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Making History: 1980s & 1990s

Join us for a series of weekly Author and Ghostwriter Kim Pearson teaches Making History workshop participants a comprehensive, easy to use, and fun method of exploring the times of their lives against a backdrop of historical events. She will lead them on a wild gallop through 20 years, from 1980 through 1999, exploring how they made a difference, what they contributed, what they witnessed, and how they can share their stories with others. They learn how to access buried memories through interactive techniques, sharing exercises, and non-critical discussion. They hear great stories from others and recount their own.

Workshop Description

Making History workshops are based on Kim Pearson’s book Making History: how to remember, record, interpret and share the events of your life, briefly described on the following page. Because all workshops feature sharing, a minimum of six attendees is required. Purchase your tickets here through Eventbrite.

Eighties & Nineties Four-Week Workshop

One 90-minute session per week for 4 weeks; classes to be held on March 3, March 10, March 17, and March 24 from 10:00 AM until 11:30 AM at the Issaquah Depot.

This workshop covers the twenty years from 1980 through 1999, and all eight categories from Making History:

  • Economics & Politics
  • The Social Fabric
  • War & International
  • Technology & Science
  • Crime & Disaster
  • Arts & Entertainment
  • Lifestyle Activities
  • The Weird & Trivial

 

Participants learn and receive:

  • Entertaining “gallop” through the eight categories in Making History
  • Handouts of writing topic suggestions/questions for each category
  • Historical timelines handouts for each category
  • Detailed instruction in “Write to Remember Rules”
  • Class discussion of interpretation and sharing methods
  • Notebook for writing memory vignettes in class
  • Time to write, share, and listen to stories
  • 40% discount on the book Making History (purchase not necessary)

In this enjoyable workshop, participants receive many freebies. Kim hands out copies of timelines, sample topic questions, and notebooks. Participants also receive a discount on her book Making History, based on the workshops she has been teaching for nearly 20 years.

 

About Kim Pearson

Kim Pearson is an author, ghostwriter, and the owner of Primary Sources, a writing service that helps others become authors of polished, professional, and compelling books. She is the author of fifteen books, including award-winning Making History: how to remember, record, interpret and share the events of your life; and Dog Park Diary (ghostwritten for a dog!) She has ghostwritten (for people) more than 45 non-fiction books and memoirs, which tell the stories of a wide variety of people and cover a broad range of topics, from saxophones to finance, city histories to hypnotherapy, psychic horses to constipation, and many points in between. Her online program “Learn to Ghost” teaches others the fine art of ghostwriting. She teaches workshops and teleclasses on writing, history, and storytelling.

Registration

Register for this workshop series on Eventbrite. The cost for all four workshops is $50 ($40 for members of the Issaquah History Museums).

 

 

 

 

Valentine send to Mrs. August Berg in 1917.

Valentine Play Date & Trolley Time

Celebrate St. Valentine’s Day with the Issaquah History Museums! On Saturday, February 10, kids of all ages can admire Valentines from the Museums’ collection, talk about how we show others that we care about them, and make their own Valentine. The Issaquah Valley Trolley will also be running from 11 AM until 3 PM, so you can snuggle up with your sweetie for a ride on the rails. Activities are free with museum admission ($5 per person; free for IHM members).

IHM 2004-11-27

The Squak Valley Hot Shots

The Squak Valley Hot Shots were an all-women’s jug band that grew out of the Eagles Club. Although membership in the group changed over time, the Squak Valley Hot Shots played together from 1957 to 1980. The Hot Shots were a much-anticipated part of the Labor Day festivities; they were also recording artists! The homegrown group produced at least one 45 record in their career, and they played gigs throughout the Puget Sound area. In 1977, they helped the Seattle Sounders celebrate Issaquah Day at the King Dome be performing during halftime. Another hallmark of their career was a 1974 performance at Governor Wes Uhlman’s innauguration ball, in Olympia. Ida Mae Bergsma commented on some of their swankier appointments in a 1976 newspaper article, saying, “It’s not easy walking into a classy place like the Olympic Hotel carrying a wash tub.”

Although their line-up was generally all-female, the band occasionally called upon men to fill in for missing players. One undated clipping from the band’s scrapbook notes that, during an appearance in the North Bend parade, Dave Morgan filled in for Gladys Morgan, and “with his wig, dress and pantaloons, made a fine looking girl.”

Just before the end of 2017, the Issaquah History Museums received a group of unique artifacts pertaining to the Squak Valley Hot Shots. The IHM already preserves a number of photographs and other documents relating the the Hot Shots. Now some of the original musical instruments used by the Hot Shots have joined the community’s collection. Among the instruments donated were a washtub and broom, a washboard and wooden spoon (which also doubled as an identifying sign), an amplified kazoo and maracas.

Want to dig deep into the topic? You can see photos of the Squak Valley Hot Shots, and peruse their scrapbook (kindly loaned to us to  copy by June Nissley Willard) in our online Digital Collections. Members of the Squak Valley Hot Shots included Chattie Adair, Ida Mae Bergsma,  Madge Brundage, Pat Cammon, Mae Daverso, Edna Diedrich, Virvae Reed Dieringer, Jean Gregg, Eleanor Kramer, Irene McDiarmid, Kaye McElfresh, Gladys Morgan, Eleanor Munden, Beryl Nelson, Frances Nissley, Eileen Pennington, Faye Straub, Edna Uber, Alice Varner, and May Williams.

(Below, left: The Squak Valley Hot Shots, circa 1960. Below, right: washboard and band sign today)

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Issaquah 125th Logo

Quasquicentennial: Issaquah’s 125th

Quasquicentennial: Issaquah’s 125th



On April 29, the City of Issaquah kicked off a year-long celebration of Issaquah, in honor of the town’s  quasquicentennial – or 125th birthday! The festivities will include a time capsule full of things that symbolize Issaquah as it is today. The time capsule will eventually rest beneath one of the school cornerstones behind the Gilman Town Hall, and will be opened in 2092 for Issaquah’s bicentennial celebration.

A time capsule is a great way to represent Issaquah as it is right now. The Issaquah History Museums are creating their own digital time capsule, filled with 125 things from Issaquah’s past. For each year since Issaquah’s incorporation, we are sharing a photograph, artifact, oral history, article, or other history-related goody. Follow up on Facebook to see these posts immediately, or visit this page.

And remember: it’s your history, Issaquah. We’re just keeping it for you.

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Today’s Post


1984
Al Swanson, Ellen Goleeke, Bill Goleeke, and Ed Dean at the opening of the Town Hall at Providence Point, 1987.

Providence Point: From Chicken Farms to Retirement Community

by Joan Newman

The story of Providence Point, the spacious retirement community off S. E. 43rd Way above Lake Sammamish, begins over 50 years ago when it was “unimproved stump land,” according to Brad Best, a Providence Point resident who founded Brad Best Realty in Redmond in 1955.

Best provided some of the site’s history recently, as did E. J. “Bud” Dale, a member of the Providence Point Planning Committee, who has located and preserved a notebook and other materials outlining the development history as compiled by early residents.

In the 1950s, said Best, developed land on the Sammamish Plateau was chiefly in chicken and mink farms, operated by local families such as the Erickson brothers Edward, Theo and Tuano, and Bill and Faye Sween. But Plateau property was selling so fast, he said, that although he created a color-coded chart to show how many times each property sold, he couldn’t keep up with it.

Owners of the property which eventually became Providence Point were retired chicken farmers Earl Miller and his wife Dorothy, and Walter and Monica Gwin. Best’s files show that Charles J. Johnston owned adjacent land and later granted a right-of-way into the property.

In the mid-1950s the Sisters of Providence were looking for a site for a new college for the training of teaching nuns. Best picked up the Sisters in West Seattle and walked the Miller and Gwin properties with them. “I’m a Presbyterian,” he warned them. “Well, we hope to convert you!” they answered.

Because there were no roads into the site, he took the Sisters up Duthie Hill Road and they tramped in on an old logging railroad grade which ran west through the property downhill to Monohon, a lumber mill town on Lake Sammamish until 1925. (The Monohon mill burned down that year, but was eventually re-built and operated into the 1940s.)

The Sisters bought 240 acres in 1957 and built Providence Heights College of Sister Formation, one of six major academic units at Seattle University. The College opened in 1962, combining a college education with professional studies which prepared  graduates for teaching, nursing and other specialties. Mother Mary Philothea was Dean.

By 1969, however, enrollment had dropped and the Sisters closed the College. They stayed on to run an educational conference center, used by Boeing, the State Patrol and many school organizations for training and professional meetings until 1976. The property was then sold to the Lutheran Bible Institute (LBI) in 1978, the Sisters expressing pleasure that educational as well a religious activities would continue there.

Other potential purchasers had been Pacific Northwest Bell, which wanted to use the buildings for an employee training center, and the State of Washington, which wanted to train state and local police at the facility. The legislature approved that purchase but it was not funded, according to the Providence Point History Notebook.

LBI, later re-named Trinity Lutheran College, sold 180 of the original acres to Swanson-Dean Corporation in 1979 to develop a retirement community, with a provision for continuing education as well as other amenities. A Community Advisory Committee was established to help with a Development Plan for Providence Point. Its members are listed in the History Notebook as Bob Small, then Dean of Architecture at the University of Washington; Bob Johnson, the retired sales manager of Panorama City, in Lacey WA; and Marty Wilson, a “TV Personality and Seniors Advocate.”

King County approved the Swanson-Dean project, stipulating among other things that Providence Point must purchase an extension ladder for an Issaquah fire truck because three-story buildings were planned, and must provide an “internal transportation system” to minimize the increased traffic to be produced.

Al Swanson, Ellen Goleeke, Bill Goleeke, and Ed Dean at the opening of the Town Hall at Providence Point, 1987.

Al Swanson, Ellen Goleeke, Bill Goleeke, and Ed Dean at the opening of the Town Hall at Providence Point, 1987.

Ground was broken for Providence Point in 1983 with Lt. Governor John Cherberg attending. The central “Town Hall,” with property management and real estate offices and a large meeting hall, (and later Stromboli’s Restaurant and now Bake’s Place jazz restaurant) was dedicated in May, 1984. Balloons were released and the Seattle All-City Band marched past. The first ten condominiums were occupied by August, by new homeowners from Seattle, Bellingham, the San Juan Islands, Bellevue, Redmond, Issaquah and Enumclaw.

The first residents were Pastor Erman Lunder, a professor emeritus from LBI and his wife Stella.Their previous home had been on a busy street.”The first night [at Providence Point] was so quiet you could hear yourself think,” they said.

The fifth residents, Archie and Mildred Gunderson, also wrote a short memoir for the History Notebook, noting that the nearest grocery story was “in Issaquah on Front St.….QFC [at Pine Lake]was to be opened soon and new Safeways were something for the future.” Mildred was especially pleased that “one winter morning when there was a little snow on the ground, we looked out our dining room window to see deer tracks and two spots where two animals had bedded down…probably on their way to the lake from the woods.”

Today there are 1300 residents in 1008 condominiums in seven “villages.” The first organization formed was “Communiversity,” which is still an immensely popular, resident-run program providing courses and seminars over a broad range of topics and skills, supported by homeowners’ dues and small attendance fees for others.

The original campus acres are now owned by The City Church. The Sammamish YMCA conducts its programs in the Sisters’ former gym and pool.

Joan Newman is one of several Providence Point residents who volunteer for the Issaquah History Museums.

 

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Previous


2000-5-3

1982

In 1982, Issaquah resident Dorothy Jackson captures old Issaquah in a one of a series of paintings. #Issaquah125

1980

1980

In 1980, Issaquah’s Waterhole Tavern blows up, leaving many suspicious of mob activity. #Issaquah125

Issaquah ordinance 1297

1978

In 1978, Issaquah passes Ordinance 1297, which deals the the remnants of Issaquah’s mining heritage. #Issaquah125

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1977

Between the late 1960s and late 1970s, the The Issaquah High School Jazz band, led by William Klein, put out annual albums. #Issaquah125

biomed

1976

In 1976, the Seattle Biomedical Center (today’s Center for Infectious Disease Research, in Seattle) is created — in Issaquah! #Issaquah125

Issaquah High Trestle

1975

In 1975, the Issaquah trestle is slowly dismantled to make way for an I-90 overpass. #Issaquah125

2001-20-2

1974

In the 1970s, rapid development encourages concerned citizens to found Issaquah Residents for Environmental Quality (IREQ). #Issaquah125

2003-7-8

1973

In 1973, Under the direction of Chief Ron Procise, the Issaquah Police Department purchases a white Dodge patrol car. It was just one of a few changes that Procise made as Police Chief in the early 1970s. #Issaquah125

2002-28-1

1972

In 1972, Betty Konarski, owner of the Country Mouse consignment store, convinces Marvin and Ruth Mohl to scrap their plans to create another strip mall, and to create what would be Gilman Village instead. #Issaquah125

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1972

In 1972, Ithe Issaquah Historical Society (today’s Issaquah History Museums) is founded by a group of long-time residents. #Issaquah125

Salmon in Issaquah Creek,

1970

In 1970, the first Salmon Days celebration is held and roughly 2,500 people attend. Salmon Days has continued to grow and change over the years. #Issaquah125

Gibson House

1970

In 1970, Dr. W.E. Gibson’s home, built circa 1900, is razed. The rare gingko tree, planted by Gibson circa 1910, is spared thanks to petitioners. Issaquah’s gingko is considered one of Issaquah’s Treasures. #Issaquah125

2004-11-108

1969

In 1969, the last Labor Day celebration takes place in Issaquah. The following year would mark the beginning of Issaquah’s Salmon Days tradition. #Issaquah125

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1968

In 1968, the new sewer treatment plant pump station opens. The event is presided over by Miss Issaquah Colleen Dixon and Mayor Bill Flintoft. #Issaquah125

Han Jensen (1888-1957) left his property to the State of Washington. Today it is part of the Lake Sammamish Park in Issaquah.

1966

In 1966, a new youth camping area is dedicated in Lake Sammamish State Park. #Issaquah125

Irving Petite with bovine companion, 1978.

1963

In 1963, Irving Petite, a Tiger Mountain resident since 1941, publishes a book called “Mister B,” about the orphaned bear he took in. Petite authored a number of other books inspired by his life on Tiger Mountain. #Issaquah125

2001-30-4

1962

In 1962, the Issaquah Junior High School football team wins the district’s first junior high football championship. #Issaquah125

In this 1961 photograph, a new sign is installed on the corner of Tenth Avenue and Sunset Way. Bill Bergsma is replacing the signs and the lady in the background is Gladys Lelane with her husband. [IHM 72.021.014.187B]

1961

In 1961, Bill Bergsma, Sr. changes the street sign from Front Street to 10th Avenue after the 1960 Issaquah City ordinance 752 changes the names of many downtown streets. Mill Street, for example, became Sunset Way. Main Street became Andrews Street. #Issaquah125

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1960

In 1958, Labor Day “I’m a Booster” pins are given to those who donated funds towards Issaquah’s Labor Day celebrations. #Issaquah125

Jake Jones Jr.

1959

In 1959, Jacob Jones, Jr. passes away. Before his death, Jones’s grandson recorded an oral history of his grandfather in which Jones shared some of his earliest memories of the Issaquah Valley in the 1880s. #Issaquah125

1958 telegram announcing closure of the Issaquah Depot.

1958

In 1958, Freight service to Issaquah Depot is discontinued and the Depot is officially decommissioned. #Issaquah125

[IHM 2002.035.001]

1956

In 1956, Labor Day Queen contestants include Lois Nissley, Jackie Deering, Myrna Treharne, Barbara Johnson, Patricia Yourglich, and Ronaele Hellum. Lois Nissley was chosen as Queen. #Issaquah125

Labor Day Queen and her court in 1955. [IHM fic-2002-46c]

1955

In 1955, Labor Day Queen Daisy Santa is crowned. In this photo she is surrounded by her court. #Issaquah125

1054 Labor Day Parade Grand Marshals [IHM 2005.032.002]

1954

In 1954, Will and Anna Brooks are Grand Marshalls of the Labor Day Parade that ends on Memorial Field. The Brooks owned a dairy farm in the Issaquah Valley. #Issaquah125

Washington State Bank

1953

In 1953, this photo is taken of the the Washington State Bank. Formerly the Bank of Issaquah, the bank was remodeled in 1949. The unfinished north side of the building indicates a belief that an adjacent building would be constructed in that location. 50 years later, the side is still exposed and still unfinished. #Issaquah125

James Hooker "Pinky" Hailstone, far right, with wife Dorothy and children Candy and Don.

1952

In 1952, Labor Day “criminals” peer from behind bars. They were convicted of being caught without a beard, and were not released until bail, a hefty one-dollar fine, was paid. #Issaquah125

Mayor Bill Flintoft

1951

In 1951, Bill Flintoft is appointed to Issaquah’s City Council. He goes on to serve as Issaquah’s Mayor, a position he holds longer than any other before him. #Issaquah125

July 25 1950

1950

In 1950, Malinda, the daughter of Issaquah High band director Bill Klein, wanders off and is lost for 4 hours, inspiring a number of townspeople to join the hunt. #Issaquah125

Ray Robertson

1949

In 1949, Raymond J. Robertson serves as Town Marshal. One of the changes he brings about is the purchase of Issaquah’s first squad car. #Issaquah125

Kiwanis Follies program

1948

In 1948, the Issaquah Kiwanis Club hosts the Kiwanis Follies, a variety show emceed by writer Richard Erickson, publisher of the Town Crier newspaper. Soda sales at intermission benefit the Issaquah High PTA. #Issaquah125

Introducing 1948 Ford models at Hepler Auto Sales

1947

In 1947, Hepler Auto Sales premieres the 1948 Ford models at this community celebration. #Issaquah125

Handkerchief

1945

In 1945, Rose Koss Croston owns this handkerchief. She jas three sons (James, Roy, and Elsworth) who serve in the military during World War II. #Issaquah125

Wilbur Pickering in uniform in 1944

1944

In 1944, Wilbur Pickering is one of many young men in Issaquah who enlists to serve their country during World War II. Wilbur served in the Marines. #Issaquah125

World War II ration book of stamps used to purchase certain items during the war. Was issued to Andrew L Wold by the Office of Price Administration. [IHM 88.010.001]

1943

In 1943, this ration book was issued to Andy Wold, as World War II continued. #Issaquah125

Four men of varying ages stand backstage at the Village Theatre in Issaquah in 1942. Left to right: Theatre owner John D. Brunsberg, Lester Alvin "Smiley" Burnette, Gene Autry, and John Daniel "Danny" Brunsberg. The oral history that came with the image is that Danny is 17 in the picture; he was born in 1925. His father, John D., died in 1943. Gene Autry left his Hollywood career for military service in World War II in July of 1942, so this picutre was probably taken earlier that year.
The black and white image was probably a professional p.r. shot, taken as part of a personal appearance tour done by Autry and Burnette to promote one of their many films together. They are both in western costume, as they would be for their film characters. The comic Burnette is in a silly hat with extra-large turned-up brim and loose neckerchief over a checked shirt, and Autry is in his trademark white hat above a neat neckerchief, striped and piping decorated shirt, fancy belts and holster. The Brunsbergs were dressed for working the front of the house, with Mr. Brunsberg in a three-piece suit and tie, carrying a white fedora, and Danny in a plaid sports jacket over a loose-necked white shirt. At the left background, in soft focus, two women and another man in western gear are seated. Stage lighting and equipment are visible at the top and right sides of the image. [IHM 2016.018.001]

1942

In 1942, a promotional image featuring Gene Autry is taken at the Issaquah Theatre. #Issaquah125

World War II ration book of stamps used to purchase certain items during the war. Was issued to Andrew L Wold by the Office of Price Administration. [IHM 88.010.001]

1941

In 1941, World War II starts, and many young men leave to join the armed forces. Issaquahns at home helped with the war effort through planting victory gardens, watching for enemy aircraft at the fire station, and selling war bonds. #Issaquah125

Although photographs from the mid 20th century seem to show the town of Issaquah as small and timeless, by the 1950s, change was already occurring. The Lake Washington Floating Bridge, the first bridge across the lake, opened in 1940. This new path dramatically shortened the time needed to get from Issaquah to Seattle. The opening of the bridge meant that more Issaquah residents could find employment in Seattle - and that more Seattle residents could move to the east side of Lake Washington and still commute to work. During the 1950s, Seattle's population dropped from 700,000 to 550,000 as a migration to the suburbs began. This program is a souvenir of the bridge's dedication ceremony, held July 2, 1940. [IHM 74.009.161]

1940

In 1940, the first floating bridge over Lake Washington is built, making it possible to travel quickly from Issaquah to Seattle. #Issaquah125

[72.021.014.096]

1939

In 1939, the State of Washington celebrates its Golden Jubilee. Issaquahns celebrated with the rest of the state. Pictured here in their Jubilee Hats are (left to right) Jacob Wilfong, Ray Schneider, Jacob Schomber, Dan Davies, Clint Brady, Walter Ek, G. B. Monce, and George Ek. #Issaquah125

[IHM 2009.014.002]

1938

In 1938, Ivor Morgan, the son of an Issaquah coal-miner, attends George Washington Medical school in Washington, DC. #Issaquah125

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1936

In 1936, the Town of Issaquah formally deeds City Park land over to the State Department of Fisheries, for the construction of a salmon hatchery. #Issaquah125

[IHM 2000.003.015]

1935

In 1935, Mona Jane Beers holds a third birthday party at the home of her grandparents, Edith and Charles Beers. #Issaquah125

Issaquah's Main Street in 1934 [IHM 2002.0041.31ab-2]

1934

In 1934 this property map is published, showing who owned property on Issaquah’s Main Street (which is today Andrews Street). #Issaquah125

Alpines-Design

1933

In 1933, the Issaquah Alpines win their first regional championship. They would go on to win another 7, setting a regional record. #Issaquah125

Donna Pedegana in her senior portrait, 1948.

1930

In 1930, following the crash of 1929, the nation is plunged into a Great Depression. Like others nationwide, Issaquah residents are impacted by the Depression in a variety of ways. #Issaquah125

Issaquah Kiwanis 75 Years

1929

In 1929, the Kiwanis Club of Issaquah is formed in 1929 – and continues to service the Issaquah community to this day. #Issaquah125

Issaquah Valley Dairy truck with driver [IHM 2011.035.001]

1928

In 1928, Henry Bergsma founds the Issaquah Valley Dairy, which delivered milk throughout the area until the dairy farm closed in 1962.. #Issaquah125

2002-20-1

1927

In 1927, this group of Issaquah High thespians poses for a picture. Stage make-up and costuming suggest that the play may have featured pirates or gypsies – or both. #Issaquah125

Caption

1926

The IHS Exhaust was a regular publication of Issaquah High School. This 1926 issue publicizes an upcoming concert, discusses school spirit, and reminds students of appropriate stairway safety, among other topics. #Issaquah125

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1925

By 1925, the Issaquah Depot is closed to passenger service, largely because automobiles are becoming more widespread. One stage, operated by Lorenzo Francis, has a regular stop in front of the Grand Central Hotel. #Issaquah125

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1924

In 1924, Andy Wold opens his hardware store in the Wold Building. The Wold Building still exists today, on the northeastern corner of Front & Sunset. #Issaquah125

Bill Evans

1923

In 1923, Bill Evans is born in Issaquah, WA. Bill lived most of his life in Issaquah, and he participated in a 2006 oral history project shortly before his death. Bill’s easygoing nature, flair for telling stories, and affection for his hometown are all evident in the interiew. #Issaquah125

From the December 31, 1922 Seattle Times.

1922

In 1922, Elsie Wendt, the wife of an Issaquah miner, makes the papers when she goes to the mines to learn her husband’s job. #Issaquah125

John Fischer Cash Market with a 1920s era truck. [IHM 72.021.014.031]

1921

In the early 1920s, John Fisher Cash Market, precursor to Fischer Meats, opens. #Issaquah125

Ben Legg

1920

In 1920, Ben Legg made a name for himself in the Seattle newspapers. Read about the real person behind “Bad Ben Legg.” #Issaquah125

Livestock in downtown Issaquah. [IHM 72-21-14-90b]

1919

In 1919, an ordinance is passed prohibiting cattle from running at large in the streets. Violators are subject to fines as high as $25. #Issaquah125

Jake Schomber and Minnie Wilson, circa 1917

1918

Minnie Wilson and her sweetheart, Jake Schomber, wrote to each other during the time he was in the army. This dramatic scene from their love story took place in 1918. . #Issaquah125

Alvo von Alvensleben

1917

In1917 Alvo von Albensleben, manager of the Issaquah & Superior Mine, is named as a suspected spy after the United States became involved in World War I. Albensleben and his family were interned for years beyond the end of World War I. #Issaquah125

Circa 1916 photo of Nikko family. [IHM 2001.022.001]

1916

In 1916, this photograph of the Nikko family is taken. The Nikkos are one of a number of Finnish immigrants who found their way to the Issaquah area to settle. #Issaquah125

86-18-244

1915

In 1915, George W. Tibbetts drafts the bill for a Snoqualmie Pass highway and pushes it through state legislature. #Issaquah125

April 141914 Seattle Times

1914

In1914, in an effort to convince county officials that the north end of Issaquah is in need of a drainage system, Issaquahns bring a great number of frogs to a meeting at the Town Hall to prove their point. #Issaquah125

Alvo von Alvensleben

1913

In 1913, Issaquah & Superior Coal Company begins operations under the management of the colorful German Alvo von Albensleben. #Issaquah125

Issaquah High School graduates, 1911. Left to right: Mary Gibson, Olive Gibson, and Mabel Ek.

1911

In1911, the first three graduates of Issaquah High School receive their diplomas; Issaquah’s newest high school is named after these three young women. #Issaquah125

Letter from John Neukirchen to Superintendent, Northern Pacific Railway Company. January 4, 1910.

1910

In1910, John Neukirchen seeks to have a rail spur built just south of town for use by the Neukirchen Brothers Mill. A collection of railroad documents chronicles the challenges both the Neukirchens and the Northern Pacific encounter in this seemingly simple request. #Issaquah125

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1909

In 1909, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens. This pass allows George Day to see the Exposition for up to seven days #Issaquah125

Paul Koss

1907

In 1907, Paul Koss is born to Austro-Hungarian immigrants. He lived in Issaquah for more than 99 years, and participated in a Memory Book project in 2000. #Issaquah125

The Drylie Family

1906

In 1906, John Drylie serves as Town Marshal. Issaquah’s marshalls didn’t receive much in the way of formal training, and were responsible for things like herding cattle out of the street and replacing light bulbs in the street lights. #Issaquah125

fic-2008-8

1905

In 1905, someone creates this wallet, which eventually finds its way into the collections of the Issaquah History Museums. Who was Ricardo? What do the B and C stand for? There are still many mysteries within our collections…. #Issaquah125

S[arah] A McPherson Wilson, November 4th 1822

1904

On this day in 1904, the wedding of Wilhilmena Stevens and John J. Eastlick is celebrated in Issaquah. Friends and relatives of the bride collaborate on this bridal quilt. #Issaquah125

Grand Central

1903

In 1903, James Croston finishes construction of his new hotel, the Grand Central. The Grand Central is the only one of Issaquah’s many early 20th Century hotel buildings to survive into the 21st Century. #Issaquah125

Alexander House in 1999

1902

In 1902, the Alexander House is constructed. The (relocated and expanded) building now serves as headquarters for the Chamber of Commerce. #Issaquah125

Dr. Hiram R. Corson came to Issaquah to work for the Issaquah Coal Company in the role of company doctor. He served as mayor for two terms from 1901 to 1905. [Image 72.021.014.176 ; Issaquah History Museums]

1901

In 1901, Hiram R. Corson is sworn in as Mayor of Issaquah. Dr. Corson served as the official mine physician for many years. #Issaquah125

Detail of The Issaquah Independent's eighth anniversary edition.

1900

In 1900, The Issaquah Independent newspaper begins publication. The Issaquah Independent later became the Issaquah Press, which closed its doors in February of 2017. #Issaquah125

72-21-14-35

1899

In 1899, the Snoqualmie Power Station is constructed on Mill Street to provide power to the town – which also changes its name from Gilman to Issaquah in this year. #Issaquah125

Home-Gilman

1898

In 1898, the town of Gilman purchases the Gilman Town Hall building from Ingebright Wold for use as the town’s seat of government. #Issaquah125

1897 letter from Walter Lorin Lane to Bertha Wold.

1897

In 1897 William Lane, of California, sends one in a series of letters to Bertha Wold. Lane courted Bertha by mail for years, but did not win her heart. #Issaquah125

86-18-242c

1896

In 1896, a team of oxen would skid a load of logs on the east side of Lake Sammamish. After unhooking the team from log, the men would use peavies to roll the log down the skids and into the lake for rafting to the mill. #Issaquah125

William Wold

1894

In 1894, William Wold of Eastern Washington senda one in a long series of correspondence to his sister Bertha, in what was then Gilman, WA. #Issaquah125

2003-2-1

1893

In 1893, the earliest known image of the Pickering Barn is taken, featuring members of the Reard and Geise families, who worked on the Pickering Farm for a time. #Issaquah125

Gilman's Depot, circa 1892

1892

The residents of the rapidly-growing Squak Valley settlement vote to incorporate their settlement as the town of Gilman, named after railroad founder Daniel Hunt Gilman. #Issaquah125


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power-of-words-by-antonio-litterio-creative-commons-attribution-share-alike-3-0

Making History: 1980s & 1990s

Have you thought about writing a memoir? This series of weekly workshops is for you! Author and ghostwriter Kim Pearson will teach a comprehensive, easy to use, and fun method of exploring the times of your life against a backdrop of historical events.

Valentine send to Mrs. August Berg in 1917.

Valentine Play Date & Trolley Time

Celebrate St. Valentine’s Day with the Issaquah History Museums inside the Depot! Kids of all ages can admire Valentines from the Museums’ collection, talk about how we show others that we care about them, and make their own Valentine. The Issaquah Valley Trolley will also be running from 11 AM until 3 PM, so you can snuggle up with your sweetie for a ride on the rails.

IHM 2004-11-27

The Squak Valley Hot Shots

The Squak Valley Hot Shots were an Issaquah-based all-women’s folk band who entertained throughout the Pacific Northwest. The group originally grew out of Issaquah’s Eagles Club. Although the membership changed over the years, the group played together from 1957 to 1980. Artifacts relating the Hot Shots recently entered the IHM collections.

Issaquah 125th Logo

Quasquicentennial: Issaquah’s 125th

We are in the midst of a year-long celebration of Issaquah’s quasquicentennial – or 125th birthday! For each year since incorporation, we are sharing a photograph, artifact, oral history, article, or other history-related goody.

Alexander House in 1999

Buildings and Sites

This month we are spotlighting Issaquah’s historic buildings and sites! Many historic buildings still remain in Issaquah, along with some significant new buildings. Both old and new structures add character. Click here to peruse a wealth of information and pictures of many of Issaquah’s special buildings and places.

Events

power-of-words-by-antonio-litterio-creative-commons-attribution-share-alike-3-0

Making History: 1980s & 1990s

Have you thought about writing a memoir? This series of weekly workshops is for you! Author and ghostwriter Kim Pearson will teach a comprehensive, easy to use, and fun method of exploring the times of your life against a backdrop of historical events.

Valentine send to Mrs. August Berg in 1917.

Valentine Play Date & Trolley Time

Celebrate St. Valentine’s Day with the Issaquah History Museums inside the Depot! Kids of all ages can admire Valentines from the Museums’ collection, talk about how we show others that we care about them, and make their own Valentine. The Issaquah Valley Trolley will also be running from 11 AM until 3 PM, so you can snuggle up with your sweetie for a ride on the rails.

Pages

power-of-words-by-antonio-litterio-creative-commons-attribution-share-alike-3-0

Making History: 1980s & 1990s

Have you thought about writing a memoir? This series of weekly workshops is for you! Author and ghostwriter Kim Pearson will teach a comprehensive, easy to use, and fun method of exploring the times of your life against a backdrop of historical events.

Valentine send to Mrs. August Berg in 1917.

Valentine Play Date & Trolley Time

Celebrate St. Valentine’s Day with the Issaquah History Museums inside the Depot! Kids of all ages can admire Valentines from the Museums’ collection, talk about how we show others that we care about them, and make their own Valentine. The Issaquah Valley Trolley will also be running from 11 AM until 3 PM, so you can snuggle up with your sweetie for a ride on the rails.

IHM 2004-11-27

The Squak Valley Hot Shots

The Squak Valley Hot Shots were an Issaquah-based all-women’s folk band who entertained throughout the Pacific Northwest. The group originally grew out of Issaquah’s Eagles Club. Although the membership changed over the years, the group played together from 1957 to 1980. Artifacts relating the Hot Shots recently entered the IHM collections.

Issaquah 125th Logo

Quasquicentennial: Issaquah’s 125th

We are in the midst of a year-long celebration of Issaquah’s quasquicentennial – or 125th birthday! For each year since incorporation, we are sharing a photograph, artifact, oral history, article, or other history-related goody.

Alexander House in 1999

Buildings and Sites

This month we are spotlighting Issaquah’s historic buildings and sites! Many historic buildings still remain in Issaquah, along with some significant new buildings. Both old and new structures add character. Click here to peruse a wealth of information and pictures of many of Issaquah’s special buildings and places.