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Hockey Game, circa 1930

Les Adair

Hockey Game, circa 1930

Circa 1930. From left to right are: Ruth Campbell (standing behind Archie Adair),
Archie Adair V, Lester Adair, James Bonner, Jr., William Bonner, Joseph Anthony Donlan. (IHM 2008-4-1)

Name: Lester J. Adair

Birth Date or Year (optional): 3/1/1914

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:
My granddad settled the property in 1903. The family has lived on this property ever since.
If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?
It was home.
Issaquah or area school(s) attended:
Issaquah Elementary beginning in 1920 when I was 6 years old and graduated in 1933 from Issaquah High School.
Family History in Issaquah:
Our family history is discussed in the Family Book.
Education—Coming of Age
What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?
Ernest Edgerton, taught the sciences; chemistry, physics and physical geography.
Lawrence Jenson, taught manual training.  Mr. Jenson was trained in Sweden and had a wonderful knowledge of woodworking and how to impart that knowledge.
Miss Eades, biology teacher.  Along with lab and classroom work, she took the class on field trips, pointing out that which others would have missed.
Harold Byrd, typing teacher, saw to it that you learned how to type, get your class work done, and do the exercises that made your fingers more accurate.
Miss Wager taught foreign languages such as Spanish and French.
Jim Stevens taught oral English.  His classes were really interesting because he was able to teach some of the girls who were really shy how to overcome their shyness, and speak in front of the class.  One girl in particular was so shy she could hardly speak in class.  With his training and methods, she soon was able to carry on her class work just about like everybody else in class.
The training that we got from these fine teachers had a direct bearing on how we communicate with other people as we grew up.
What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?
Minnie was originally the first grade teacher of my brother.  I ran into her years later when  I was working on a WPA project and she had to sign the various forms as representative of the City.
What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?
I lettered in football and track.  I was too busy elsewhere for anything else.
Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?
Hiking, hunting, fishing. rockhounding.
We didn’t get into mischief that would get us into trouble.  Dad made it very plain that how we were to deal with other people and other people’s property.  He was a good Dad, but a strict Dad.
Local Businesses
What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?
Grange Mercantile, Fishers Meats, Grange Supply
What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?
Dave Lewis’ Barbershop.  (one of my best friends that I did a lot of hunting and fishing with.)
What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?
We purchased fishing tackle, ammunition for hunting trips, Hunting and fishing Regulation books.
Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?
Tony and Johnny’s for a long time, Red and White (Leonard Miles store) and Grange Mercantile. (Also, there was a Money Savers)
Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?
All of our groceries were purchased there.  We rented the storage locker and kept it full, both of meat and fruit.  Pick Pickering, the manager, was shot during hold-up there, about 1930.
What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to? 
We stopped in the Honeysuckle of Tom Drylie’s once in a while.
Did you go to Rena’s Café, (Rena made the best pie’s in town) or XXX Root beer?  
Not very often
What was your favorite food?
Clam chowder
Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?
No
What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?
I had no tolerance for hard liquor and don’t like beer, so I didn’t go in those places.
What do you remember about Grange Supply?
The Grange handled many things for the people.  In 1956 when our neighborhood had to renew our well, Mr. Stickney, the manager of the Grange, was very helpful in telling us all the various things we’d need.
Anything in the way of nuts and bolts, you got it at the Grange Supply.
What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?
I knew both Lou and Gertie because they were friendly people.  They always helped you to find things on the shelf.  Years later, Marcia and I were down at Westport having dinner.  To our surprise, up walked Lou who was the pharmacist at the Westport local drug store to say hello.
Local Politics
What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office? 
The presence of the WPA in Issaquah made a difference in the lives of many Issaquah people who were out of work because of the Depression.  Most of that time, I spent in the WPA office as a typist.   Jerry Marquis was the accountant.  We handled all the paperwork for the sidewalks, cemetery improvement, watershed, and city sewers.
Issaquah was also known as having the highest number of moonshine stills in the county, in the hills around the town… some no more than a mile from City Hall.
What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?
My only memory of Stella Alexander was when I was advised by a farmer in the area to take my sick hunting dog to her since she was raised on a farm and knew how to take care of animals.  With her help, I managed to get my dog through a very severe case of distemper.  He was an ugly beast but the best hunting dog I ever owned.
The Great Depression
What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?
The Great Depression was a tragedy for the average working man who became unemployed because of lack of work.  I saw kids wearing the same dress all week long at school because they didn’t have anything else.  The boys were no better off.
I managed to pay for most of my school expenses and clothes with money that I earned trapping; mink, muskrat, skunk, weasel.  One skunk hide earned $7.50.  What I earned increased dramatically when I learned to prepare the hides.
What ways did you try to save money?
We went to the movies when it was dime night.  My mother and Dad spent the summers canning everything they could find, for the winter.
What did you eat?
We ate fairly well because we always raised a cow, hogs and chickens.  I raised ducks.  We always had a big garden.  I did a lot of hunting.  Ba-Ba was our milk cow, though she was considered a pet.  My Mom and Dad just about died when they had to take her to Fishers.
World War II
How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?
It had a dramatic effect on the town people because suddenly, they had to commute so far to work.
Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  
Kenneth Kobukata, a Japanese-American, lived and worked on a farm on the Plateau owned by Mr. Best.
How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?
The Kobukata family was sent to an Internment Center in Idaho, I believe.
Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations
What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?
This was usually when the rodeo was put on.  Races, bucking horses, chariot races, bulldogging, carnivals along the west-side of Memorial Field (where the Library is now).
Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?
No
What are your memories of the Rodeo? 
See above
Special Occasions
What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?
In about 1920, there was a KKK rally down by Goode’s Corner.  At a given signal, the men were to remove their headdresses.  They did.  I was surprised to see some of the men who had hidden behind the mask.
Outdoor Recreation
Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail? 
The trail along the power long to Round Lake and Lake Tradition.
What type of fish did you catch? 
Trout, Kokanee, catfish, perch, bass, steelhead.  Those were the legal catches.
In order to make home canned eggs to fish with, other fish were “snagged” out of the Issaquah Creek and it’s tributaries.
How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?    Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?
You might say so.
What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there? 
We had a lot of fun swimming there.
Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?
Yes
Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter? 
Yes and had some wonderful times.  There was always a fire out by the lake and we were always made to feel welcome.
Logging and Sawmills
How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?
Kept a lot of guys working.  I didn’t work for one.  My Dad told me to get a job in the mill where I could make pretty good money.  He thought the woods were too dangerous.
Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?
I remember every one of them.  I worked for Carl Pearson at the Monohon Mill.
Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?
I saw the first one, in about 1926.  The heat was so intense, the railroad tracks were distorted and had to be replaced.
Farming and Dairy
Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there? 
We always had a garden.  I planted corn, potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, cauliflower, carrots.  My Mother and I used to can everything we could.
Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold? 
After I retired from the Seattle Fire Department, I went to work for Darigold driving truck on the night shift in 1968.  I worked there 8 years before retiring 1968 – 1976.
Railroad—Transportation
Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?
Yes, every day that I drove Engine 25 in the Fire Department.
How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?
It made it possible for people to get to Seattle quicker without having to go through Renton first.
What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?
1937 Chev Davies Chevrolet on Pike Street.
Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls
What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?
I belonged to the Knights of Pythias for a short time but I couldn’t make the meetings having to work some night shifts.
Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?
Yes.
The original location, down near Pickering curve, was in a poor location for trap shooting so the “Gun Club” bought the property up by the old garbage dump.  We never called it a Sportsmen’s Club.
A friend and I helped level ground move rocks, etc. at the new location when someone came out and asked if anyone could type.
What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?
Bill Doherty asked me if I knew how to run an Emerson resuscitator.  I told him yes, that we had one on the SFD rig.  IVFD had one but no one in the fire department here knew how to use it.  I showed them how.
Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?
Yes.  Our family used to have Christmas there when our family got too big to be in one house.
Mining
Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?
Caroline mine caught on fire as a result of a forest fire so the mine was closed for a time.  My Uncle, Pete Favini had to go in to check to make sure that the fire was out.  We were in the tunnel 2-300 yards (a guess) when Pete asked me how long the flame was on his miner’s hat.
My response was, “Too long”.  (Flame reaches out for oxygen when there is little available).  We hurried out.
The mine stayed closed.
What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?
I didn’t work in the Issaquah mines.
Entertainment
What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss? 
Birth of a Nation.  For me, it was scary because I was very young.  One night it was a dime.  Other nights it was 15 cents.  George Brunsberg held drawings once a week.  The winner received a sack full of groceries.
Churches
What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?
Bethel Mission.  Mr. Case was the father of Cliff Case and Reid Case (who was married to Roberta Thompson) and a minister.  Mr. Case was the one who organized the boys club that was held in the church across the street from Darigold.  The boys club met in the basement.
I had great respect and admiration for Rev. Lois Hines who ministered at the Bethel Mission.
Additional Memories
In the early 1950s, around 10 or 11 o’clock at night, we heard a plane engine roaring and a very loud boom.   Flames were easily seen to the South from my house.  Since I was a fireman, I went to help.  A passenger airplane had hit Squak Mountain across the Issaquah Hobart Road from where the hang gliders land.  There weren’t any survivors.
AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)
Lester J. Adair

Back to the Memory Books

Kerry Anderson (left) with Mayor Keith Hansen

Kerry Anderson

Kerry Anderson (left) with Mayor Keith Hansen

Kerry Anderson (left) with Mayor Keith Hansen

Name: Kerry and Barbara Anderson

Education—Coming of Age
Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?
Park Dept built swimming pool on site of old High School 1971.
Local businesses
What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?
In early 1970 Park Department purchased items from businesses on Gilman Blvd.:
Hi Lo
Grange
Seven Firs
Rental Business.
Had lunch at Don’s Drive-In.
In 1971 we planted the first trees on Gilman and Rainier Avenue.
What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?
Park Department had account from 1971.
What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?
1.      Don’s Drive-In
2.      Foothills
3.      Fasano’s
4.      Water hole Tavern
5.      H.H. Tavern
Local Politics
What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?
I worked for following Mayors:
Keith Hansen
Herb Herrington
A.J. Culver
Rowan Hinds
Ava Frisinger.
All five mayors very hard working / put lots of hours in each week.
Outdoor Recreation
Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?
Park Department partner chipped with state and county purchased 30,000 acres for Park Open Space—Tiger Mountain / Squak Mountain / Cougar Mountain.
Additional Memories
I was City Park Director from 1971 to 2000.
Accomplishments:
A.     Tibbett Valley Park
B.     Gilman Blvd. Landscaping
C.     Rainier Landscaping
D.     Tibbett Creek manor
E.      Issaquah Community Center
F.      Swimming Pool Revamping
G.     Open Space Acquisition
H.     Issaquah Creek Acquisition
I.        Comprehensive Recreation Programs.
Issaquah was a wonderful community to work in for 28 years:
A.     Wonderful history of park recreation activities prior to 1970
B.     Hard working mayors and council
C.     Great park boards
D.     Great staff
E.      Supportive residents
F.      Great collaboration with schools, state and King county.
AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)
Kerry Anderson, Issaquah Park and Recreation Director 1971 – 2000
Donna Pedegana in her senior portrait, 1948.

Donna Pedegana Arndt

Name:Donna Pedegana Arndt

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I was born here.  In a house on Andrews St. At the time Andrews St. only went ½ block east from 3rd.  Then it was a field, and blackberry briers.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

I married a fellow living here in 1948.  He worked in the woods as a logger.  It was also close to fishing and hunting.  That helped to feed us for many years.

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Issaquah Grade School.  There was only one for all 8 grades.  Then Issaquah High School.

Family History in Issaquah:

My father was born in Issaquah.  My mother was born in Sumas, Washington.  My dad was a coal miner most of his life.  Born 6-4-1889, died 1963.  My mother came in 1930, died 1943, only 44 years old.

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

It was located where the pool is now. We had small classes, less than 60 in our graduating class. The girls were not allowed to wear jeans or slacks to classes until 1948, then only slacks on Friday. The football games were on a field behind the grade school (now Issaquah Middle School) and were afternoon games. Around 1947 they were at Memorial Field.

Our school dances, even Junior Prom and Senior Ball, were in the old green gym. We would decorate it and bring soft drinks.

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie Schomber lived on the same street that I did. She was a “Modern Woman,” worked outside the home, active in the community and her mother lived with her and her husband Jake. He was the janitor at the grade school.

Miss Crelly is the teacher I remember. Her first year at Issaquah was when I was a freshman. My children had her when they were in high school.

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No, but my kids were. They were on the 2nd floor of the junior high (the old high school). It was about 10:30 in the morning. When they got everyone out the kids came home early. For the next year they double shifted at the high school.

 

Local Businesses

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

In the years Wold Hardware was on the corner of Front and Sunset Way we shopped there. When that closed we bought everything there (Lewis). When my husband, Bill Arndt, was growing up, they got their hunting and fishing supplies there.

Our largest purchase at Wold hardware was a cookstove, and Andy Wold game my mother a pressure cooker for canning. I think it was $35.00 paid in 7 monthly payments.

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We bought groceries at the Red & White. First it was Miles Grocery, then John Kramer owned it. I’m sure we used credit for groceries since my father was unemployed often in the 30s. During the war Mrs. King, who worked there, would help me figure out the blue and red ration tokens. I was only 13 and had to do the grocery shopping. She would help me to pick things for dinner.

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Yes, we had a locker. That was when you bought a half a beef. This was in the 60s. By then there were a lot of stores in Issaquah. The Hi Lo, Thriftway.

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

As teenagers we went to the Barrel. The Shamrock was popular later. The Barrel was on Sunset Way next to Stonebridge Chevrolet, now Busch Auto Rebuild.

The Honeysuckle was also popular, but it wasn’t a hangout type.

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Not often. Dark chocolate caramels.

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

In my father’s younger days the bars were the social connection. No one had a phone. The men would meet to talk about work, looking for work, the garden, etc. Sometimes on weekends the women would go to see other people. Talking baseball was always number 1.

Later in the 50s we would go to the Union once in a while. Cocktail bars – Nick’s, later Fasano’s – was the first. They had to be in a restaurant and women couldn’t sit at the bar.

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Didn’t use it.

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Going in as a teenager admiring the make up and gift selections. I remember Mr. Lawill walked home for lunch and back to the store.

He was very helpful. When the kids were sick he would suggest things to do for them.

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Don’t remember any political ruckus. The mayor and council were businessmen in Issaquah. They would try to work things out quickly and help where they could.

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

No.

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Yes, we thought it was exciting. Some of the old-time families that didn’t get their name used felt slighted.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

My father worked in the coal mines, which meant he didn’t work very much. In the summer some of the men found wood they could cut, and tried to get enough to last the winter. We got 1 ton of coal and the wood would keep the stove going for hot water, heat and cooking.

We ate what we could grow in the garden. My mother would can everything she could pick or grow. She would take clothes apart to make school clothes for me. I got new shoes for school, when the sole got a hole it was covered with cardboard. Coats were second hand.

Our landlady couldn’t read or write English so my mother helped her with paper work. If we didn’t have the rent money she would let it go for the month.

We didn’t have a car so I remember we did a lot of walking. Going to Seattle on the bus was a big occasion, got all dressed up.

Issaquah had wooden sidewalks, quite high off the road. They were uneven, it was easy to trip and fall.

You knew everyone you saw downtown. The women had a break from very hard labor when they had a chance to visit.

I remember we had a lot of soup. The butcher would give a soup bone with lots of meat left on.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

I knew many that went to war. Down by the Press office there was a huge fixture built with every person’s name that went in the service. If they were killed, a gold star would be put in front of the name. Since we were a small town we knew almost every one of them. On my small block five boys went into the service. That is out of 11 houses. Many out-of-state people moved in, schools were bulging. For the first time people, men and women, had steady jobs. We dumped aluminum in an empty lot downtown (for bombs), took grease to the butcher shop to make explosives. I don’t know if it was used, but we felt like we were winning the war.

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Yes, several Japanese students had to leave. In one case, before they had to leave, one boy in the school band was going with the school band to play in Seattle at the toll plaza on the floating bridge. An inspector came on the bus. When he saw a Japanese student, they were not allowed to cross the bridge, and had to go around through Renton.

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

War effort work, Boeing worked three sifts, ship yards also. The coal mines and logging and mill work were in demand.

I was too young. Did lots of babysitting because people had money to go out.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Labor Day was wilder. More small town celebration. Memorial Field had a carnival, dances at the Fire Hall. The bars would overflow and patrons would bring their drinks outside.

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

Before my time. My dad said they were great, lots of fun. Lots of baseball games with other small towns, Black Diamond, Fall City, etc.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Skating. Swimming. One year my friend and her family rented a cabin for a week. One-room wood shack with small wood stove to cook on. We swam all day and went skating at night. If we needed groceries we would walk to the Little Store. Half of the Little Store was a bar. Going skating on Friday was a must.

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Yes, mostly Alexander’s Resort. If we couldn’t get a ride, we would walk down the railroad tracks. The kids would go by themselves and an adult would pick us up later – dinnertime. All the organized picnics were there. They had cook stoves under cover to warm up food and also the kids when they got out of the cold water.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

It employed a lot of men, cleared the land for homes and roads, made lumber affordable. My husband started in the woods at 15. All handsaws, this was before the War. Falling, then cutting up the trees and getting them ready for the mills. Both two-man saws and one-man. After the war he worked on Snoqualmie Pass area, clearing for the highway addition. The first power saw he used was in 1949. It was huge, weighed about 75 pounds. These were only used for falling the trees. They were still cutting up by hand saws.

They were transported by truck to the mill. The largest he can recall was 17 ft. in diameter on the butt, and around here many firs were 5 ft. in diameter. These are all old growth.

Some of the steep areas would send the logs down a chute to the loading area.

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

Yes, the Monohon Mill, Red Hall’s Preston, not the High Point or Issaquah Lumber Co.

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I don’t; my husband does.

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

It brought in a lot of tourists. At one time there was a sign that said Largest Salmon Hatchery in the World.

In the summer we would walk to the park behind the hatchery and have picnics. It was shady and the ponds had water wheels. There was a wading pond next to Gibson Hall.

When it was officially opened the Governor spoke and they had a queen contest.

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

No.

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Yes – but no connection with the working end.

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No. But I knew many that did.

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

We took the bus to Seattle, around through Renton, by way of the Issaquah-Renton Road. That was Highway 10 then. We would look at store windows, get a new pair of shoes for school. It was a special day; got all dressed up and feel like we were in the Greatest City.

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

The cars didn’t go through downtown and we missed watching the latest car models.

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My family didn’t have a car. After I was married our first car was a ’55 Chev.

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

When I was in my first few years of grade school my neighbor took me to Veterans of Foreign Wars Christmas Party. Most of the children said a piece or poem, or sang a song. [We] played games; many groups of local people sang Christmas songs and Santa came and handed out a gift. Every child brought one and got one.

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I was quite small when it was built but during the years there were a lot of people shooting to win a turkey. There were a lot of private parties held there. Lots of fun.

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I remember when it had some skating and once the Harlem Globetrotters played there. Later (?) dances. Lots of dances. During the War people would take turns watching for enemy aircraft.

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

That is where the Veterans’ parties were held. Some private parties.

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

My father worked in every coal mine in Issaquah. He started as a teenager and retired around 1950. In the early days they used mules to pull the cars. He worked at the Grand Ridge Mine, the mine on Mine Hill when it was owned by the Germans. Later Harris and Bianco (?) mines.

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

Very bad. Sometimes the tunnels were small and they could [not] fully stand erect. He was in more than one cave-in. One time he was buried to his chest. As a young man he had a compound fracture of his leg. The bone never healed straight.

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

They cost 10¢, then they went to 11¢ so we didn’t have a penny for candy at the Honeysuckle. I went every Friday when my dad had a job. Even then I’m sure it wasn’t easy to give me 10¢. Often I would take back neighbors’ beer bottles for some money.

The movie was a great meeting place. Many trips back to the bathroom to meet kids. Both Male and Female toilets were out of the same waiting area, 1 water fountain.

Front Street

My dad went to this bar [the Klondike Bar]. Issaquah had lots of taverns. Even kids could go in. (This entry refers to the photo on the page and probably belongs under the question about bars.)

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Issaquah Community Church. I started about 3. It was the old church then, it burned, rebuilt by the creek on Rainier Blvd. Later built on Mt. Park [Blvd]. The kids only went to Sunday School for the hour of church. We didn’t go to adult church until about 10.

Additional Memories

When I was very young, about 3, I was at my grandparents’, it faced Sunset Way. This was the main road to Seattle or North Bend through Snoqualmie. A group of gypsies, 20 or more were walking through town toward Snoqualmie Valley. The women in their long dresses, scarves. My aunt and I got on our knees to look out the window so they wouldn’t see us. My grandparents were from Europe and they told my aunt the gypsies used to steal the children.

When my dad was a young boy he lived there. He said if you were out after dark it was pitch black – no streetlights of any kind. This was probably before 1900. He said he was running home and fell over something on the path, and sidewalks. It was a cow. This was 2 blocks from downtown Issaquah.

His neighbor was an old doctor that had worked for the train companies during the cross county rails being laid. He would pull teeth when he was practicing in Issaquah or anything that needed done. His practice was in his house.

When my dad was a young boy around 1900 and before he lived on what is Sunset Way, there were a lot of Indians living in the area still and when my grandfather was working in a coal mine away from Issaquah the Indians would come around and look in the windows. Some were drunk and making lots of noise. My grandmother was alone with several small children. The kids would hide. They never broke into the house though.

Back to the Memory Books

Marilyn Dodge Batura

Name:Marilyn (Dodge) Batura

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

My family moved to the Issaquah Valley in the 1930’s and I am a lifetime resident.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

It is still, with all the recent growth, a wonderful town. We have a close family who have remained in the area and still enjoy the beauty of the village nestled between the mountains.

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Clark Elementary, Issaquah Jr. High and Issaquah High School

Family History in Issaquah:

My parents moved to the valley in the mid 1930’s and raised five children on our farm just south of town.  We all attended the local schools and I cannot imagine a better childhood.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

My class (1962) was the last class to graduate from the high school referenced in our fight song “on the hilltop” which is now the site of the Julius Boehm swimming pool.  I have fond memories of school and the teachers.  Everyone knew everyone – the whole school district, Preston, May Valley, Pine Lake attended the same schools.  Our principal was Charles Fallstrom, who coincidently was my half-brother George Larsen’s school teacher in the early 40’s at Issaquah High.  George left school and joined the Army and died shortly before the war ended in 1945.

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I remember Minnie as a speaker at our homecoming assemblies and also as a classmate of my step-father Schaller Bennett (class of 1919).

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

No, but my sister Nancy was in the school cafeteria during the 1949 earthquake and said it was quite frightening.  She told about the damage and cracked pavement.

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played the flute in the band under the direction of Bill Klein, which gave me the opportunity to go to all the sporting events with a guaranteed good seat.  We also participated in the parades such as Seafair and Torchlight in Seattle.  I later marched in the Drill Team at the school games.

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Growing up in the 50’s, there wasn’t much for teens to do in Issaquah.  For a short time there was a teen center in the old Fireman’s Hall at the Memorial Field.  They had a pool table and some games but it wasn’t long before the building was torn down.  On Friday nights we would go to the Issaquah Theatre – never to watch the movie but to gather, talk and socialize.  The ushers and other patrons did not appreciate us very much and sometimes asked that we leave before the end of the movie.  We went roller-skating at Vasa Park and to the Factoria Drive-In Theatre when we had a car.  Occasionally we went to the Spanish Castle on Hwy 99 to dance and see the popular Rock and Roll or County-Western artists of that time.

If we got in trouble our punishment was usually grounding and extra chores.

Local Businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Saturday we went with Dad to the Western WA Co-Op (site of Darigold now) where they sold hay, grain and farm supplies.  We had a great time riding on the hand dolly, playing hide and seek in the maze of stacked sacks of grain and hay and probably being a real nuisance to the employees.  I think Walt Karvia and Floyd Bush were both working there at that time.

I also remember Brady’s when it was located on E. Sunset across the street from the Log Tavern.  The store was long and narrow with oiled wood floors and bolts and bolts of yard goods.  Mom would send us down with a scrap of material (probably flour sack cloth for a dress) and Mrs. Brady would patiently help us pick out the tread and buttons to match the sewing project.  Every purchase was neatly folded in brown paper and tied with a string that magically came down from a spool hung over the yard goods table.

I recall riding my bike to the Red & White grocery (which was next to Brady’s) to buy vinegar for pickles my Mom was making.  As I was getting back on my bike, the bottle dropped to the sidewalk and shattered.  I was devastated because I didn’t have another quarter to replace the purchase, but the store clerk had witnessed the accident and promptly replaced the vinegar at no charge.

Mr. Cussac had a shoe store about where Fischer’s Meats is located today.  It was another long, narrow store with the oiled floors.  He was an elderly gentleman who shook terribly, probably with Parkinson’s disease.  The shoeboxes were neatly stored on shelves, floor to ceiling.  He would slowly climb a ladder to retrieve the shoes you wanted to try and then painstakingly lace each eye for the trial fit.  Due to his shaking, this was a tedious task for him and you were inclined to take the first pair even if they weren’t to your liking.

Another delight was the Dime Store (where Las Margarita’s is today).  It was a variety store with lots of trinkets and where we did all our Christmas shopping as children.  Mrs. Yourglich and Mrs. Trigg were the store clerks and the store was owned by the Dalbottens.

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

We usually did not frequent the beauty or barbershop as my Dad had barbered so we all learned the craft at a very young age.  He taught us by having us cut his hair then each other’s.  There were some strange dos in our household and one was so bad I remember my brother wearing a Mohawk for a while.  Later Bill Evans opened Evan’s Salon of Beauty on Sunset where the Brewhouse is now located.  At one time I thought I might like a career in cosmetology so I interviewed Mr. Evans for my Career Notebook, which was a required high school project.

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Lewis Hardware was another interesting store, with lots of gadgets, which is much the same today as it was fifty years ago.

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Our groceries were mostly purchased at the Grange Mercantile but I remember Tony Wallen very well.  He was always jovial and especially on Labor Day when he would pair up with Schaller Bennett and visit the local bars.  Sometimes they would come by our house and try to coerce me to sing for them as they remembered an Eagles talent show in which Susan Vidonis (Ruby) and I sang a duet “I don’t want to play in your yard.”

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We did most of our shopping at the Grange Mercantile where we also went to retrieve meat from our rented locker.  It was so very cold that you literally ran to your locker, unlocked a padlock and got the meat as fast as you could.  Our grocery list was primarily flour, sugar and the basics since we raised our beef; had a cow for milk, butter, and cottage cheese and had a garden with fruits and vegetables.  John Kramer owned the store and his brother Dan was the butcher.  There were wood shavings on the floor in the butcher shop and Joan Karvia and Imogene Woodside were clerks at the time.

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

The Shamrock (Shane’s or Rena’s ) was the teen hangout.  The Honeysuckle, with grouchy, Mr. Drylie was the place to get green rivers, sundaes and ice cream floats.

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Boehm’s candy was way over our budget, but Julius did visit our grade schools and bring samples.  He would tell the class about his escape from Hitler’s regime by skiing over the Alps!  He was very interesting and quite an athlete. He later taught me to swim as a Red Cross instructor at the Lake Sammamish State Park.  He also scaled Mt. Rainier several times.

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

The Rolling Log (with the running water spittoon), Union Tavern, Eagles Club and Fasano’s cocktail lounge (which was then next door to the Log Tavern) were all busy bars with interesting clientele.

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

The Grange Supply was a fuel and farm supply store, and we purchased garden and hay seed at the store.  Also, it was the ONLY reliable source of gasoline for grange members during the gas shortages in the early 70’s.

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

The drug store on the corner of Front and Alder was the place to go if you needed a prescription, bandages or medications.

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

Although I am too young to recall this era, I remember stories and it was then that my family moved to Issaquah.  Dad had been involved in real estate sales in the Everett area and moved to Issaquah when the Depression hit.  He purchased 72 acres on the Issaquah Creek at the Y of the Hobart/May Valley road and started a herd of milk goats.  He, with the help of a hired man, milked 100 goats twice a day and shipped the milk to the Alpine Dairy (now Darigold).  I think he was paid $ .10 a pound for the milk.  My sister Nancy and stepbrother George (Buddy) had to herd the goats up the mountain every morning after milking and then retrieve them for the evening milking.  They had a garden and raised most of our food.  There were salmon in the creek and occasionally Dad shot a bear for meat if it was threatening the herd of goats.  The bear did not eat the goat meat, but would kill the goat for the milk bag.

Dad also worked for wages on the local WPA projects such as the Fish Hatchery and Gibson Hall.

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Many young high school students signed up for the war and my stepbrother (George Larsen) was one who died in that effort.  His name is one of those listed on the memorial, which is located by the current Library building.   Communication was so poor in those days that we were not notified of his death and became worried when an Aunt saw his name included on a list of “missing in action” in a Seattle newspaper.  Most of Mom’s letters to him were returned after his death unopened.  My Mom always walked with the VFW in the Labor Day parade in his memory.

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Labor Days were pretty wild celebrations.  I don’t remember the rodeos but in later years there was a parade and the Seattle Seafair Pirates came to town.  There was a big carnival with a game arcade and rides.  We would furiously pick blackberries to sell so that we had spending money for the carnival.  Mr. Phillips, who had a gas station where the new library parking building is being built (across W Sunset from the Fish Hatchery) would carefully weigh them and pay us about ten cents a pound for the berries.  No cheating by including some stones for weight, because he poured them from your container to a flat and demanded “clean” berries.  I usually made enough money to buy some sweets, ride the Ferris wheel and come home with a bellyache.

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

My stepfather Schaller Bennett (Bennett Logging Company and IHS graduate 1919) participated in the rodeos.  He cherished a saddle with silver trim that had been awarded to him as the grand prize in an Issaquah Labor Day Rodeo.

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

The Christmas programs at church were always special and Bill Bergsma was the best Santa Claus ever!  He had a beautiful costume and really looked the part when he gave everyone a candy cane.

I also remember a New Year’s Eve in the early 50’s when my family went visiting friends by Pine Lake.  We were driving home in the early evening and the car broke down on East Lake Sammamish by the boat launch site.  We walked to Hans Jensen’s to see if he could give us a ride home.  Mr. Jensen was a bachelor and very happy to have company for the evening!  He insisted we stay to see in the New Year and then he would drive us home.  He served some snacks and even sang some Danish folk songs.  It was a very late night for our family but a New Years Eve I’ll never forget.  When he passed away he willed his lakefront acreage to the State for youth activities and parks.

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

We always had horses so rode the trails on tiger mountain instead of hiking.  We could even ride down the Hobart Road without automobile interference since the traffic was so light in those days.

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

I only remember roller-skating at Vasa Park as we usually swam at the Lake Sammamish State Park.

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We took swimming lessons and had picnics at the State Park.  I did go ice-skating once with Tom and Sue Bush at the Horrock’s pond.  Mrs. Horrock’s was a lovely hostess and found some skates that would fit me.

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

I’m too young to remember the mills, but my home is located on the former site of the Issaquah Lumber Company on Front Street South.  When my family lived on the Goat Ranch about four miles south of town, my Mom would ride Smokey the Burro to town, as she did not drive.  Smokey would balk at the noise and not pass the mill so she would tie him to a tree where Sycamore is today and walk the rest of the way to town.  After the mill burned, he would pass so she would ride to Dr. Hillary’s office (now Dr. Fasano’s) and tether him there.

When Dad bought the mill property on Front Street he had house-movers transport our home to its current location.  We all rode inside the house and Mom played records on a wind-up record player to pass the time and keep us entertained.

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

We had a small farm at home with a dairy cow, chickens, an occasional pig and a few horses.  We also raised beef cattle and hay on forty acres we had about five miles south of town.  We had a large vegetable garden, which was preserved and utilized through the winter.

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

After the Pickering Farm would mechanically hay their fields with balers, they would let us pick up the “loose hay” left in the field.  Dad and my brother would toss the hay into the truck with pitchforks but it was our task to stomp it down to accommodate a bigger load.  It was a hot, sticky, scratchy job and then when we finally got home we had to unload it!  Not one of my favorite memories.

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

In the late 30’s and early 40’s, my family shipped goat’s milk when it was Hans Forster’s Alpine Dairy.  The milk was mostly used for cheese.  Ironically, my husband Rich recently retired after 32 years with Darigold.

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

When we went to Seattle it was usually by bus.  In the early 50’s for a special treat Mom took us on a field trip.  We went by bus to Boeing Field; from there we flew to Port Angeles on a propjet, and then took a Greyhound bus home, which included a ferry ride.  Quite an exciting day for some youngsters from Issaquah!

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was a ’55 Chev purchased from a neighbor boy who was going into the Navy.  I think I paid him $350.  P.S.  I think the Kaiser-Frazier dealer was Pabst-Vidonis.

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Since there wasn’t much in the way of entertainment, our social life evolved around the church.  We regularly attended the Baptist Church but would go with our neighbors to the Seventh Day Adventist Church on Saturday and maybe the a weekday service with another friend at her church.

In the summer, Martin Hansen had Vacation Bible School at his church up in High Point.  He would drive around town picking up all the kids in an old school bus with a most unusual horn.  He would pull up in front of the house and sound the horn, OOOOGA- OOOOGA.  We all called it the oooga-oooga bus.

My Dad would take us to church and return after the service to pick us up.  Our older sister was the Sunday school superintendent so we had to behave.  One nice summer day after she had married and moved to another town, my younger sister and I told Dad that we would walk home.  Then, instead of going to Sunday school, we walked down the sidewalk beside the church and went directly to the Honeysuckle Soda Fountain.  There we deposited our “collection plate” money for a pineapple sundae!  We then took our time walking home and Mom couldn’t understand why we weren’t very hungry for her big Sunday dinner.  I think the lack of hunger was partly due to ice cream and a lot due to guilt!

 

Additional Memories

We had some interesting visitors in the early 1950’s such as the McNess Lady.  She was an elderly lady and drove a shiny maroon Buick.  She always wore a long wool coat with a fur collar that looked like a weasel.  We were in awe of her and she sometimes gave us samples of her wares.  There were quite a few traveling sales people and they all had wonderful sales pitches, but never made a sale with my Mom.

The Njos’ had an ice house in what is now the Arbor Building on W Sunset and delivered ice for our ice box.  The driver would often break off some chips for us on hot summer days.

 

AUTHOR of THIS MEMORY BOOK (signature and date)

Marilyn Batura

Clint Brady

Name: Clint Brady

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

From 1960-2000, I moved my family out last year when our old neighborhood began to sport multiple new homes on the land that used to be vegetable gardens.

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

Born there and would have stayed under different circumstances.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

It was a small town with a big heart.

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Clark Elementary 1965-1971

Issaquah Junior High 1971-1975

Issaquah High School 1975-1978

Western Washington University BA 1980-1983

MA 1987-1989

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Grandparents moved there in the early 1920s

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I graduated in 1978.  I remember “double shifting” in my freshman year because the school was too full and no other schools had been built at the time.  Joe Peterson, Civics Teacher, was the most influential on me as I ended up an American Government teacher.  I also recall a Mr. Wiles, who taught Biology.  The man smoked like a chimney and always wore a white lab coat.  He looked like he had just stepped out of a “B” movie from the 1950s.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I remember the 1965 quake, but the only school memory I have from this event was that in the early 70s, our PE teachers at Issaquah Junior High used to tell us that the “Old Gym” was unsafe because of quake damage.  We played in it anyway!

 

Education—Coming of Age

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Many of us were volunteer fire-fighters.  We carried small pagers that could be made to monitor all the fire calls in King County.  Whenever any department had a call, we’d tell our teachers we had to leave to go fight the fire.  Most of us avoided a great deal of class time by doing this.  Our teachers always let us go, but they had to wonder why the Woodinville fire service would need a bunch of Issaquah firemen to help them out.  It was fun and many of my friends ended up full-time firemen in their later lives.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Of course my Dad’s clothing store “Brady’s” sticks out in my mind, but my favorite store was the Rexall Drug store two doors down from Dad’s on Front Street.  I bought comic books there (many of which I still have).  I think a man by the name of Seeh or Sechs owned the business.  It was a neat store with lots of stuff for a young boy to take interest in, especially the comic books.

I bought a comic there, Amazing Spider Man #25, that figured prominently in a short story I had published a few years back.  I still have the comic, and I think about that old store every time I pull the book out.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

My grandparents were close friends of Rita and Tom.  My first fishing trip was to Lake Eastern with Tom and my grandpa.  I used a pale purchased at Lewis Hardware.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We shopped at Johnny’s Food Center for years.  I still remember Johnny ringing up our purchases while smoking a cigar!  He was quite a man; even after all those years, I don’t see a music store- I see a small town food market- every time I go past the old building.

I think my dad used to deliver groceries for Johnny when he was young.

The bottom part of the Grange Mercantile building was a grocery store too.  We used to buy some products there as well.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We bought sundry items there (comic books for me of course) and yes, we had a food storage locker there! My grandfather hunted and we stored deer and cows, rendered, and stored the frozen meat there (hard to believe now)!

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Rena’s was on Front Street, down from Fasano’s, if I remember correctly, we knew the owner of XXX (Pickering, I think) so our family used to eat there when it first opened.  I remembered an awesome clam chowder recipe being served there.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

We did go to Boehm’s. We lived across the creek behind the complex.  We loved to go there on Halloween as they used to give out free candy in little bags.  This stuff easily beat the confections available from our neighbors!  The best trick or treating was always at Boehm’s.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

When I was older my friends and I used to go to the rolling log occasionally to play pool.  The local fire-men had an “in” with the Doherty family bar.  Roy Doherty was a volunteer fireman.  When the station needed beer, they’d get “pump cans from Auntie Maggie”.  This was one of several frequently transmitted broadcasts that had a double meaning for those in the know.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Most of us knew when the local airport was shut down that the writing was on the wall for small town Issaquah.  Of all the ebb and flow of local politics, that event sticks out the most in my mind.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

This was before my time, but my Grandma used to tell me stories about our store using the barter system.  Grandma and grandpa traded clothes for lumber to build their house!

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Again this was before my time, Grandma told about Brady’s getting in trouble with the government over the sale of nylons during the war.  My dad left Issaquah and joined the Coast Guard.  He was stationed in Alaska during the war.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

There was a field behind 1st Ave NE that used to be available for the rodeo (its now apartments).  I found the radiator cap from a mercury automobile * out there and Mr. Yesley used to dig up old silver dollars in the field when he planted his vegetable garden.

This was a Mercury Statue, really neat!  I think I still have the cap somewhere.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

One year my friend Bob Butterfield and I dressed up like mummies for the Labor Day Parade.  We were wrapped from head to toe in ace bandages, quite a site!

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Labor Day use to bring full carnival to memorial field.  One time, a haunted house was set up as part of the Carnival.  This was the late 60s, a time of revival in interest for the classic monster movies of the 30s, 40s, and 50s.  All my friends were monster fanatics (or fair addicts for the older D.C. Comics readers) and we be-friended the owner of the attraction.  He actually “hired” us to work for him and offered to let us stay overnight in this house.  Unfortunately not one of our parents would let us stay!

I personally have never cared for Salmon Days.  The event just doesn’t have a community feel like Labor Day did in my youth.

 

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Some lesser known events include Ku Klux Klan meetings held in town in the late 1920s, a thriving boot legging industry (located near present day Issaquah Highlands) in the 1930s and “Black Out” patrols in the 1940s during WWII.  All these events took place before I came along, but the other members of the community use to talk about them when I was a kid.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

As kids we used to love to play under and on the old train trestle.  It was quite a thrill (perhaps a passage to manhood) to walk across the rickety structure without chickening out, or getting run over by a train for that matter!  Once across, the area along the hillside seemed very isolated and woodsy; like really leaving civilization behind for the excitement of the woods.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Used to fish with a pole, now I don scuba gear using a spear gun and goody bag to fish.  This is an expensive way to fish and there isn’t much of this type of fishing available in Issaquah Creek.  However, Issaquah Creek provided a fine training ground for my early fishing adventures.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Our family went to a friend’s house on Lake Sammamish (the Hefts), or to Alexander’s Beach to swim.  I learned to swim at Alexander’s.  When the park closed, my folks talked about buying some property there, but thought it was a bad investment!

In the 1980s I was scuba diving in front of Flintoff’s beach property.  I found an old safe on the bottom of the lake.  Empty and missing its door, I often wonder what the story behind that old safe might be…

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

As a student interested in history, I used to talk with Nels Pearson about logging on Grand Ridge, where my family owns property.  He showed me the remnants of the old camps and the various roads that led into the logging sites.  At that time, the old cabins were still standing.  Another family actually pulled a brass bed out of one of these cabins.  You would never even know they had been there today.  Its all grown over and torn down.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

The High Point Mill, a little equipment is still there.  In the 60s we got the boards to build our property barn and fences from this mill.  They were rough cut fir.  Even though they are almost 40 years old now, many have not rotted.  I used several of these old 2 X 4s to repair my parents fence just recently.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

The hatchery has been a landmark in town since I was young.  I remember going to the hatchery and marveling at all the hatchlings.  Later, we used to ride our bikes in the unused concrete holding pens. Still later, I recall taking one of my first girlfriends there and kissing on the bridge!

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

Our family, like most the families we knew, grew a vegetable garden.  Usually the garden was on the extra lot next to the residence home.  Most of those old lots have had new homes built on them in recent years.  My folks still have a lot next to their house, but it has been planted over with grass since Austin Wiggins died; one of the last “lot farmers” in town.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

My wife Bonnie works for West Farm Foods now (the former Darigold).  She started as an office secretary in the Issaquah plant and is now a company accountant and systems trainer.  She is currently working out of the corporate office in Seattle.

 

Railroad—Transportation

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

When I-90 was constructed, an old hotel that had been on Highway 10 needed to be removed.  The hotel was used as a training fire for IVFD.  I watched the firefighters working that day and that’s what motivated me to join District 10, and the Issaquah Fire as a teenager.

Also there used to be an old gas station/ store/ hotel half way between Issaquah and High Point, near the westbound lanes.  Apparently, the business had once served as a “house of ill repute” for the loggers and miners of the area.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

My first car was a 1954 Ford, given to me by my grandparents in 1976.  They had purchased the Ford from Hepler’s.  My grandparents drove a car from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean in the early 1920s.  At the time it was quite an event.  The car and my grandparents were written up in a full page article in the Centralia newspaper, where they were living at the time.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

I remember spaghetti dinners there to support the IVFD.  Our next door neighbor, Bob Beach, was one of the chiefs at that time.  Our family would always turn out at these events to show our support for Bob and the IVFD.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Every year there was a Veteran’s Christmas Party upstairs.  I used to really enjoy those events which included telling Santa Claus (Bill Bergsma) what we wanted for x-mas.  One Christmas I was sick (with the measles, I think) and missed the party.  I was sure Santa wouldn’t visit me on Christmas because I hadn’t been at the Grange party to tell him what I wanted that year.  Somehow, Santa still managed to come through for me.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Ah, the old Issaquah Theater. I really liked that decrepit place; especially all the movie posters lining the stairway between the first and second floor. When I was very young, maybe five, I used to walk in-between my dad’s store (Brady’s) and the theater; a tight space, to say the least.

One of the first movie I remember seeing at the theater was “The Vulture,” a 1960’s grade 2 monster movie. I begged, cried and worked my hardest to talk my dad into taking me to the film. He finally gave in and we went. I remember the climax involved grafting a human head to a vulture body; a scene I remember to this day. As time when on, we used to go to James Bond films and try to meet girls, never with much success (oh well).

Films I distinctly remember seeing: The Vulture, Born Free & Living Free, the Cat, Thunderball and 2001: A Space Odyssey. Seeing 2001 was mind-boggling for a third grader. The psychedelic death/rebirth scene was almost nauseating to my young mind. Years later, while a college student, I became intrigued with the amazing concepts behind Arthur Clark’s short story and the way Stanley Kubrick interpreted the work. Perhaps that first experience, sitting in the Issaquah theater, was what drew me to science fiction in my adult years.

 

Front Street

Front Street has always defined Issaquah. I’ve seen businesses (including my family’s) come and go, but the street still looks much like it did when my grandparents first arrived in the 1920’s.  Big changes included the renovation of the area which houses Front Street Market; tearing down the old Ford agency and the small shops and bars to make room for the Market and the Texaco (formerly the Gull) station.  The new library parking lot still looks pretty alien to me, every time I pass Front and Sunset I still see the H&H Tavern in my mind’s eye. Small familiarities include Lewis Hardware, the old green bank (now a bike shop) and the seemingly perpetual furniture that was Thomas’s for most of my youth.  Of course I still see my family’s Brady’s Department store where Domino’s is located today.  I swear, driving by late at night, I can see Grandma and Grandpa Brady’s ghosts still organizing the clothing in the two display windows.

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

My family belonged to the Issaquah Baptist Church, originally located behind Darigold on Rainer Ave.  That building used to scare me when I was a kid, even though it housed a church! It always seemed dark and mysterious inside the place. Our family moved with the Church to the modern building across from the Catholic Church.  The new building seemed much more open and friendly. I was baptized in this church.

 

Additional Memories

Growing up in Issaquah holds a lot of great memories for me.  From being twelve and my friends and me riding our bikes down Front Street carrying .22 rifles (having no one raise an eyebrow) to growing a vegetable garden in the vacant lot next door right up until last year when we moved our family out of town.  Issaquah was a quiet, caring little bedroom community with great people and great places to visit.  I still feel like I’m coming home every time I crest the valley on I-90 and see Tiger Mountain, Grand Ridge and Lake Sammamish State Park.  I sweep away the asphalt, buildings and cars and let my mind wander back to the airport, cow fields and farms.  The real Issaquah is still there, its just a little harder to see.

Back to the Memory Books

John T. Brady

Name: John T. Brady

Birth Date or Year (optional): 06/10/25

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

72 years.

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

Didn’t have a choice, my parents moved here.

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Was a quiet comfortable town in the past!

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Issaquah Elementary and Issaquah High School.

Family History in Issaquah:

Father was a merchant here, Brady’s Dry Goods.

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

1939 – 1943 the main concern was what part I would play in the coming war.  One of the most pleasurable parts of my high school years was the school band in which I participated as a trumpet player.  Mr. Blaine Ellefson and William Seaman, both were in music, Mr. Seaman was primarily an English teacher and was an excellent piano teacher.  Both were most influential in my life.

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

Minnie Schomber was known by most of the fellows as she was head of the draft board in Issaquah, (she was the draft board).

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

Not in school at that time.

 

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

Since I was in the school band I had to play at football games to cheer our team.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Played some kids baseball, Issaquah Theatre was a big form of entertainment as well as roller-skating at Vasa Park.  As punishment for misdeeds I couldn’t go to the movies.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

My father was in business so I remember most all the businesses.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Just a regular standard haircut at Dave Lewis barbershop.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Tom Lewis was very knowledgeable about hunting and fishing.  He was very helpful with projects I was working on.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Bought most groceries at Miles Red & White store as I worked there after school.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

Purchased some groceries and meats at the Grange – managed by Ellsworth Pickering.  Our family did have a storage locker there to preserve meat products.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

Mike and Rena Shane’s café was known for the wonderful pies Rena made.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Seeds and hay.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Only drug store in Issaquah.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Mayor Stella Alexander was the only lady mayor and was very controversial.  Judge Baker a city judge also had a restaurant.

 

Do you recall Ordinance No. 752 that changed most of the street names in town?  What were your feelings about this change at the time?

Liked the name changes.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

As far as I was concerned, nobody else had anything so we were all on equal terms.  Some people had a garden, chickens and hogs which helped with the food supply.  One main entertainment which was not expensive was the radio.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

My best friend, Kenny Kobukata was sent to an internment camp.  I was very unhappy when this happened.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Defense work – Boeing, Shipyards, and Renton Paccar Co.  (Kenworth Motor Co.)

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I did enjoy the round up or Rodeo but did not enjoy other celebrations because of all the people they brought in.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

I enjoyed bronco riding, cattle roping, and horse racing, bull dogging.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Really enjoyed fishing hunting and hiking in the area as it was a perfect setting to do those things.  Most boys did these things as the only other thing to do was work.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

Trout – biggest I caught was 16 inches.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Did swim in the lakes, but did not ice skate.  Swam mostly in Lake Sammamish at Alexander’s Beach.  I could ride my bike there.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

Trying to learn how to milk a cow – Bruce Pickering worked with me.

 

Railroad—Transportation

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

Model A Ford, 4 door model 1931 deluxe – cost $300.00 in 1941.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I remember it being built by WPA workers.  Target shot there.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Attend dinners upstairs in the Grange Hall – Also attended U7W meetings there as well as wedding receptions.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Used to see – Sat. afternoon cowboy movies with my Grandpa.

 

Back to the Memory Books

Delores Kinnune Busby

Delores Kinnune Busby

Delores Kinnune Busby

Delores Kinnune Busby

Name: Dolores Busby

Birth Date or Year (optional):

7/30/1929

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

I’ve lived here all my life graduated from Issaquah High as my dad and brother did before me- also an aunt on my mother’s side

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Guess Issaquah is part of my heritage

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

We had open campus at noon a lot of kids went downtown for lunch.  I would rush down to be cashier at the restaurant my mother worked at, for doing that I received a free hamburger which I ate on the way back to school.

To me school was something we took pride in.  It was sad to see it torn down- there’s still reminders such as the steps in the front, which now is the swimming pool.

Remember Mrs. Allen- Home Ec (?)

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I didn’t have Minnie for first grade.  I had Mrs. McMasters.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Friday night was show night.  We’d walk to Drylie’s Sunday afternoon for a coke or spent time at the “barrel” XXX.

When I was in trouble at home I was grounded.  At school we stood out in the hall, that was for talking in class.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Brady’s dry goods on south side of Sunset.   Bought blouses, material.  Mrs. Brady was always glad to see you.  I did my shopping at the Grange.  Besides shopping you socialized- in those days you knew everyone.

My dad and his dad before him had a shoe repair shop- When I was little we lived at the shops.  One the living quarters were upstairs, the second one living quarters were attached to shop both on Front St.  Last one became a restaurant.  Think the Hartleys had it.  In 1951 my mother and dad had the restaurant.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Once in a while my hair was permed.  Went to Inga Johnson’s shop in her home, corner of Sunset and Second.  If you happened to be there at lunch time- she fixed a big dinner and you ate with she and her husband.  First time I had fish gravy, which was really good.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

Tom Lewis and my dad, Henry Kinnune were great friends.  When I married, our first TV came from Tom’s.  Every thing my husband needed in the line of plumbing shells for his gun, small appliances came from Lewis.  If not there at Wold’s Hardware.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

We had a frozen food locker at the Grange beside buy our groceries.  Remember Imogene Woodside and Joan Karvia.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I worked at XXX in the late 49 and 50.  May Harris was the cook, she was a fun person to be around.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

My first memory was Steaveson’s drug store, which in later years became Rena’s- Lawill’s was on the corner.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

Being from a small town you knew all the boys who went to serve.  One of my dear friends lost his life.  He was an only child, was very hard on his parents.

We had a tower above the VFD hall where the library now sits- had shifts to watch and report planes.  A lot of us put in our shift.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Family took part in Labor Day Parade.  My husband marched with V.F.W. have 8 mm of some of parade-  The children entered the children’s parade.  After we had a big picnic with all our friends.  A fun day for everyone.

 

Was there any year that these celebrations were especially memorable to you?

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Enjoy pioneer days- Early day friends attend, so nice to see them.

 

Outdoor Recreation

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Vasa Park went skating had a girlfriend her dad was manager of the park on weekends.  I stayed with her and helped out her folks.

In grade school we went to the Issaquah Park where the fish hatchery is now.  I remember having a birthday party there.  I jumped out of a tree and had to have a clamp on my wrist.  Dr. Hillery’s office was above the band building.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

As a young girls, we swam in Issaquah Creek on the folks land.  It was deep enough in one spot you could dive.

After I was married my children took swimming lessons at Pine Lake “Frenches”.  We’d go to Alexander’s for the day and husband would come afterward for dinner.  Had big picnic at Parr’s Park in the 50 and Timberlake.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

My grandma Heric cooked at the boarding house in Monohon.  My mother and brother lived there.

 

Farming and Dairy

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

Didn’t work at the creamery but took many trips there with a pack to buy cheese.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Went by bus- special occasion and did shopping

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

Went to turkey shoots before Thanksgiving and Christmas- took chances on winning a turkey

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

Went to dinners as a young girl we went as a family, enjoyed dining with my dad.  Later years the V.F.W. held dances there and my husband was part of that.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

The V.F.W. met at the Grange meeting hall. Many dinners. Christmas parties for the kids. My children still remember going there at Christmas and Santa giving out gifts.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

As a little girl I went to movies with my mother. 10 ¢.  When I was older my brothers and I went.  Didn’t sit together but always walked home together.

When I stayed with my aunt south of town we walked to movies-  We walked from one light pole to the other than ran the next- so on till we arrived at movies.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

As a child I attended the community church across from the creamery.  That was Sunday School days- When I was older started going to the catholic church east of town.

Back to the Memory Books

Sue Bush Cameron

Name: Susan Cameron

 

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

All my life

 

If you have lived here all or most of your life, why did you choose to stay?

Family

 

Issaquah or area school(s) attended:

Clark 2 years, Issaquah Middle, Issaquah High School

 

Family History in Issaquah:

Great Grandfather James and Martha Bush came here in 1864.

Grandparents- William and Eva Bush

Parents- Floyd and Esther Bush

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

1962 was the last class to graduate from the old school “where the pool is now.”

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

My favorite teacher was Roy Peterson, 6th grade teacher at the Middle School.

Jo Garner, secretary

I can remember one day I was in 6th or 7th grade and they used to make announcements on the intercom in the mornings. The principal played Elvis Presley’s Heartbreak Hotel. Everyone was surprised. Shocked!

I can also remember the mascot was a ceramic panther and it got broken. They took it behind the Gym and had a burial for it. Then the school kids raised money and got a new mascot. It was a cougar – dyed black. Which I think they still have.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

1949: I was in kindergarten.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

We went to Honeysuckle or the Shamrock.

Went roller-skating at Vasa Park.

We went bowling at the Hi Ten Bowling Alley.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I remember going to Brady’s Store. The fad in school was rock and roll jackets. They were black and white striped or pink, blue, etc., striped. I just had to have one. We bought a lot of clothes at Brady’s.

We also bought our shoes from Cussac’s shoe store. He was an old man that ran a shoe store next to Honeysuckle. He could always find me a pair of shoes that I always didn’t like. He was a nice man, though.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

It was a fad to rat your hair. Backcomb it all over, then smooth it out, but it was really high & full.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

We did our shopping at Tony & Johnny’s. They even delivered. I remember their friendliness. Ai Garner was their butcher.

My mom, Esther Bush, worked for Oscar’s grocery, so we bought a lot there, but it was a small store. It was where Gilman Village is now. There was a motel across the highway from it.

My favorite clerk was Harry Stevens. RR Grocery.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

All the time! It was a larger store. They had a meat market. Yes, we had a frozen food storage locker.

We shopped there up to the ’70s.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Yes. Victoria’s choc.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

When I turned 21 my mom took me to the Union Tavern. They would give you this very large mug on your birthday and everyone kept it filled. Need I say more?

Also the log tavern – I remember the spittoon on the floor.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

Hilda Corde

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

Changing Sunset Highway to Gilman Blvd.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Every year we went to the Labor Day parade. Saturday was the kids’ parade. Labor Day the Big Parade.

It was a big parade with lots of floats. I was in the parade a few times on the Rainbow Girls float.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Labor Day

The parade would go back to Memorial Field and be judged.

In that same area where library is now [Memorial Field], they would have a big carnival.

There was a bingo booth which the older people enjoyed.

Everyone loved the Carnival. One year they even had elephants. You could ride them.

They would have a beard growing contest. A fake jail would pick you up if you didn’t grow one.

Everyone just had fun.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

Pioneer Reunion.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

Yes. I liked to hike up Tiger Mt. Also Squak to the old house that burned down.

Also Yellow Lake – We liked to see all the frogs.

We used to walk up to Round and Tradition [lakes]. Then up to the Talus Caves. They were fun to explore.

We would walk along the Issaquah Creek to Lake Sammamish. It used to be pretty.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I was in the fishing derby every year. Never won though.

As a child I loved to fish. Next to my house on the Jordan Creek was one of the best fishing holes around. One day while fishing there a large tanker truck pulled up and dumped 20,000 trout fingerlings in front of our house by mistake!

For quite a few years after that the Jordan Creek had some of the best fishing in Issaquah. No matter where you went along that stream, you were almost guaranteed to catch a nice trout. This great fishing lasted for several years until the gravel pits started washing their gravel and dumping the waste water into the Jordan Creek. Repeated abuse to the Jordan Creek killed all the fish and the stream still suffers significantly to this very day.

 

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

I used to go roller skating there. At least 3 times a week. I started about 3 years old – went with older sisters Marilyn & Nan.

I went there until Ida & Howard Monty opened up Lake Hills skating rink.

I loved it. Met my friends there. I still keep in touch with some of them.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

We went swimming in our old swimming hole in Issaquah Creek. Each year it would change because creek changes from flooding.

We would fix it up and make fire pit sandy beach. Clean out creek. We could dive off banks in the deep places.

After a day of working in the hay fields, a nice swim sure felt good.

Sometimes we would get our innertubes and float to Lake Sammamish.

I remember as a kid going up to Uncle Dave’s and Aunt Myrtle’s lakes to ice skate. They would always have a large fire going to warm up by. Of course, I had no ice skates – just run and slide and slipped around. My parents would visit all their friends. Afterwards we always went into the house for hot chocolate and homemade cookies. I liked to go into their living room and lay on their Bear rug by the fireplace while others sat around kitchen table talking.

Each year someone would always check the ice to make sure it was safe. I remember one year Tony Walen did and it wasn’t. He was safe – got out real fast.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I remember my dad told me a story about the time he and Walter Trandum Jr. were at his father’s mill. Issaquah Mill Co. located behind today’s Milk Barn by Albertsons.

He was eight years old. They had been playing around the mill and were playing in this very large hollow stump. They got bored and went somewhere else to play and a few minutes later a large log came down the log flume or skid and jumped off somehow and hit the stump they had been playing in. It just exploded the stump. Boy, they were lucky.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

Have movies of the last one.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

The airfield across from barn. I enjoyed watching them parachute.

Some would land in our yard.

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

Car. Usually went to the Public Market.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

I can very clearly remember my first car. Like many young people it was one of the great moments of my youth. A car represented freedom and fun and my freedom and fun came in the form of a black 1949 Mercury with white pin striping and a V-8.

What a great car! I had purchased it from a gentleman named Bill who worked as a policeman for Issaquah. He had taken very good care of the car. It was lowered and had frenched headlights with tunnel taillights. The door handles were shaved and outside were electric push buttons to open the doors. The coolness factor of electric push buttons for your doors was high but if your battery ever went dead you were locked out!

After owning the car for several years I sold it to Tom Robertson for $75.00. He then sold it to Gordon Trehorne. Thereafter, I am not sure what became of my first car but boy did I have a lot of fun in it!

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I remember going with my mother, Esther Bush, to Pythian Sisters upstairs above Odd Fellows Hall. Where they had their meetings.

I was in Rainbow Girls.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

When in 3rd & 4th grade we could put money in a bank account through the school Each week I took 100 pennies that my Uncle Art Willet gave me. I forgot about it for years. They when I was 16 I took the money out and bought my first car.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

1.   Receptions.

2.   I remember the Issaquah Millwinders Hot Rod club. Put on a dance, The Drag Dance, there. It was sponsored by the Volunteer Fire Dept.

The Frantics were the entertainment and admission was $ (?).

It was about 1959-60.

Everyone had a blast!

The club earned money to build their 1934 Ford Roadster coupe.

Their meetings were held in Floyd Bush’s barn. Tom was president. Duane Johnson, Terri Fraker, Larry Pedegana, Obert Bogne, Tom Robertson, Cliff Isaacs, etc. members.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

My parents did.

 

 

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

Psycho – Joanie Gunderson and I sat in back row and hid behind the seat.

A few times. Saw lots of kissing going on there.

Saw lots of cowboy movies on Saturdays.

On Friday nights I remember there was lots of gum throwing. Had to cut some out of my hair a few times.

The Berrys owned it. But I don’t remember prices.

 

Churches

What church did you attend?  What memories do you have of this church?  Were there any pastors, reverends, or church leaders that stand out in your memory?

Every summer Mr. Hansen, a devoted member of the High Point Church, would come around to all the neighborhoods in town and convince us kids into attending summer Bible camp. He would get kids that normally would not have gone to church to attend.

In the early days of the Bible camp us kids were picked up in an old bus that Mr. Hansen and volunteers would drive. We nicknamed this old bus the Chicken Coupe. Because of its old looks and loud, rugged sound.

Mr. Martin Hansen’s wife, Florence, taught class there and also sang and played the church organ. At the end of summer Bible camp every year the Hansens would help us kids put on a play. We would sing and act and all the kids’ parents would come to watch. The plays were held at the church which is still standing today.

The Hansens made a positive impact on my life and the lives of many Issaquah youths. Their dedication and devotion to the High Point Church and the area’s many children is deserving of recognition and hopefully imitation.

Additional Memories

The lady who lived in a cave –

Back in the 1950s when I was a young girl, there was a lady who lived in a cave on the hillside where Cadman Sand and Gravel now resides. She was an odd lady who was very well known around town for her eccentric lifestyle.

The cave where she lived was fairly large and made up two sections. One was where she lived and the other section is where she stored things. Outside of the cave she kept her many animals staked to the ground and to trees so that they could not wander away. There were a variety of animals that she kept including pigs, chickens, cows and an old brown horse.

Due to the lack of grazing area by her cave, she would take her many animals and stake them up on the sides of the area’s roads and even next to people’s homes where her animals were famously known for getting into flowerbeds and gardens. Most people in town didn’t like her staking her animals up like this because often they would get loose and run through people’s yards. Once when she had staked her horse in front of my sister’s house, it bit me on the shoulder. I can remember running back into the house to show my mother my wound. After cleaning me up, off she went to give her a good tongue lashing for keeping her horse tied up in front of my sister’s house.

There was also a man who lived with her in the cave named Friday. He was a Hindu and had a big fuzzy beard with long hair and was always very scary looking to us kids. He could always be seen driving her old horse and buckboard wagon around town loading up grass and hay that they would cut from along side the roads. One time I remember my father giving Friday a trunk of his old clothes out of generosity. The next time we saw Friday, he was wearing all the clothes at once! He never changed those clothes. When one pair was no longer wearable, he would remove that pair and be ready to go with a new set underneath.

Every Sunday you could always find the lady that lived in the cave dressed in clean clothes, waiting in front of Oscars groceries for the bus that would take her into Seattle for church. I have been told by the few people she spoke to that she was a very intelligent person and that she had a hard childhood. This combination of smarts and hardship is probably what created her many eccentricities.

Sometime in the 1960s she and Friday were forced out of the cave they called home for many years. The expanding gravel pit engulfed the cave. I’m not sure where Friday went after this but she moved into a tent down by the old Standard Oil which was in the area where Gilman Village now stands. After living there in a tent for awhile she disappeared and never returned to Issaquah. No one is sure whatever happened to her but I will always remember her as the lady who lived in the cave.

 

Additional Memories

Often times I think of my grandmother, Eva Bush. The changes she saw. She came to Washington in 1970s from California. Came by ship then covered wagons to Fort Borst to her uncle, Joe Borst. Then on to Seattle to Dianna and Luther M. Collins for a time. Then to Fall City to Joseph and Kate Kanin Borst. She was just a little girl. Had 4 brothers & sisters. Her mother brought them. Her husband staying in California divorced.

Joseph Borst built them a house on the Snoqualmie river in Fall City. Her mom later married John Berry.

They moved to Issaquah, had a farm where they grew up. Her and her sister liked to ride their horse around the valley. In their teens. There were no cars hardly any other white people. The Snoqualmie Indians were her best friends as well as cousins. She lived with Alice Rascher, Eva Borst. Married William Tap Bush (1885) had 13 children – 2 died.

I remember her when I was in my teens sitting in her rocking chair. Telling me stories. She would make homemade bread with real churned butter. Boy it was good. She died in 1957.

Lawrence Campbell (left) with little sister Jean, circa 1928.

Lawrence Campbell

Lawrence Campbell (left) with little sister Jean, circa 1928.

Lawrence Campbell (left) with little sister Jean, circa 1928.

Name: Lawrence Campbell

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

I played football and track.- Coach Morgan

 

What memories do you have of Minnie Schomber, or another favorite teacher?

I remember Miss Martin. It seems to me Minnie Schomber was a part time teacher.  She was also on the draft board.  She sent me a greeting card.

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

I was in Seattle.

 

Education—Coming of Age

What kind of extracurricular activities were you involved in?  Did you play football or chess, or did you act in the school plays?  What were memorable games or plays?

I played football in 1933 – 36  and 1937. Gordon Crosby and me bumped heads.  I got banged up bad. My Mother wouldn’t let me play in 1934.  Dr. Hillery saw my Mother and Father and they let me play Junior and Seniors years.  I was in one play.  Dock Hillery patched me up.

 

Where did you and your friends spend your free time as teenagers?  What kind of mischief did you get into?  How did your parents or teachers punish you when you got into trouble?

Dave Bonner and me hiked all over Tiger Mtn.  and Squak Mtn.  I fished the Issaquah Creek most people don’t know the  creek was closed.  I hunted deer an also trapped.

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

Andy Wold – Sunset Way and Front Street. I also remember Punk Wold and Lewis Hardware.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

I remember Lewis Barber Shop next to the Ford garage.  I would tell Dave to give me a depression haircut (short).

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

I remember Tom real well. I would by hooks and B.B’s.  I still like the old floor.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

I didn’t shop, my Mother did.

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

I shopped there. I rented a locker there.  I remember “Puck” Pickering was shot in a robbery.  It was a great old store.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

I went to both places, the XXX was the best.  I remember Dave Morgan had a XXX on Sunset Way.  It was later moved.

 

Did you go to Boehm’s Candies?  What candies were your favorites?

Once in a while.

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

Log Tavern. I still remember the running water where the old timers spit.

Paul Koss had the tavern. Then someone by the name of John Fook took it over.

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Never shopped there.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I remember they were in the corner across from the old bank building . I remember him and his wife.

 

Local Politics

What important local political issues of Issaquah are memorable?  Do any particular politicians stand out?  Why are they memorable?  What did they accomplish while in office?

I remember Stella Alexander also when she lived   Her husband had a blacksmith shop where Dr. Perkins is now. She cleaned house and was later recalled.

 

What do you recall about Mayor Stella Alexander, the first female mayor of Issaquah (elected in 1933)?  Were there any other local politicians or political activities that drew scandalous attention?

I remember Bill Flintoft.  He knew how to get what he wanted.

 

The Great Depression

What are your memories of the Great Depression?  Did you have a job at this time?  What ways did you try to save money?  What did you eat?

I was born 2-3-17 in Issaquah.  In 1937 I got a job at the Issaquah Mill (Person and Erickson) The pay was $4.00 a day. Hard work!  $4.00 a day when in so many people had none. You learned to save money. It is not this way now.  My Dad had a small farm so we did have food.

 

World War II

How did World War II affect the town of Issaquah?  Did you know men or women who went to fight in the war?  Did you leave Issaquah to join the war efforts?

I joined the Marines. Boot camp was bad.  I was 28 years old when I went in.  I joined the V.F.W.

Ray Smart was shot down over Italy.  He was close friend.

 

How did the Japanese Internment affect Issaquah?  Did you know men and women who were taken to Internment Camps?

Don’t remember any.

 

What kinds of jobs did the War bring to the area?  Where did you work at this time?

I was working at Boeing when the Japs bombed Pearl Harbor.  Later went to McChord Field then the U.S.M.C.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

Labor Day the most fun . Salmon Days is so crowded you can’t walk.  I remember when they had the Rodeo. It was a lot of fun in Issaquah.  The Taverns was closed so no fights, only fun.  I miss that Rodeo more than Salmon Days.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Labor Day was the best .  Every one was happy.  Now things have changed.

 

What are your memories of the Rodeo?

I remember the Rodeo and the fence around it.  I walked home on the R.R. tracks and an Indian was ahead of me.  I stopped and then went by him.  He looked mean to me.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

I remember when the Issaquah Creek went over the road.  Dave Bonner had a Model T Ford and said, “ I might as well take the radiator cap off and fill the radiator.”  The water was that deep.

Pete Favini and Archie Adair picked a Ditch across the road and in an hour the water cut a 50 ft. ditch .  Later they made a dike.

I remember Tyee’s house burned down.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you spend a lot of your free time outside?  What do you remember about fishing, hunting, or hiking in the area?  What was your favorite hiking trail?

I spent a lot of time outside.  There was no trails you made you own.  Dave Bonner and me hiked from Harris Mine to Beckers (Sycamore).  There were four mountains to cross.

We shot a 207lb four point and then we tried to see who shot it. (never did know).

Dave Bonner and me found the caves above Lake Tradition in the 30’s. Forty years later, said they found the caves.

 

What type of fish did you catch?   How many trout did you catch in the Issaquah Creek and what was the biggest?  Did you fish in the kids fishing derby held in Issaquah?  Were your methods for fishing and hunting any different than they are today?

I lost count how many fish I caught out of the Issaquah Creek.  The longest was twenty -two inches. I learned later it was a Steelhead.  I fished above the spill-way and met Ivar Darst. He gave me hell, said that was his part of the Creek, mine was above the spill way (down).   He then laughed.

The creek was full of red fish in the fall. I can’t go into that.  In early days the King  Salmon never came up the creek.  I caught 30 Steelhead out of Tokul Creek in one year.

What are your memories of Vasa Park?  What did you do while there?

Swimming and skating; once in awhile a dance.

 

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

Rich Holder and I walked down to the Lake Sammamish.  Their was a pier north of the boat launch.  We swam and played tag on the log out in the lake.  We asked Hans Jenson if we could have some of his apples.  He said don’t take a bite and leave them.  He also said don’t break my fence down.  He was a very nice man.

We sent into Horrocks pond and fished. It was real good.  Guess he would let us if we asked him.

 

Logging and Sawmills

How did the logging industry affect Issaquah?  How did it change?  Did you work in logging?  For what logging camp or sawmill?  What do you remember of your logging days?  What type of machines did you use for logging?  How did you transport logs? How large were these logs?

I wasn’t a logger.  High Point logged the north side of Tiger Mountain. Wood and Iverson logged the south side.

 

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

Dave Bonner and me worked for Erickson and Pearson.   We bucked logs to length…  hard work.   On day we rolled a log on the carriage and it was full of  bees.  Guess you know that cleared the place.  They blamed up but we really didn’t know .  I’m sure if we knew about the bees we still have rolled it on the carriage anyway.  I didn’t know Erland Pearson could move that fast.  He was a dogger on the carriage.

 

Do you remember when there was a fire at the mill?  Did you help fight it?  Did you see the fire?

I saw the fire from my Dad’s house…hot! hot!  A  fire large you don’t forget it.  It was where 2nd Ave. and Hobart Road met. Dodge build a house there later.

 

Salmon hatchery

How has the salmon hatchery affected Issaquah?

Of late the Hatchery has helped Issaquah Salmon days for one. They planted King Salmon.  There wasn’t any  before the Hatchery.  I think the WPA saved it.

 

Farming and Dairy

Were you involved with farming in Issaquah?  What farm did you work on?  What was grown or raised there?

My Dad had a small farm; one cow, one pig, chickens and a garden.  We did real good.

 

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

I remember the green grass and not asphalt.  I remember the Sky Port and also the K.K.K. meeting in 1924.

 

Did you work at the Issaquah Creamery, or what is now Darigold?

No.  I remember Hans Foster

 

Railroad—Transportation

Did you travel frequently into Seattle?  How did you get there?  What did you do while in Seattle?

No. Bus ran slow.

 

How did the construction of I-90 change life in Issaquah?

It changed Issaquah but the Metro Sewer is what changed the valley.

 

What was your first car?  Did you buy it from Hepler Ford Motors, Stonebridge Chevrolet, or the Kaiser-Frazier dealership?

A 1939 Chevrolet I bought if from Fink  My Dad bought a Model T from Hepler.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I belong to the Eagles for over 30 yrs.

 

Did you attend the Sportsmen’s Club?  Do you remember when it was built in 1937?  What did you do at the Sportsmen’s Club?

I could hear all the shooting.  My Dad won a pig there once.

 

What types of events did you attend at the Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) Hall?  Did you use the shooting range located in the basement?

No.

 

Did you attend dinners, dances, banquets, or other events in the upstairs Grange Meeting Hall?

Yes.

 

Mining

Do you have any memories of Issaquah’s mining days?  Were you involved in mining?

I wasn’t involved. May Dad mined for 40years.  I went down in the Grand  Ridge Mine and came back to the top.  My Dad started the mines on Tiger Mountain and the Pacific Coal Company. He also mined at Niblocks.

 

What were the working conditions like in the mine? Which mine did you work for, and what was your job?

Never mined; my Dad wouldn’t let me.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

I remember the silent movie.  I think the cost was a dime.

 

Front Street

My Mother shopped at Fishers Meat. I always went.  Bill Haglin always gave me a hot dog

I also remember Finney Meat Market

I also remember Peters Realtor

I also remember Fred Cussac.

I also remember Honeysuckle

I also remember Union Tavern

 

Additional Memories

A short history of the Campbells

My Dad was born in 1884 in Penn. He came to the Oregon Territory in 1884 at six weeks old.  He was here before Washington was a state.  The Campbells settled on Tiger Mountain on about one hundred acres.

When my Dad, also Lawrence,  was 14 years old he started in the mines. He retired at 62 years.   He cleared the right of way from Issaquah to the Hobart Road.  He built a five bedroom house south of the bus barn.  I remember the water tower for the trains. Some of it was a hobo jungle.

My Dad died at 83 years old.  My Mother, Lydia Holder,  was a great cook.  She sure worked very hard.

My family was made up of one son and four daughters.  The children were: Dorothy,  Gertrude, Ruth, Lawrence and Jean.  A daughter, Martha, died at an early age.

Back to the Memory Books

Richard Carlson

Name:Richard A. Carlson

Birth Date or Year (optional): 1926

Your history in Issaquah/How long lived here, etc.:

Lived in or around Issaquah 1948 to 1959 and again 1962-67.  I was with the Issaquah Schools 1948-1982.

If you moved to Issaquah, why did you choose it?

I came here to teach, as I wished to be in western Washington.  (I grew up in SW Washington).

 

Education—Coming of Age

What are your memories of Issaquah High School?  Which teachers were influential?

My only memories of IHS are the four years I taught eighth grade there – (1948-1952).

 

Were you affected by earthquake damage to the schools in 1949 or 1965?

Yes, I’ll never forget the north wall of my room undulating in the quake. (In the old high school)

 

Local businesses

What local businesses do you remember?  What items did you purchase there?  Who owned the business?  Where was it located?  What do you remember most about it?

I patronized most of those which were there from the late 40s until the late 50s, when we moved to Renton.

Remembered: John Kramer’s Market (Sunset), Hepler’s Garage, Issaquah Press (Front St.), Fischer’s Market (Front), Thomas Furniture (Front), Tony & Johnnie’s (Front), Busy Bee Restaurant (Front), Honeysuckle (Front), Dick and Alex’s Automotive (Sunset), 10¢ Store (Front), Moser’s Grocery (Front), Lawill Drugs (Front), Mike Shain’s restaurant (Front), Nick’s Café (Sunset), Feed Store (corner), Grange Supply (Front).

Business I remember most is Tom Drylie’s Honeysuckle. I used to chat with him. He told me much about Issaquah history. He also cashed small checks for me.

 

What barbershop or beauty shop did you frequent?  What do you remember about these places?  What were the popular hairdos when you frequented the beauty shop?  Did you do a lot of socializing at the barber and beauty shops?

Paul’s Barber Shop. Paul frequently reminded me that I should be properly baptized. I had a few haircuts at Dave Lewis’ Barber Shop. (Paul Benson) Paul had cut hair for three generations of some Issaquah families.

 

What is memorable about Lewis Hardware?  What items did you purchase there?

It had a reputation for having almost anything needed in the way of hardware.

 

Where did you go to buy your groceries?  Did you go to Tony and Johnny’s, or RR Grocery on East Sunset? Do you remember your favorite clerk?  Were there any items that these grocers specialized in?

Mostly, over my 11 years living in Issaquah I (we) shopped at the Grange Supply. There were two long-time female clerks I remember: Rose and Mrs. Bergsma. (I think.)

 

Did you purchase things at the Grange Mercantile Building?  What type of things did you get there?  Did your family rent a frozen food storage locker?

I bought my groceries there most of the time between 1954 and 1959, when I lived on Mine Hill.

 

What restaurants or soda shops did you enjoy going to?  Did you go to Rena’s Café, or XXX Root beer?  What was your favorite food?  Were there memorable waiters or waitresses?

When I first roomed in the old Gibson house, I usually ate my dinners at the XXX. That’s where I first met Ted Stonebridge. I only stayed in the Gibson house for a month, then moved to Kebiertz Cabins west of the fish hatchery.

I walked to school my first year, so I usually stopped at the Busy Bee for breakfast. In later years I stopped at Mike Shain’s place or the Fiesta Café often for coffee or snacks. Of course, in later years Fasano’s became very popular. (on Front Street)

 

What saloons or local bars did you and your friends frequent?

As a teacher, I didn’t go into local bars within Issaquah. Several times I stopped at Goode’s Corner and the Airport Tavern. In the latter I several times met a local “regular” who would always tell me, “You teachers are all right.” (He was usually “in his cups” at the time.)

 

What do you remember about Grange Supply?

Only that I shopped for groceries there. I do remember that one evening Pick (Mr. Pickering) was robbed at gun point.

 

What do you recall about Lawill’s drug store?

I remember Mr. Lawill, a rather quiet man, as I shopped there during the years I resided in and around Issaquah. Later, in the 50s, I believe, a competitor opened a shop south of Lawill’s shop on Front St.

 

Issaquah Round-Up—Salmon Days—Labor Day Celebrations

What do you remember about Labor Day Celebrations or Salmon Days?

I particularly remember the Labor Day celebrations of my early teaching years as I helped at the gate to the Carnival always held at the city field. I remember that the local taverns did a good business on labor Days.

 

What special activities were there at Labor Day Celebrations, or at Salmon Days?  How has Salmon Days changed over time?

Every Labor Day Celebration had a parade, a carnival and busy taverns.

Salmon Days developed pretty much after I retired in 1982, as I recall.

 

Special Occasions

What were some of the other memorable special events and occasions in Issaquah?

I remember that Les Lahrie and his orchestra played the local dance hall during the late 40s. He always kept time with his wooden leg I have been told.

 

Outdoor Recreation

Did you go swimming in the local lakes in the summer?  Or ice-skating at the Horrock’s Farm in the winter?

There were a number of resorts along Lake Sammamish during my teaching years: Smith’s Sandy Beach, Parr’s Park, the park near Monohon (Alexander’s), and later, the state park.

 

Logging and Sawmills

Do you remember the Monohon Mill, the Red Hall sawmill by the fish hatchery, the High Point Mill, the Preston Mill, or the Issaquah Lumber Company Mill on Front Street South?

When I was with the Issaquah schools only the Preston Mill and Red Hall’s mill were operative. I often drank coffee with Red Hall, because he was known to “make the rounds” each day for coffee.

 

Farming and Dairy

Do you have any memories of Pickering Farm?

I roomed and boarded 1952-53 with the Roy Pickerings on part of the farm, I believe.

 

Fraternal Organizations—Local Halls

What are your memories of the fraternal organizations?  Did you belong to the Elks Lodge, or Lions Club, etc?

I belonged to the Lions and the Jaycees for a few years, but I was not much interested in lodges.

 

Entertainment

What movies did you go to see at the Issaquah Theatre (the Old Movie House) to see?  How much did movies cost?  Did you ever go to the back upper corner of the theatre to kiss?

In my early years in Issaquah the theater was owned and operated by an older couple. It seemed to be loaded with noisy kids on Friday nights so I never attended films there. Later on, the Pine Lake Presbyterian Church managed it for a number of years under Pastor Bob Gray.

 

Additional Memories

I spent 34 years with the Issaquah schools – 14 as a teacher, 5 as a vice principal and 15 as a principal – all at the junior high level. My career was from 1948 to 1982. I have most happy memories of my Issaquah experiences. When I began teaching the 8th grade in the old high school in 1948 many of the town’s old timers were still living.

In 1948 the Issaquah School District had about 1100 children and about 40 teachers. I’m sure that it is much, much larger now.

Several of the teachers who were around during my early years are either living in the area. I know of Ed Maloof (Mercer Island), Frances Crelly (Seattle), Bill Klein (Issaquah), Ken Schmelzer (Issaquah) and Roy Peterson (Issaquah). At least that’s where they were when I last knew.

Although I doubt if I’d want to be starting a teaching career these days, my Issaquah years were good years and I was fortunate in being able to associate with many fine community adults and kids.

Over the years, Issaquah grew from a small town of 900 to a suburban area that was much more sophisticated. This was a good experience, as I grew up in a small town.

Knowing that, Ed K. Erickson, the superintendent who hired me, always claimed that he “put shoes on me and gave me a job.”

I did have several coincidences with my home town, Bucoda, WA, where I grew up. Tom Hall came from there in the late 1920s to that town where his sister Violet lived. I understand that they were both members of the Hall Family who still own the wrecking yard on the Hobart Road. As a growing kid, I was told about Tom’s widely known bootleg practices while in Issaquah. He himself, once told me how many times he got caught. Phoebe (Friend) Martinis told me of her childhood years in Issaquah, where her father  — Mr. Friend – was a mine foreman. She was apparently related to the Hays.