4 What do your students know?


Competencies: Social Studies, History, Social Studies Skills

History 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

Social Studies Skills 5.2.2: Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from visuals and literary, narrative, informational, and expository texts.


 

Objective: Students have an opportunity to share what they already know about the history of their local community, and then brainstorm what they would like to find out about the history of their community.

Materials: vocabulary list, mounted photos of the early Issaquah area

Procedure:

  1. Review with students in an informal discussion what they already know about the history of the area.
  2. The vocabulary list could be used as a springboard for discussion.
  3. Another option is to hold up some of the mounted photos and play an inquiry game, letting students share what they notice in the photos.
  4. Keep a K.W.L. chart, recording in three columns what children “Know,” “Want to know,” and at the end of the unit, what students have “Learned.”

Extensions:

  1. To continue practice with the vocabulary words, use the words as a spelling list one week or have students try to unscramble the words.
  2. On the board, list all of the ways in which students have learned about the history of their community (parents, museums, newspapers, photos, etc.).

Downloads:

Activity 4 (DOC)
Activity 4 (PDF)
Vocabulary List
Photographs (PPT) 

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5 Be a History Mystery Detective


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

CBA: Meeting Needs and Wants


 

Objective: Students brainstorm all of the resources we have to learn about the past: photos, letters, journals, memoirs, newspapers, interviews, people, official records, artifacts, objects, etc.  They discover how we learn about the past, specifically through asking questions and thinking about clues in artifacts.

Materials: buttonhook and pair of child’s shoes, wool cards or lucet with yarn, butter press, Edison record, shaving brush, pair of stocking shapers/stretchers/dryers (in Kit 1 only), and old newspaper

Procedure:

  1. Brainstorm all of the resources we have to learn about the past (photos, buildings, structures, letters, journals, memoirs, interviews, people, official records, artifacts, objects, etc.).
  2. Use an inquiry approach to identify a set of artifacts in the kit. Hold up each item and ask students to answer the following questions:
    • What materials is it made from?
    • Where do you think it came from?
    • How was it made?
    • How was it used?
    • Do we still use this? If so, how has it changed? If not, what do we use in place of this?
  3. Discuss how we know life was different and in what ways it was the same, based on these artifacts.

Extensions:

  1. Discuss what objects we use now that in 100 years might be considered antiques or artifacts.
  2. Discuss how photos have changed over the years. Why are some historic photos black and white? Today we can choose to have our photos printed or stored on computer disks.
  3. Can students think of any other clues around their neighborhood that tell about the past (old buildings, old street names, murals on walls that depict scenes from the past, old train or lumber machinery, etc.)?
  4. For the kits containing the lucet (numbers 1, 3, and 5) instead of the wool cards, students can learn how to make sturdy braided cords using this simple wooden tool. Background, pictures, and directions are attached to this activity in those kits.

Downloads:

Activity 5 (DOC)
Activity 5 (PDF)
Lucets
Issaquah Press (selected back issues, 1909-2011)

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6 Photo Study


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.


 

Objective: Using a photo that depicts life in the past in Issaquah, students learn facts about Issaquah’s history.  Then, they use their imagination to write their own story about what is happening in the photos.

Materials: mounted photos in the kit, set of five laminated photos with information printed on the back (or Photo Prompts Slide show)

Procedure:

  1. Share one of the historical, laminated photos with the entire class. Discuss the photo by asking questions such as:
    • Who or what is in the photo?
    • What is in the background?
    • What do you think the people are doing?
    • When do you think the photo was taken? Why?
    • What objects are in the photo?
    • How does the photo look different from photos taken now?
    • Do the people look happy? Sad? Tired? Excited? Relaxed?
    • If you could be one of the people in the photo, who would you like to be and why?
  2. Look for details in the photo. What do students notice after looking at the photo more carefully?
  3. Use the information on the back of the photo to discuss the actual answers to many of the questions above. Explain that one way to learn more about history is to study photos that were taken in the past. Explain that there are many clues in photos that show us how people lived in the past.
  4. Share several of the other laminated photos with the class, ask questions, and talk about we know about the photo and what we don’t know.
  5. Discuss how we could learn more about the people and places in the photos:
    • Talk to someone who knew the people in the photo, or who were related to them.
    • Read one of the person’s letters, journals, or diaries if they kept one.
    • Learn about the professions that these people had.
    • Research the history of the places or buildings in the photo.
  6. In small groups, students choose one of the laminated or mounted photos and use their imagination to write a make-believe story about the people in the photo. 7. Students share their stories with the class. Discuss the difference between facts that we know from the photo and imagined things the students made up for their story.

Extensions:

  1. Write a class story about one of the photos, each student adding on one sentence at a time.
  2. Research one of the photos to learn more about it.
  3. Discuss how history could be misinterpreted if we only made guesses based on a photo. Often additional research is required to learn facts about history.

Downloads:

Activity 6 (DOC)
Activity 6 (PDF)
Photo Prompts (PPT)

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