21 Timelines


Competencies: Social Studies, History

Social Studies Skills 5.2.2: Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from visuals and literary, narrative, informational, and expository texts.CBA: Cultural Contributions


 

Objective: Students create a timeline of local history highlighting events and historical eras by placing information in chronological order.

Materials: laminated timeline and timeline cards

Note to teacher:

There are three groups of people mentioned in this timeline; Native Americans, a group of people from China, and Japanese families.  Unfortunately, Issaquah has not always been a place where diversity was appreciated or even tolerated.  Rather than skipping over the unpleasant parts of history in an attempt to protect children, all major events have been included because it can be just as detrimental to ignore such history.  It is up the educator to present the complete history to children in a sensitive, tolerant manner.  Please encourage students to see how unfortunate some attitudes and events have been in the past.  Also encourage students to see how people can learn from their mistakes in the past, and how they can be part of creating a brighter and better future for everyone.

Procedure:

  1. Discuss what a timeline is.  As an introduction to timelines, each child can make a simple timeline of his or her own life.  On a small strip of paper, students can mark off each year of their life with a date and a small drawing illustrating an important event that happened that year, such as 1999 lost my first tooth, 2000 my brother was born, 2001 started school, 2002 trip to Disneyland, 2003 moved to Washington State.
  2. Share the timeline of Issaquah history without any of the information cards attached.  Discuss the dates on the timeline.  How do they compare to the dates on the students’ life timelines (covers more time, goes much farther back in history).
  3. Pass out the information cards to small groups or partners.  There are 30 cards in all.  Teachers may want to pass out and discuss five cards a day for six days, or ten cards a day for three days, to spread out the information.
  4. Students read, discuss and share the information on their cards.  As an optional activity, students can also illustrate the event on their card, look for photos in the kit that might show the event, or look for objects in the kit that coincide with their event.  (Not all events will have matching photos or artifacts.)
  5. Students discuss which cards go with which dates.
  6. Students attach their cards to the timeline in chronological order.
  7. Discuss the changes that have occurred in the Issaquah area.
  8. Examine the causes and effects that people and events had on the area.

Downloads:

Activity 21 (DOC)
Activity 21 (PDF)
Timeline
Timeline cards

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22 Murals


Competencies: Social Studies, History

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.

Social Studies Skills 5.2.2: Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from visuals and literary, narrative, informational, and expository texts.

Social Studies Skills 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

CBA: Cultural Contributions


 

Objective: Students watch the PowerPoint slides about the Bill Haddon mural, and are introduced to various perspectives and historical biases.  Students make their own mural of Issaquah history, each student contributing a portion.

Materials: Bill Haddon mural pictures or Bill Haddon power point, pamphlet explaining the mural, large butcher paper, crayons, pens or other coloring materials

Note to teacher:

There are many biases shown in the mural. This lesson provides an opportunity to teach how those who record history have an affect on how people and events are portrayed in history.  It is an excellent opportunity to point out biases.

Procedure:

  1. Show the Bill Haddon Mural Power Point images, discussing what is shown in each section of the mural.
  2. Explain that this mural is how one person saw Issaquah’s history.
  3. Using the pictures of the mural, discuss which people and which events this artist chose to represent Issaquah’s history.  Pose the question, “What people or events would you choose if you were to illustrate the history of Issaquah?”
  4. Discuss what a bias is, and how biases can affect the history that is recorded.  Point out the following biases in the mural:
    • There are far more men represented.
    • Specific people represented tend to be wealthy businessmen.  The large portrait of the Native American, lumberjack and miner are “typical” samples.
    • The Casto incident (sometimes referred to as a “massacre”) shows Native Americans that are probably inaccurate.  The Native Americans in this area did not wear loincloths.  By this time in Issaquah history they were probably in western dress, and they were probably not carrying torches.  A total of three white people died and two Native Americans.  The Native Americans that killed the Castos were actually employed by Mr. Casto.
    • The illustration of the Chinese men being shot is labeled as the “Chinese Riot” or “Chinese Massacre.”  The Chinese people were not rioting or massacring anyone.  The white settlers were the ones running the Chinese people out of town.  This was actually an anti-Chinese incident.  There were four Chinese people that died.  Again, the clothing/hairstyle depiction is probably not accurate.
    • Use these inaccuracies to point out the importance of careful research, attention to detail, and consideration of all perspectives when portraying history.
  5. Inform the class that they will be given an opportunity to create their own mural, depicting what they view as the most important people and events in Issaquah’s history.
  6. Review the timeline and photos in the history kit.  Feel free to expand beyond these resources for ideas.
  7. On the board, list the people and events they wish to illustrate in their mural.
  8. In small groups, students illustrate a portion of the mural.
  9. Display the final product in the hallways, library or cafeteria

Downloads:

Activity 22 (DOC)
Activity 22 (PDF)
Bill Haddon PowerPoint

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23 Memories


Competencies: Social Studies, History

History 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

History 4.2.2: Understands how contributions made by various cultural groups have shaped the history of the community and world.


 

Objective: Students read or listen to memories from the book, Preserving the Stories of Issaquah.  Then they write their own memories.  An extension is to do an oral history with a parent or grandparent.

Materials: book Preserving the Stories of Issaquah, paper, pencil, interview questions (see attached), WWII Watchtower Log

Procedure:

Part 1

  1. Discuss how journals, diaries, stories (oral or written), newspapers, and letters can tell us information about the past.
  2. Read any combination of any of the following short passages from the book, Preserving the Stories of Issaquah.  *See attached page for recommended passages.  Most of these passages are only one or two paragraphs long.  Teachers may want to divide up the readings into several different days by reading one category of stories per day.  This is a wonderful opportunity to give students some exposure to a wide range of Issaquah history including the depression and World War II.  When reading the selections about WWII, share the laminated watchtower log.  This is a recording of citizens that watched for Japanese planes from a watchtower during WWII.
  3. Ask students, “What can we learn about the history of Issaquah from these stories?”
  4. Tell students to think of a memorable experience that they have had.  This could be the first time they tried something new, the first time they traveled somewhere new, the funniest thing that ever happened to them, the happiest day they have ever had, a special holiday or celebration that they remember, etc.  Remind students that it can be about an event, a place, a person that is special to them, or simply what they enjoy doing in their free time.
  5. Students write their own memory.  They can illustrate and create a class book about modern memories.  If the class does The Modern Time-Capsule Trunk activity, they can add their book to the trunk.

Part 2

  1. To learn more about the past, as a homework assignment, have students interview a family member or friend (preferably an older person whose experiences go back more than 30 years). Ask students, “What do you think we can learn by asking people questions and listening to the stories they have to tell?”  Explain that they will share their interview results at a later date.
  2. Use the interview form to gather information from a family member or friend.  Students can share their interview results with the class.
  3. After students have had an opportunity to share either their own memories or a family member’s memories, help the students identify what is a primary and secondary source.
  4.  Discuss how even two primary sources might vary in description.   Ask, “Has anyone ever shared the same experience with someone else but you each remember how it happened a little differently?”  Discuss how different people might choose to stress different elements of a story.  For example, a child might recall the excitement of fireworks on a Fourth of July celebration, while their parents might recall preparing the picnic and visiting with relatives.  Discuss how what gets recorded as history is often what was important or memorable to the individual that is recording the event

Downloads:

Activity 23 (DOC)
Activity 23 (PDF)
Preserving the Stories: Selected Readings (PDF)
Interview Questions
Spotter’s Log pages

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24 Technology Causes and Effects


Competencies: Social Studies, History

Geography 3.2: Understands human interaction with the environment.

CBA: Humans and the Environment.


 

Objective: Students examine technological advancements in transportation.  Using a population graph, they see the impact that this technology has had on Issaquah, and discover how this has affected people, resources, and cultures.

Materials: mounted photos of forms of transportation (see Photo Prompts slide show, transportation section), population graph and Velcro event stickers, two articles for teacher information; “History of Transportation In This Area” and “Early Transportation Via Trail and Waters” (see attached)

Procedure:

  1. Discuss how students get to and from school each day (walk, ride in cars, take the school bus, older students might ride bikes to school).
  2. Make a graph that shows how many students walk, ride in a car, or take the bus to school.  This can be a pictograph that uses pictures of cars, shoes, or buses to represent each student and their mode of transportation to and from school.
  3. Ask students how they think people traveled before they had cars.
  4. Optional: show the slides called “Transportation,” marked blue on the top of the slides.
  5. Share the photos of forms of transportation used in Issaquah’s past.  There is a recommended list attached.
  6. Discuss what life was like in Issaquah when people had to walk or ride horses, wagons or boats to travel; how life changed when the railroad came to town; when people began to drive cars; when the floating bridge was built; and when I-90 was constructed.
  7. Share the population graph without the three events attached.  Discuss the dates and what forms of transportation were available at these times.  Let students guess what they think caused the population to rise at each of the three Velcro dates.
  8. Let students place the Velcro stickers on the graph.  It should become rapidly apparent that many people moved to Issaquah when the floating bridge was built, when I-90 opened, and when Microsoft and major development occurred.
  9. Discuss how technical advances in transportation have affected the people, resources, and culture of Issaquah.

Background Information:

See also the attached articles.

When the Native Americans were here, and the first settlers arrived, there were only footpaths and trails around the lake.  Native Americans used canoes on the lake.  Soon after the first white settlers came, they traveled on the lake on a boat named The Squak. Trips to other towns or Seattle, were probably not frequent and took much time and effort.  Before the railroad came to town, people in Issaquah relied on natural resources and their surroundings to meet their basic needs.  When the railroad came to town, supplies of all kinds could be transported to and from Issaquah much faster and much easier.  People had access to a wider variety of supplies, and could send their dairy products, farm products, and coal to Seattle, businesses could develop and grow.  When the automobile became affordable, people could drive around the lake, getting to and from Issaquah faster.  They had greater personal freedom to travel.  Families and individuals could travel farther distances for recreational and social purposes, as well as for work.  Eventually, when the floating bridge and I-90 were built, many, many people could travel to and from Issaquah.  As a result, the population in Issaquah boomed.

Downloads:

Activity 24 (DOC)
Activity 24 (PDF)
Population Graph
Population Labels
Transportation Background Articles

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25 Comparing Information


Competencies: Social Studies, History

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.


 

Objective: Students read two articles about the same place or event and compare how each author chose to portray the event.  Students discover how different information can be gathered when using more than one resource to learn about history.

Materials: books: The Past at PresentThis Was Issaquah and Preserving the Stories of Issaquah, board, large sheet of paper, or overhead to write on

Procedure:

Part 1:

  1. Show the picture of the bridge on page 24 of The Past at Present and the same picture of the bridge on page 60 of This Was Issaquah.  Ask students if they think the articles next to each photo will be the same since they both use the same photo.
  2. Read the titles of the articles that accompany these photos.  Let students predict which each article will be about.
  3. Make a two-column table or a Venn diagram on the board.  Label one column or circle “City Park” and the other “Bridges and People Come and Go.”  Read the captions under the photos.  List the main ideas from each of the captions in the appropriate column or section on the board.
  4. Compare the information.  What is the same information given in both captions and what is different information?
  5. Allow students to revise their predictions as to what each article is about.
  6. Read the first paragraph of each article to the class.  Continue to fill in the table or Venn diagram with main ideas, and then compare the information.

Part 2:

  1. Compare two articles about the same event, the Monohan fire.  Read the article on page 100 of This was Issaquah, “The day Monohan burnedto the class.
  2. Then read the article on page 38 of Preserving the Stories of Issaquah, “Sawmills” by Eric Erickson.
  3. Make a two-column chart or Venn diagram, and write the main ideas of each article in the appropriate places. Compare the information that is the same and different.
  4. Discuss how reading more than one article, or using more than one source can provide new or additional information about an event in history.

Downloads:

Activity 25 (DOC)
Activity 25 (PDF)

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26 Celebrations and Pastimes


Competencies: Social Studies, Civics

Civics 1.1.1: Understands the key ideals of unity and diversity.

Civics 1.1.2: Understands and applies the key ideals of unity and diversity within the context of the community.

CBA: Meeting Needs and Wants.


 

Objective: Students compare the various celebrations and pastimes Issaquah has honored over the years.

Materials: mounted photos that depict various pastimes and celebrations (see recommended list attached), laminated business card and booking sheet for Alexander’s beach, optional slide show titled “Play” (colored yellow on top of the slides)

Procedure:

  1. Discuss what students like to do for fun.  What holidays do they celebrate? What traditions do they have?  Once students have brainstormed a wide variety of celebrations, record on the board those celebrations that are shared with their local community, such as Salmon Days, Fourth of July fireworks, neighborhood Christmas lights, etc.
  2. Optional: Watch the slide show of “Play.”  These slides are marked yellow marker on the top of the slides.
  3. Share the mounted photos of Issaquah pastimes and celebrations.  Ask students if they have experienced any of these activities here in Issaquah or elsewhere.  Ask students which of these activities they would like to have attended, and which activities they wish were still a part of Issaquah’s current celebrations.
  4. Discuss how the “most important,” or “best attended” celebrations have changed over the years.  Discuss why the focus has changed (see background notes below).
  5. Pass the laminated cards for Alexander’s Beach around the class.  Let students guess what these artifacts can tell us about what people in Issaquah use to do for entertainment.  Do students do any of the same activities today on Lake Sammamish (picnic, swim, boat launch, camping)?
  6. Have students draw a picture of their favorite Issaquah pastime or celebration.  Students can make a collage of their pictures and put them on display.

Background: Celebrations

Issaquah has celebrated three major events in the past; the Fourth of July, Labor Day, and Salmon Days.   In the 1920’s and possibly earlier, rodeos were held on both Labor Day and on the Fourth of July.  The rodeos hosted events such as calf roping and bucking broncos, chariot races, relays, and dances.   There were also holiday horse races down the middle of Front Street, between the Grange Mercantile building and Mill Street (now Sunset Way).  In the 1930’s Labor Day was the biggest community celebration.  This lasted until the late 1960’s (although not during World War II).  Eventually, the organizers lost their enthusiasm and energy to host such grand events on Labor Day.

In 1970, the Salmon Days Festival began.  This celebration was created to celebrate community spirit, bring attention, people, and interest to Issaquah, and raise funds for the Chamber of Commerce.  People were already coming to Issaquah Creek to watch the return of the salmon, so the event was timed with the annual salmon spawning.  In 1970, there were 75 booths and 2,500 visitors. By 1999 the Salmon Days Festival had 420 booths and an estimated 250,000 visitors.

Alexander’s Beach Resort was located on the banks of Lake Sammamish, across from today’s 43rd Street (near where Providence Point is located). Thomas was the “walking boss” for the railroad.  He traveled where the rail was being laid and supervised the construction. Caroline ran a boarding house in Issaquah.  In 1902, they purchased 160 acres and built their house on the banks of Lake Sammamish.  The family ran a resort from 1917 to the 1980’s.  The home was moved by the historical society into Issaquah for use as a Visitor’s Center in the early 1980’s. Many Issaquah residents have fond memories of summers spent at Alexander’s Beach resort.

Extensions:

Read memories about celebrations and pastimes from Preserving the Stories of Issaquah.

Community Celebrations, pages 30-32
Outdoor Recreation, pages 33-35

Downloads:

Activity 26 (DOC)
Activity 26 (PDF)

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