Vern Anderson

Vern “Babe” Anderson

Vern Anderson

Vernon “Babe” Anderson, ca 1945

Vernon “Babe” Anderson was born in 1927 in Renton, WA to Albert A. Anderson and Ruth Johns Anderson. Babe was interviewed in 2008 by Maria McLeod as part of IHM’s oral history project. His extensive oral history covers his grandparent’s immigration to the United States and Issaquah, through his life growing up and remaining in Issaquah. Subjects covered include working at Issaquah Creamery, being drafted for both WWII and the Korean War, and his father’s various building projects including two houses that still remain as part of Gilman Village. The City of Issaquah acquired Vernon’s family’s land and buildings for part of the Confluence Park Project. Vernon requested recognition of his grandfather, Tolle Anderson, in the park project.

Peter Vroom Davis

January 10, 1893–January 8, 1895

Peter Vroom Davis was born in New Jersey, to parents William Smith Davis and Phebe A. Morton. Although William Smith Davis was a farmer, he was descended from an old New Jersey family that included Peter D. Vroom, fifth governor of New Jersey. P.V. Davis had a long career as an attorney in Washington State. Davis moved to Issaquah with his first wife, Willmena, and was living there as of 1892 when the territorial census was taken. In addition to his wife, his brother Augustus W. Davis, and son Walter, age 3, were living with him. Davis became the major of Gilman at the tender age of 25 and served until 1895. His must have been divorced or widowed between 1892 and 1896, because he married Nettie Doxy of Issaquah in December 1896. Nettie’s father John served on the Town Council. By 1900 the couple was living in Seattle, where they remained until at least 1931. Peter Vroom Davis died in California in 1948.

Vern Anderson

Oral Histories

Oral Histories


In 2006, we launched a project to record and transcribe oral histories with more than twenty-five community members. At the end of the project, after staff members had an opportunity to review the transcripts, we realized the value of the information we’d gathered. We’re thrilled to begin sharing the contents of our oral history collection! There is a wealth of interesting stories and memories within the oral history collection  – each oral history transcript contains dozens of pages of memories about a variety of people and topics.


Pen and ink

Memory Book Project

This month our Memory Books are in the spotlight! During the year 2001, the Issaquah Historical Society collected memories from a number of long-time Issaquah residents, which we have gathered her for you peruse in their entirety.