317 NW Gilman Blvd

Gilman Village

David Bangs, May 1999

The Gilman Village Story

Gilman Village is a union of old buildings with a new purpose. The idea began in 1972 when Betty Konarski and Marilyn Gray convinced developers Marvin and Ruth Mohl that unwanted buildings could be saved, moved and refurbished to create an attractive business district. While the buildings all have a history, they have been given a new life in a great example of adaptive reuse.

The Buildings

Gilman Village consists of 28 buildings – most of which are historic. For more information about Gilman Village, and the shops contained in each building, see the main Gilman Village web site. Most of the text for each building has been quoted (with some updates) from the brochure, The Gilman Village Story, which is available at the Gilman Village office and the visitors center. Used by permission. All photos taken by David Bangs in 1999.


Day House

Day Garage and House

William Day worked on Mine Hill (Squak Mountain) during the boom times of Issaquah’s mining days. In 1914, he built this house for his son, Frank, and Frank’s new wife, Alberta. Their daughters June and Alice were born here. World War 1 took Frank to Alaska as a truck driver. To provide added income, Alberta […]

A. P. Burrows House

A. P. Burrows House

This house has had many occupants, A.P. Burrows, founder of Issaquah’s first newspaper, The Issaquah Independent, built it for his family sometime between 1900 and 1912. Soon after its completion, a Mr. DeChesne, a high school French teacher, his sister and mother rented it from Burrows. Two years later, Mr. and Mrs. Albin Ek took […]

Smart Garage

Smart Garage

Lawrence and Lulu Smart lived in this garage in 1913 while Lawrence was building their new home. In 1914, they converted the building into a storage area for coal and wood and allowed enough space to park their Anderson, a stylish touring car, which was their first vehicle.               […]

Smart House

Smart House

Lawrence and Lulu Smart owned this house from 1914, the year he built it, until the family fell on hard times during the Depression. Lawrence worked at the local milk canning plant, then called Alpine Creamery, now Darigold. In 1916, when Lulu got sick the couple moved in with parents on the Anderson Farm where […]

Huovar House

Huovar House

Representing a type of architecture known as a “miner’s house,” this modest cottage is believed to have been built around 1910 by a Finnish carpenter. The house was first moved during a road revision and land exchange, ending up at what is now Front Street and Gilman Blvd. Located next door was the Huovar Motel. The Huovar […]

Wold House

Wold House

Lars Arndt Wold, his wife, Henrietta, and children Mary, Andrew, Ludwig and Sena, made their home here in 1908. The house (called “The Wold” in the community) is the only building in Gilman Village which remains in its original location. Except for the deck entrance, the exterior remains unchanged. The large handmade railings with the graceful curves were […]

The Granary

The Granary

Part of a working farm is keeping the animals fed and healthy. The granary was the storage for feed for the family’s chickens which used to roam the orchard. It stands in its original location. The Wold property itself is bounded on the west by Issaquah Creek.                 […]

Hop Shed

Hop Shed

Sometimes saving a tree has played as important a part in developing Gilman Village as saving a building. A case in point is the tower-like building between the Wold Barn and Granary. To avoid cutting down the venerable oak tree located there, the Baylis Architects designed a structure reminiscent of the hop sheds which were […]

Wold Barn

Wold Barn

Though a little larger than when first built, the Wold barn is just a few yards from its home site. The barn was a 1908 project of the Wold family, pioneers of the Issaquah Valley. When it became part of Gilman Village in 1979 it was completely dismantled, moved, expanded, and reassembled using as much […]

Court House

Court House

This charming home graced the S.W. corner of Dogwood and Rainier Blvd. from 1890 to 1979. Constructed by a man named Putnam (probably either Meyers or George Frank Putnam), the home remains basically the same today as when first built. The only change has been the addition of a full front porch instead of a […]

McQuade House

McQuade House

John McQuade, an immigrant to Pennsylvania from Ireland in 1871, was Mayor of Gilman when it’s name was changed to Issaquah in 1899. The intervening years of his life were spent mining gold, silver, and coal from Montana to the Cariboo gold fields in British Columbia.                   […]

The Market

The Market

An architectural solution to an unfinished end led to the emergence of an open air marketplace alive with the color of fresh flowers and produce, the smells of baking croissants and cinnamon rolls and the excitement of discovering foods and wines of the region.                    

Don's Drive-In

Don’s Drive-In

Don’s Drive-In, in its early days a gas station, was typical of the first fast food operations in the country. It served corn dogs on a stick in an atmosphere of early red vinyl. It was renovated in 1976 not only in structural but culinary taste. A new addition toward Gilman Blvd. was added to […]

The Feed Store

The Feed Store

Though now standing close to the Mine Warehouse, the Feed Store was once the front, or business end, of the building. The two-story structure with its traditional frontier false front was an Issaquah landmark dating from 1910 when it was built by E.J. Anderson. For many years it was the supply for grain and hay […]

Mine Superintendent's House

Mine Superintendent’s House

This home has a history of mining and war behind it. Built in 1913 for Count Alvo Von Alvensleben, a tall dark captain in the Kaiser’s Cavalry, it was elegant for its time. There is some question whether the captain actually occupied the home. It was known as Devana to local residents for many years, […]

Nick's Shop

Nick’s Shop

Nick Schroeder built this shop as a general fix-it workshop in the 1920’s. The lumber was provided by Nick’s brother in Fall City. The building had an attached blacksmith shop with a combination post drill, whet stone, and post stand grinder operated by a single electrical motor through a combination of changing belts and gears […]

Pedegana House

Pedegana House

In 1889 Joseph Pedegana, son of Peter and Mary Pedegana, was born in this house. At that time it was long and thin with a wide front porch and a lean-to kitchen. The house changed owners in 1903 when the Babik family purchased it and remodeled it further, adding more bedrooms and a shake siding […]

Mine Warehouse

Mine Warehouse

Stand on the boardwalk a few feet from this building and look down the front of the shops and you will notice a definite curve. This was not the result of some warped siding; it was built that way in 1925 by E.J. Anderson. The building originally was located at the corner of Front and […]

Louis Monti House

Louis Monti House

The Monti house was originally a lean-to structure which Louis Monti bought in 1910 to use as the basis for a home for his family. It stood near the old high school, now the site of Issaquah swimming pool, until it was moved in 1975 to make way for the expansion of Issaquah Jr. High. […]

Greyhound Depot

Greyhound Depot

Not all the buildings incorporated into Gilman Village proved salvageable. Gilman Village purchased the Eastside’s only Greyhound Bus Terminal in 1977. When workmen tore away the rotted portions, there was no place to stop. So the building was dismantled to its concrete foundations. Since the design for the renovation had encompassed the original structure, builders simply went ahead […]

Schomber Garage

Schomber Garage

Built in 1922, the Schomber garage has evolved from garage to barn to tiny shop to a whole new wing of Gilman Village. The newly created building provided a comfortable transition between the old houses along the deck to the roadway, Gilman Blvd.        

Dons Quick Stop

Don’s Quick Stop

Two sisters, Emily Darst Walker and Inez Darst Gunderson, ran the Swanee Grocery along what is now Gilman Boulevard for years. Later residents remember it as Don’s Quick Stop. It was part of a rapidly deteriorating assortment of odds and ends once cited by IREQ (Issaquah Residents for Environmental Quality) as the worst looking commercial […]

Schomber House II

Schomber House II

One of the most charming stories of Gilman Village is the story of the rhododendron. It was planted in front of the second Schomber house when it was completed in 1936 by Henry Schomber, son of the Issaquah baker, next door to the family home on Front Street. When the Schomber home was moved to […]

Schomber House

Schomber House

The Schomber House is another twice-moved Gilman Village treasure. It was built in 1900 along Front Street beside the family bakery. The house was relocated in 1921 on the site now housing Rainier Bank. During the moving, Harry Schomber, a boy at the time, slept nights in the upstairs of the house. The house’s original […]

Anderson House II

Anderson House II

This was the permanent family home built by Albert Anderson, a native of Issaquah. The exact date of construction is not clear, but it was probably completed in the late 1920’s. The house has architecturally the same exterior, with its notable three-peaked roof, as when it was moved from its former location (across from the […]

Livingstone House

Livingston House

Jake Jones constructed this farmhouse for in-laws in 1913. They farmed the surrounding area until 1940 when the completion of the first Seattle-Mercer Island floating bridge introduced the four-lane era to the Issaquah Valley. In the process, the Livingstone farm was bisected, making farming a losing proposition. The house was moved to a three-acre section […]

Anderson House

Anderson House

This 1925 bungalow was built by Albert Anderson as temporary quarters for his family while he worked on their permanent home. A small side room was added in the 1930’s to rent to tenants. The house was located on Front Street to the north of Issaquah Creek, where it remained until it was moved to […]

Trigg House

Trigg House

This 1909 house was the real start of Gilman Village. Built by Alfred Morris and Jack Trigg, it has been moved twice. The home first stood where the Darigold plant is now located. It was moved in 1932 by the owner, Louis Krall, to allow for the expansion of the old creamery building to include […]