsylvania in 1879, and then to Issaquah in 1893. He worked in the local mines as a carpenter. The Croston family boast some eight generations of carpenters! Denny Croston who operated the Issaquah-based Croston Construction Company still lives in Issaquah today.

In the 1920s, the  “Grand Central Cafe” was added to the west side of the building.

According to a 1931 article in The Issaquah Press, the Grand Central Hotel was being run at that time by Mrs. M.Z. Marion. She was building up a successful business, but there had been “many changes in proprietorship” and a decline in quality from earlier years. Her chief aim was to “bring it back to the position it formerly occupied in the community.”

By 1940, the cafe had become the “Issaquah 10¢ Store.” At this time, the facade of the current “Rolling Log” tavern had been constructed to the west of the hotel, but the tavern had not yet been expanded to take over part of the hotel building.

Walt Seil & his father, Edward “Nogs” Seil (lssaquah’s Marshall) bought the Grand Central Hotel in 1945. According to the Seils, Walt ran the place for about a year; his wife, Olga, did the housekeeping. Later in 1945 Walt Seil went on to work at what turned into a 30 year career at the creosote plant in West Seattle; his parents took over the running of the Grand Central Hotel. Walt & Olga Seil still live in Issaquah today.

The Seils sold the hotel in 1962 to Art Burt, who sold it to John Lydon in 1994, along with the buildings housing the Rolling Log Tavern and the dry cleaning business behind the hotel.

Physical Description
From the 1998 “Issaquah Historic Property Inventory”:

This hotel, currently used as an apartment above and commercial space at the street has seen numerous changes over time that erode at the building’s historic integrity. The building currently has little of its original grandeur.

Asphalt siding was added in the 1940’s; this obscures the original wood siding. And the alterations that have occurred over time could be peeled back to reveal its history; wood porches could be added to replicate the documented original structure. The building in its location and its overall form remain unchanged; this is its essence.

As its name describes, the building was once both “grand” and “central”. The boxy 2 1/2 story large form sits right up to the sidewalk in the most urban way. Originally (now gone) a full attached second story porch was supported by four classic columns and created a covered front entry porch. The hipped roof form still sports small dormers on each side of the building. The soffit is a flat box soffit with medium overhangs. The upstairs has large 2-over-2 double hung windows. Original flat rustic drop siding with comer boards is still visible on the small dormers and at the sides and rear.

Bibliographic References

Issaquah Historical Society files. Issaquah Press March 19,1931. Interview with Walt & Olga Seil by Robin Abrahams & Anne Van Dyne, November 21,1997. Issaquah Press

“Issaquah Family Album: The Croston family”, March 21,1990.

Telephone Interview with Denny Croston by Anne Van Dyne. March 18,1998

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The Grange Mercantile

Grange Mercantile Building

485 Front Street North

The Grange Mercantile

The Grange Mercantile building now houses a series of small shops. (Photo by David Bangs, July 1999)

From the 1998 “Issaquah Historic Property Inventory”:

History

The Grange Mercantile Association was organized by Issaquah Valley Grange No. 581 in 1916 and built this warehouse with large-scale ice-box and refrigeration rooms for general merchandise. The Mercantile Association served the food needs of the Issaquah community for 55 years before closing its doors to economic pressure in 1972. Clem Stefani (youngest son of Frank Stefani) was the last Chairman of the Board. The Grange Mercantile had been in business for 55 years. The upstairs of the building was used as a meeting hall, dance hall, and banquet facility during the years of the Grange Mercantile business.

In the 1970’s, the building housed a whole mall of boutique-type shops.

According to 1986 article in the Issaquah Press, at that time, it housed a gymnastics school, preschool, weight lifting and other fitness businesses and a dry cleaning outlet.

Grange Mercantile building

Grange Mercantile building, rear view. (Photo by David Bangs, 1999)

Building Description

The overall shape of this wood frame structure is a polygon that is composed of a long, rectangular two-story building with a one-story wedge-shape addition that fills the building site. The site is defined by the railroad tracks running at an angle immediately adjacent. The roof of the main building is a medium pitched side gable with five wooden, triangular brackets at each gable end. The original cladding of the building is still visible at the second-story level, but has been replaced with vertical groove plywood at the base and second story. The second story has large, vertically oriented one-over-one double hung windows with plain trim surrounds; these remain unaltered over time. The windows at the street level have been replaced with storefront windows and doors.

Bibliographic References

Issaquah Historical Society files.
Newspaper article from October 20, 1971.
King County Tax Assessor records.

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The Hailstone Schell Station

Hailstone Feed Store

232 Front Street North

The Hailstone Schell Station

The Hailstone Schell Station. Photo by Cole Good, 2015.

On December 18, 2003 the Issaquah Landmarks Commission met at the Issaquah Depot to discuss proposals to name two historic Issaquah buildings as City landmarks. The buildings under discussion were the Depot and the Hailstone Feed Store. Both buildings were granted landmark status.

The feed store building, located on the east side of Front Street, may have been constructed as a residence in the late 1890s. Starting in 1903, Nicholas Burke owned the property and used the building as a warehouse. Burke was the child of Irish immigrants and he operated a grocery store in Issaquah until his death in 1923. The main store was located across the street, where today’s Village Theatre is. After Burke’s death, the warehouse was purchased by Susan Augustan. A 1930 Sanborn insurance map indicates that the building was being used as a grocery store in that year. By 1940 it was being used as a four-room family dwelling.

In 1941, Frank Hailstone and his sister, Nell Hailstone Falkenstein, purchased the building. In 1942 it reopened as the Hailstone Feed Store and Shell Gasoline Station. Frank operated the feed store along with his brother James, and his brother-in-law David Lewis. Nell, who was a widow, operated the gas station. Family members operated the business until 1966. The feed store remained in operation under various owners until 1990.

Nick Burke's Warehouse

Nicholas Burke’s warehouse stands to the right of the railroad tracks. Today, Burke’s warehouse is the Hailstone Feed Store. (IHM 72-21-14-280)

In this circa 1910 photograph of the intersection of Front and Dogwood, the feed store is visible. At this time it was being used as Burke’s warehouse and it bears the sign “N.J. Burke Flour & Feed” (I.H.S. 72.21.14.280)
In 1941, Frank Hailstone and his sister, Nell Hailstone Falkenstein, purchased the building. In 1942 it reopened as the Hailstone Feed Store and Shell Gasoline Station. Frank operated the feed store along with his brother James, and his brother-in-law David Lewis. Nell, who was a widow, operated the gas station. Family members operated the business until 1966. The feed store remained in operation under various owners until 1990.

Hailstone Feed Store

Hailstone Feed Store. Left to right: Frank Hailstone, Nell Hailstone Falkenstein, Emma Greenier Hailstone (ife of James Hailstone). (IHM photo 2001-29-2)

Today the City of Issaquah owns the Hailstone Feed Store building. The Downtown Issaquah Association (DIA) currently leases the building and will restore it to its 1944 appearance. The building will then be used as DIA’s main office, gift store and museum. One of the most exciting discoveries the group has made is an Owl Cigar sign painted on the back of the building. The advertisement would have been easily visible to passengers taking the train in or out of Issaquah, the chief mode of transportation at that time. It was probably applied during the time that Nicholas Burke owned the building.

If you are interested in finding out more about this restoration project, or if you would like to donate time, funds, or materials, contact the Downtown Issaquah Association at 425.392.1112.

Source: City of Issaquah Landmark Registration Form.

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Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Between Mt. Park Boulevard and Sunset Way

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery (Photo by David Bangs, 2002).


Issaquah’s cemetery, located above downtown to the west, is composed of rolling hills with large, mature cedars and heritage trees. The site is visibly tied to the landscape of the forested foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Granite and stone grave markers date from the late 19th Century.

Thirty acres were donated for this cemetery to the City of Issaquah by the Gilman Lodge of the IOOF in 1900. From about 1909-1913, the Women’s Relief Corps took on responsibility for maintaining the cemetery. According to the Seattle Times, “on October 4, 1915, 7 3/4 acres were designated as grave or cemetery area. Graves were sold at not less than $5 and not more than $10 for a lot.”

Citizens important to the history of Issaquah and the surrounding area are buried here, including: Tolle Anderson, Thilda Becker, the Bush family, Frank Joseph Castagno, James Croston, William J. Cubbon, Ivan Darst, Frank Day, Hazel & Walter Ek, Floyd Erickson, Dr. William Gibson, Thomas Gibson, Charles Kinnune, and the Neukirchen family (including Edward, Anna & John).

Veteran's Section at Hillside Cemetery

The upper part of the cemetery is exclusively dedicated to military veterans. The Veterans of Foreign Wars adds crosses and flags each Memorial Day to honor veterans. (Photo by David Bangs, 2002).

There are three sections in the cemetery. The oldest graves are in the front, the new in the middle, and the veterans in the back. The upper part of the cemetery is exclusively dedicated to military veterans. The Veterans of Foreign Wars adds crosses and flags each Memorial Day to honor veterans.

Additional Information

Find-a-Grave listings
Flinftoft’s Funeral Home
Bibliographic References

1998 “Issaquah Historic Property Inventory”
Jeff Childs, Seattle Times, May 30, 1977.
City of Issaquah, Cemetery Deeds Listing 2/21/96.

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IOOF Hall

58 Front Street North

IOOF Hall. Photo by Cole Good, 2015.

This is the oldest remaining commercial structure in Issaquah, having been constructed in 1888 by The Gilman Lodge # 69, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

In addition to serving as lodge and community meeting hall,

From the 1998 “Issaquah Historic Property Inventory”:

History

The Issaquah Odd Fellows Hall was constructed in 1888, the same year that the Issaquah chapter (Gilman Lodge #69) of the International Order of Odd Fellows formed.

Mr. Andy Reynolds, Superintendent of Grand Ridge Coal Mine, and Mr. W.W. Sylvester, President of the Issaquah State Bank, were members, as were most of the businessmen in Issaquah. The Odd Fellows Hall was an important addition to the town in the early days because it provided a central meeting place between the North and South regions.

IOOF Hall with Coronet Band

CIrca 1890s coronet band in front of the IOOF hall. (IHM 91-7-76)

An important addition to the Town of Gilman, the Odd Fellows Hall served as a central meeting place between the north and south regions. The Hall played a vital role in the social life of early Issaquah inhabitants, providing a location for plays and dances. The first moving picture shows in Issaquah were shown at the Hall. In the book, Past at Present, Edward Fish describes the spirit of the community gatherings: “The large affairs held at the Odd Fellows Hall are recalled by many old-timers who danced all night there…”

The first moving picture shows in Issaquah were shown at the hall.  Mrs. Arabella Francis Wilson played the piano for the silent films and her daughter Minnie (Mrs. J.H. Schomber) sang the songs illustrated on slides during intermission. The Moving Picture Show contracted for the regular use of the Hall to have Saturday afternoon 5 and 10 cent matinees & double features at 8p.m. at regular price.

Around 1904, the ground floor to the Hall was rented out as a grocery store and served that purpose with several different owners.  The building was nearly destroyed by an arson attempt in 1908, and later by a severe windstorm in the 1930’s. The International Order of Odd Fellows held meetings in the building into the 1960’s. It has also housed many different businesses ranging from grocery to antique stores and served as an entertainment center showing movies, hosting dances and other entertainment forms.

Recent Chronology

As of 1999 – there are still local members of the International Order of Odd Fellows, but they no longer own or use this building. The lower story is used as an antique store, and the upstairs serves as the surprisingly modern headquarters of Vialight Corporation.

As of April 2000 – The Odd Fellow group in Issaquah has officially disbanded, and the Vialight Corporation has moved on to larger quarters.

As of August 2000 – The building has sold and is now undergoing restoration.  Among other enhancements, it has received a new roof, new backing has been installed on the false front, and the original recessed front entry way is being recreated.

Building Description

Odd Fellows Hall is a uniquely intact example of an early pioneer wood frame commercial structure in Issaquah’s original downtown. It is a 2 story rectangular form with a medium pitched front gable roof and a western tiered false front at the street. The front (west) and north walls are horizontal flat plank siding. The tiered parapet is decorated with 12 scrolled brackets and a wide cornice and frieze. The letters “I O O F” (for International Order of Odd Fellows) with a three link chain appear in wood relief on the top tier of the false front. The tall narrow windows have been sympathetically replaced with 1-over-1 double hung aluminum frame windows. A marquee, not original, is suspended over the storefront which has a pair of French doors centered and plate glass display windows to each side.

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Issaquah Auto Freight Building

Issaquah Auto Freight Building

92 SE Bush Street

Issaquah Auto Freight Building

The former Issaquah Auto Freight warehouse is now use by the Issaquah History Museums as a workshop and collections storage.

One of the Issaquah History Museums’ best kept secrets, the Restoration Shop contains a variety of tools, treasures, and vintage working machinery. Open house visitors can admire a set of Burma Shave signs, one of old Issaquah’s original wooden water pipes, a vintage Fairmont speeder used in track-work and repair, and the Issaquah Volunteer Fire Department’s first hose cart, circa 1915. The Restoration Shop boasts a working forge, antique drill press, and foot-powered grinding stone. Also on display is a 1920s Climax speeder engine, a restored 1948 Ford tractor, and several hit-n-miss engines.

The restoration shop is located in the historic Issaquah Auto Freight building. The building was constructed by the Castagno brothers in the 1930s and used by their Issaquah Auto Freight company as a warehouse and garage. Its heavy roof beams were salvaged from the Black Diamond coal bunkers.

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Issaquah Community Center

Issaquah Community Center

301 Rainier Boulevard S

Issaquah Community Center

Issaquah Community Center (Photo courtesy of David Bangs, 2000)

The community center, both inside and out, is the center of Issaquah’s Parks and Recreation activities. Some of the inside amenities include a computer lab, fitness area, running track, sports courts, and youth center. The expansive front lawn is the home of frequent summer music concerts, and the City puts together outdoor programs such as “Beat the Heat” splash days and chalk art festivals.
Inside, the community center has a lot of flexible open space. The bulk of the building is filled with three multi-purpose sports courts. A visitor on a typical day may see basketball players in one court, an aerobics class in another, and toddlers playing with large toys in the other. The dividers can be removed for large events, such as the annual Kiwanis auction. The courts are ringed with a second floor running track – the walls of which are lined with historic photos of Issaquah.

Issaquah Community Center, interior

Issaquah Community Center, interior. (Photo courtesy of David Bangs, 2000).

Issaquah Community Center - interior

A brightly colored quilt hanging in the front lobby of the Community Center depicts prominent elements of the town, including the Depot, State Salmon Hatchery, Issaquah Creek, the Village Theatre, and the Darigold Creamery. The quilt was made by the Issaquah Quilters, and took more than two years to complete.

A brightly colored quilt hanging in the front lobby of the Community Center depicts prominent elements of the town, including the Depot, State Salmon Hatchery, Issaquah Creek, the Village Theatre, and the Darigold Creamery. The quilt was made by the Issaquah Quilters, and took more than two years to complete.

History

Construction of the community center began in 1995, and was completed in 1997. The design of the building was inspired by a number of historical photographs. Of particular interest to the planning committee were photos of old mining facilities, the railroad depot, and the original Issaquah school house building. The old wood frame school house (1889-1915) was originally located behind and above the new community center building, at the current site of Issaquah Middle School. It’s double tower symmetrical design was apparently an inspiration to the designers of the community center.

Issaquah's First School

This wood frame school house (1889-1915) was located behind and above the new community center building, at the current site of Issaquah Middle School. It’s double tower symmetrical design was apparently an inspiration to the designers of the community center.

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Darigold & Issaquah Creek

Issaquah Creamery (Darigold Plant)

611 Front St N

Darigold Plant

Darigold Plant (Photo by David Bangs, 2001)

Issaquah’s Darigold Plant has been site of the continuous operation of a dairy facility since 1909. In that year, it was opened as the “Northwestern Milk Condensing Company” by a group of local businessmen looking for an outlet for the area’s dairy farms. Under the auspices of the Commercial Club, Tolle Anderson and other leading Issaquah citizens organized the Northwestern Milk Condensing Company. The business was incorporated by George M. Clark as president, Dr. William Gibson as secretary, John Anderson as treasurer, P.J. Smith, and A.F. Giese on May 29th, 1908. Early activities included condensing milk, manufacturing butter, making ice, and canning fruit and vegetables — all for the Seattle market. Later known as the Issaquah Creamery and then the Alpine Dairy, the plant was Issaquah’s largest employer at the time it became part of the Darigold Cooperative in the early 1960’s. As dairy plants in other towns were closed, Issaquah’s plant expanded and took over butter production for the whole area in 1970. Today, the plant produces sour cream and cottage cheese in addition to butter.

Issaquah's Creamery

Issaquah’d Creamery, circa 1910

The business eventually capitalized at $25,000, and divided into 250 shares valued at $100 each. The business thrived at this location for 5 years, then was leased to others until local owners again acquired the business in the 1930’s. Renamed Issaquah Creamery, the business enlarged its physical plant at the site, and opened a Seattle distributing plant on Rainier Avenue South in 1932. Later known as Alpine Dairy, the business merged with Darigold in the early 1960’s. At that time, it was Issaquah’s leading employer.

[The following text is adapted from the Issaquah Historical Society’s 1998 “Historic Properties Inventory”]
The Darigold Cooperative has an important place in the history of successful dairy cooperatives. Darigold’s umbrella spanned from Enumclaw to Mount Vernon, from Lynden to Chehalis and beyond. The history of the Issaquah plant is part of this wider story. The 1950’s saw numerous plants closed and other closures followed during the 60’s and 70’s. But in 1970 the Issaquah plant took over butter production for the whole area; a spray dryer had been in operation here since 1957.

Darigold Farms was the last major railroad customer in Issaquah after the line was truncated in the early 70’s. Trains would make a special trip down the east shore of Lake Sammamish just to visit the plant until the tracks were abandoned in the late 1990’s. Locals referred to this trip as “the butter train.” Although the butter train stopped running in the late 1990s, Issaquah’s plants has continued to produce and distribute yogurt (for the most part) to Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

The current plant is a complex of buildings and additions accrued over the decades. An auxiliary wood frame building from the original plan is still visible in the complex adjacent to the railroad tracks on the west side of the site. Warehouse buildings with metal siding and multi-pane industrial-sash windows and covered loading docks were built in the 1930’s; they are relatively unaltered today. The series of buildings and additions constructed in the later 1950’s and early 1960’s are of concrete block with low-pitched or flat roofs. The buildings on the site are generally plain, box-like and utilitarian, punctuated by the towering milk silos. There is a large truck staging area on the northern portion of the facility.

Dairy Mural, left panel

Dairy Mural, left panel

Dairy Mural, center panel

Dairy Mural, center panel

Dairy Mural, right panel

Dairy Mural, right panel

In 1995, artists painted a large mural on the dairy’s large wall, which faces Front Street. The mural is titled “A Century of Dairying in Issaquah,” and commemorates the Issaquah Valley’s rich dairy history. The work was a collaboration of artists Larry Kangas, Nichole Parsons and Evan Jones. Prominently depicted are the creamery as it originally appeared (left), and the Pickering family’s dairy barn and farm (center).
Bibliographic References
Issaquah Historical Society files; King County Tax Assessor records; Satterfield, Archie. The Darigold Story: The History of a Dairy Cooperative in the Pacific Northwest, Darigold, Seattle, WA, 1993.
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Gilman's Depot, circa 1892

Issaquah’s Northern Pacific Depot

78 First Avenue NE

Issaquah Depot Museum

Issaquah Depot Museum

Issaquah’s Depot was constructed in 1889, and helped to transform the small farming community into a bustling coal town. It was originally built under the auspices of Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway, but became part of the Northern Pacific network after the Panic of 1893 shut down the SLS&E. In the 1980s, the Issaquah Historical Society lobbied the City to purchase the historic building, after which volunteers spent more than a decade restoring the building. The Depot was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.  A detailed timeline of the Depot’s use and construction appears below.

Today, you can visit the Issaquah Depot to admire a classic restoration, see exhibits about Issaquah’s past, ride the Issaquah Valley Trolley, and much more.

Gilman's Depot, circa 1892

Gilman’s Depot, circa 1892.(IHM 86-87-18)

Selected chronology of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway, and Northern Pacific North Bend line. From the notes of Dale Martin Jr. Information sources are listed in {} brackets.

1885 April 29Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Ry. incorporated {BN}
1887 February Construction begins on SLS&E {RENZ}
1887Tracks reach Woodinville
1888 SpringSLS&E affiliate Seattle Coal & Iron Co. begins coal mining in Gilman and shipping by rail.
1889Gilman station constructed
1889 DecemberOperations reach Sallal Prairie (63 miles from Seattle) – end of construction
1890 May 23Northern Pacific RR acquires control of SLS&E stock {RENZ}
1892 May 1SLS&E operations consolidated with those of NP {RENZ}
1893Nationwide “panic” (economic depression) begins, and lasts four years.
1893 June 30SLS&E bankruptcy= enters receivership {BN}
1893 AugustN P bankruptcy= enters receivership {RENZ}
1894SLS&E passenger service on North Bend line is daily except Sunday Seattle to Gilman takes 2 hours, Seattle to North Bend 3 hours 5 min Round trip to Seattle requires an overnight stay in Seattle
1896 July 28SLS&E properties sold by bondholders’ committee to Seattle & International Ry. Sale finalized July 1897. {BN}
1896 AugustNorthern Pacific Railway reorganization completed {RENZ}
1898 JanuaryNP buys bonds of S&I regaining control of SLS&E properties in western Washington {RENZ}
1899 Gilman renamed Issaquah
1900Puget Sound Lumberman Magazine ran an interesting article about life Along the Seattle & International.
1901 March 21NP Ry. absorbs Seattle & International Ry. short-line identity of track through Issaquah disappears
1902Issaquah trestle rebuilt at a cost of $8,792 {Times}
1904 JuneLake Washington belt line of NP completed through Renton and Kirkland: eventually North Bend branch passenger trains ran this way (instead of through Fremont and Kenmore). adding ten miles and one-half hour to an Issaquah-Seattle rail ride. {BN}
1904 OctoberNP passenger service from Seattle to North Bend takes 2 hrs. 55 min. each way. Round trip to Seattle in one day with a 7 hr. 50 min. lay over in Seattle.
1909Milk condensary established in Issaquah. It and successor operations on this site are the longest-lived rail shippers in Issaquah (now Darigold)
1909 October 22The October 22, 1909 Issaquah Press notes that as of October 17, round trip fare from Issaquah to Seattle has increased to $2.00.
1910s Much improvement to roads in Western King County; new ferries across Lake Washington; auto stage businesses flourish
1914Issaquah-Renton-Seattle Auto Stage advertises Issaquah-Seattle service in 1 hr. 10 min. Three round trips daily
1915 FebruaryNP Seattle-North Bend passenger trains (via Renton) daily. Seattle to Issaquah takes 2 hrs 30 min. Round trip to Seattle in one day, with a 2 hr 30 min layover in Seattle
1917 December 28 — 1920 MarchU.S. government controls and operates railways.
1918 January 1”North Bend & Seattle” Railway Post Office ends – end of mail sorting on the passenger train through Issaquah
1920Grand Ridge coal mine closed (Central Coal Co.)
1920 NP builds new 54,120 gallon wooden water tank at the junction of the main line and the coal mine loop south of town. A wooden water pipe supplies the tank from Cabin Creek on Squak Mountain above the coal mine. The tank is 37 feet high at the top and is used to supply water to the steam engines as well as several neighboring houses. {added by Eric Erickson}
1922NP ends Seattle-Renton-Woodinville-Issaquah North Bend scheduled passenger service
1923 Pacific Coast Coal Co. closes major coal mine in Issaquah area; mine loop track south of station mostly dismantled.
1928 February 22N. P. Logging Train wrecks (no injuries) just wrecked log cars and track) while going west behind High Point Hotel. {added by Eric Erickson}
1929 JanuaryIssaquah Station agent Jim O’Connor moves to Arlington. {added by Eric Erickson}
1930Mr. Harvey is Issaquah Station Agent. In November, Mike Procaccio – Issaquah Section Foreman for the past year – is replaced by Joe Rogerson. {added by Eric Erickson}
1938NP ends Seattle-Fremont-Woodinville-Bellingham scheduled passenger service
1939U. S. highway 10 widened to four lanes. Issaquah trestle altered with concrete piers and deck plate girder span {Times}
1956 April 16June 21, 1956 Issaquah Press reports that, “On April 16 a shiny orange diesel, locomotive rolled the freight train along the Northern Pacific tracks through Issaquah.” Originally built for the CB&Q, by Electromotive (a division of GM), the #558 replaced the #1372 steam engine that had served Issaquah for many years. {added by Eric Erickson}
1956 December 2First Casey Jones excursion: Seattle-Snoqualmie round trip was pulled by the 4-6-0 Locomotive number 1372 + 13 cars+ GP7. It carried 1,300 passengers. {Times}
1957 June 29Casey Jones excursion: Seattle-Snoqualmie round trip
1958 May 23NP closes Issaquah station agency {BN}
1959 December 6 Casey Jones excursion: Seattle-North Bend round trip. {CJ map}
1968 June 9 Last Casey Jones excursion. Seattle-North Bend round trip. {Times}
1970 March 1Burlington Northern RR formed from a merger of NP, GN, CB&Q, SP&S, PC
197-BN abandons former SLS&E: Lake Union-Woodinville route becomes the Burke-Gilman trail. 12.1 miles long.
1974BN abandons Issaquah-Snoqualmie Falls: gets running rights over Milwaukee to Snoqualmie.
1975 JanuaryIssaquah trestle dismantled. {Times}
1981 JuneBN announces that Redmond-Issaquah track is under study for abandonment. {Times}
1983Issaquah Historical Society commits to restore the Issaquah Depot as the society’s main project. Depot is in deplorable condition at this time. {added by David Bangs}
1984 March City of Issaquah buys former NP depot.
June 1994Issaquah Historical Society dedicates remodeled Historic Train Depot as a museum. {added by David Bangs}
1989Weyerhaeuser closes Snoqualmie sawmill. Rail freight service to Snoqualmie-North Bend ends.
1990Issaquah station listed on the National Register of Historic Places
June 1995Depot is included in Inventory And Evaluation of Historic Properties Associated with Transportation in Washington State by Florence K. Lentz. Field Site # PS3-O24-R {added by Eric Erickson}
1998BN abandons Redmond-Issaquah track. Track and right-of-way is sold to King County’s Land Conservancy for eventual conversion to trails. {added by David Bangs}
May 2001Issaquah Historical Society conducts experimental trolley service, allowing passengers to tour Issaquah between the Depot and Gilman Blvd. The vintage Oporto trolley car was on loan from the City of Yakima, and operated from the Issaquah Depot for one year.{added by David Bangs}
2013Issaquah Valley Trolley service begins aboard the organization’s restored trolley car. Summer trolley service continues to be part of the IHM’s programming.

{BN} – Burlington Northern
{Times} – Seattle Times
{RENZ} – Louis Tuck Renz, author of book, The History of the Northern Pacific Railroad, printed in 1980