7 Native Plant Uses


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.2: Understands human interaction with the environment.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students discover how Native Americans used plants in the Issaquah area to meet their basic needs, and compare that with how these basic needs are met today.

Materials: laminated plant Illustrations, plant identification cards, overhead of correct matches, worksheet on plant uses

Note to Teacher: Students should be reminded that they should never try eating or using a plant for medicinal purposes unless they have an adult with them who knows for certain the plants are safe. Remind students that some plants are poisonous, and sometimes poisonous plants can look almost identical to edible plants. In addition, some plants are safe to eat or use only when prepared in a specific way.

Procedure:

  1. Native Americans met all of their basic needs with the natural materials around them; trees, plants, animals, etc. Explain to students that they will be examining plants and finding what the Native Americans used them for.
  2. Half of the class receives a laminated plant illustration. The other half of the class receives a plant identification card. This card gives a short description of the plant and a description of how the Native Americans used the plant.
  3. Students try to find their match. They need to read the description and study the plants to see if they have a match. Then, they can read how the Native Americans used the plant.
  4. Put the matching answer key up on the Power Point when students have had enough time to find a reasonable match. Some plants are similar in appearance. Some students may need the answer key to find their correct match.
  5. Once students have matched the plant illustration to the plant identification card, students can share with the group the name of their plant and the Native American uses.
  6. Discuss how we meet the same basic needs today. For example, Native Americans used cedar to carve bowls and spoons. Today we buy plastic or metal utensils at the store.
  7. Students use the worksheets to draw a picture of their plant, copy the Native American uses from the card, and draw a picture of how we meet the same basic needs today.
  8. Based on time and student interest, teachers may want students to complete the one worksheet that has “their” plant along with two others, or any number of additional worksheets. There are a total of 15 plants (5 worksheets, 3 plants on each worksheet).

Downloads:

Activity 7 (DOC)
Activity 7 (PDF)
Plant Illustrations
Plant ID Card
List of Correct Matches
Plant Uses

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8 Native American Stories


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.2: Understands human interaction with the environment.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students listen to several Native American stories about how something in nature came to be.  Then they write their own story about how something in nature came to be.

Materials: stories included in the activity, paper, pencil, crayons or pens to illustrate, laminated blackberry vine

Procedure:

  1. Read one of the Native American stories attached.
  2. Discuss how the Native Americans often used stories to explain how something in nature came to be. Discuss what in natural characteristics are explained in the story just read.
  3. Read another story to the students. Direct them, “While you listen to this story, see if you can tell what the story is explaining in nature.”
  4. Students write their own story that explains how something came to be in nature. Brainstorm ideas such as: how mountains got to be so big, how the sun and moon got into the sky, why the beaver’s tail is flat, why bears have sharp claws, how the turtle got its shell, what causes it to rain, why frogs jump, why bald eagles have white heads, why porcupines have quills, etc.
  5. Students can illustrate their stories and then share the stories with the class.

Extension:

The Native American name for Squak Mountain was tukaiyu-a’ltu which means “Wolf’s house,” and the name for Tiger Mountain was ts’oop-a’ltu, ts’oop meaning “swamp.” Using this information, let students come up with their own stories about the two mountains.

Downloads:

Activity 8 (DOC)
Activity 8 (PDF)
Native Stories (PDF)

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9 Map of Native American Villages and Trails


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography, Social Studies Skills

Geography 3.2.1: Understands how the environment affects cultural groups and how cultural groups affect the environment.

Geography 3.2.2: Understands the cultural universals of place, time, family life, economics, communication, arts, recreation, food, clothing, shelter, transportation, government, and education

Social Studies Skills 5.3.1: Engages in discussions that attempt to answer questions about cultural similarities and differences.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students learn about the places that Native Americans lived, traveled, and conducted their daily lives in the Issaquah and Lake Sammamish area.  Students consider solutions to the problems that the Native Americans had to face.  Students also consider how natural landforms, lakes, hills, forests, wetlands, etc. influence Native American settlement and travel.

Materials: teacher copy of the map, six blank maps of new areas

Procedure:

  1. Explain to the students that they are going to try to find solutions to problems that the Native Americans had to face. Present each of the following questions to the class and allow time for them to think about solutions, share in small groups, and share with the entire class their solutions. *Questions and the Native American’s solutions are listed below.
  2. Share the Native Americans’ solutions to each of the problems and compare their solutions to the students’ suggestions. Did the students come up with any of the same solutions?
  3. As you explain the Native Americans’ solutions, point out the villages, trails, and points of interest on the projected map.
  4. After you have shared the Native Americans’ solutions to all of the problems presented, tell the students that they are going to have a chance to create their own map. Tell the students to imagine that they are in a new area and looking for a place to build their houses, hunt and gather food, provide clothing, find ways to travel, and meet all of their basic needs. Where would they build their houses and make their trails? It is important that they know that there is not one right answer, but they may want to consider the reasons why the Native Americans set up their area as they did.
  5. In groups of four, students draw on a map; villages, trails, various points of interest, etc. using the key as a guide.
  6. Students share their final maps with the class and explain why they chose to place each village or trail where they did.

Questions and Native American Solutions:
Where would you build your long houses?
Near the lake because it provides easy access to fishing and hunting –animals come to the lake and streams for fresh water. It is also an open area and safer than the thick woods. Predators like bears and cougars are less likely to attack in an open area. The waterfront also provides easy access to the lake for travel by canoe.

Where would you make your trails?
Native Americans made their footpaths near the lake because the land is flat and easy to traverse. The lake also provides a reference point. It is much easier to get lost in thick woods than if you are traveling around a lake.

Where are the best food supplies?
Native Americans knew when and where to gather food, such as water chestnuts and hazelnuts.

Downloads:

Activity 9 (DOC)
Activity 9 (PDF)
Teacher’s Key & Area Maps

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10 Mary Louie


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.


 

Objective: Students compare historical information, the age of Native American Mary Louie, and think about why interpretations of her age differ from source to source.

Materials: Three attached articles (” On the shores of Lake Sammamish, Aunt Louie lived, found in This Was Issaquah, page 47; “The People of the Moon,” found in A Hidden Past, page 2; “Mary Louie 1798-1917,” found in Eastside Heritage News), pictures of Mary Louie

Procedure:

  1. Pose the question, “Should we believe everything we read?” “How do we know that what we read or hear is true?” Discuss how newspapers, books and articles are usually reliable resources, but readers should always be careful not to believe something just because it is written down. It is important to find out who has written the information, what that person’s background is (do they know a lot about the subject, do they have biases), and what their purpose was for sharing the information.
  2. Sometimes, even people who are trying to provide reliable information cannot get all of the facts, or they might get what they think are facts but these facts vary. Here is an example of three articles that tried to provide correct information. Read the portions of the articles about Mary Louie that discuss how old she lived to be. (She is reported to have lived to be 115, 120, and 119 years old.) Show the pictures of Mary Louie. Ask students why they think there is a difference between how old the authors thought Mary Louie lived to be. (Maybe they interviewed two different people who each believed something different. Maybe no one actually knew how old she was. In the past, Native Americans did not write down their histories, or write birth certificates, so this information is difficult to find. Mary Louie has passed away so the writers of the articles couldn’t ask her.)
  3. Pose the following questions to the class, “Imagine you are a reporter. If you were asked to write a follow-up article attempting to clarify how old Mary Louie was, where would you start? Who would want to interview? What other resources could you use to find out?”

Downloads:

Activity 10 (DOC)
Activity 10 (PDF)
Supplemental Reading
Mary Louie, Picture A and Picture B.

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