1 Locating Issaquah


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.1: Understands the physical characteristics, cultural characteristics, and location of places, regions, and spatial patterns on the Earth’s surface.

Geography 3.1.1: Understands and applies how maps and globes are used to display the regions of North America in the past and present.


 

Objective: Students determine where we live on maps of the world, United States of America, Washington State, and Seattle and the greater Eastside. They find Issaquah on the maps of Washington State and  Seattle.

Materials: maps of the world, the United States of America, Washington, and Seattle. Globe.

Procedure:

  1. Guide the class in defining geography. As a class, identify the approximate location of Issaquah on each of the four maps. Specifically, find Issaquah on the maps of Washington State and Seattle.
  2. Discuss features of a map; compass rose, key, water, land, cities, boarders, rivers, etc.
  3. Using the map of the world, locate the poles, continents, oceans, equator, and hemispheres. Use Velcro cards to label these.

Extensions:

  • Discuss the similarities and differences between each of the maps. Students take turns finding specific locations on each of the maps.
  • Students attach the world map Velcro labels as an activity center. Have a specific place for each label that is not attached, as they are small and easy to lose.
  • Use a classroom globe to locate the poles, continents, oceans, Washington State, and Issaquah. Compare the flat maps to a three dimensional globe. Does the globe show any locations better than the flat maps (i.e. poles)?

Downloads:

Activity 1 (DOC)
Activity 1 (PDF)
world map labels

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2 Issaquah Maps


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.1: Understands the physical characteristics, cultural characteristics, and location of places, regions, and spatial patterns on the Earth’s surface.


 

Objective: Students name all of the things a community has such as post office, library, school, park, museum, etc and create a map of their own community.  They become familiar with a map of Issaquah, map symbols and features.  Students create their own map of where they live and play.

Materials:

  • Large paper (construction or butcher), pencils, pens, or crayons, basic map of Issaquah as a guide
  • Optional 3-D version: recycled boxes, empty containers, cans, etc., glue or tape
  • Teacher resource: article on Turf Maps if interested (it is not necessary to read this in order to do the activity with your class)

Procedure:

  1. As a class, discuss locations that can be found in communities, “All communities have…”
  2. Examine the map of the community of Issaquah.
  3. Find the location of your school on the map.
  4. Help students locate approximately where they live on the map. Discuss symbols on the map.
  5. Students make a Turf Map. Students draw their own map of the area where they live, play, hang out, and travel.
  6. Students may want to show areas that a special, disliked, paths that they frequently travel, barriers, etc. The map does not need to be exact in scale, direction or size.
  7. Discuss features that they might want to include such as their home, school, grocery store, park, library, museum, or beach.
  8. Model how to use symbols and make a key or legend.

Extensions:

  • The group can combine neighborhood maps and make one large map of Issaquah on butcher paper.
  • Using the map of Issaquah, draw a large outline of the city on butcher paper. The teacher/leader will need to draw simple regional landmarks first to give participants a reference point. For example, the teacher/leader may draw the Lake Sammamish shoreline, their own school, I-90, Gilman Village, Costco, Cougar Mt., Squak Mt. etc. Once a basic outline of the city is laid out, the group can locate familiar roads and landmarks. This can become a three dimensional (3-D) map if the group makes buildings, houses, parks, etc. out of recycled materials such as old milk cartons, cereal boxes, cardboard, etc.

Downloads:

Activity 2 (DOC)
Activity 2 (PDF)
Turf Maps

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3 Communities and Town Histories


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills, Geography

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

Geography 3.2.2: Understands the cultural universals of place, time, family life, economics, communication, arts, recreation, food, clothing, shelter, transportation, government, and education.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students learn what makes up a community and how communities are alike and different. They learn the differences between villages, towns, cities and suburbs.  Students learn various ways to find out more about a town’s history, including street signs, town names, objects, maps, houses and buildings.  They use the development of Issaquah as an example of how a community begins and grows, changing and adapting with the times.

Materials: list of field trip destinations

Procedure:

In the classroom:

  1. As a class, brainstorm what makes a community. All communities have… places to live, work, learn, and play
  2. Discuss how big a community can be… village, town, city, suburb, in rural or urban settings.
  3. Review what all communities have and what sizes they can be.
  4. Discuss how we can find information about our town’s history. Suggestions may include; reading books, going to the local museum, asking a librarian, asking people who have lived here for a long time, maps, terrain features, street names, town names, neighborhoods, houses, buildings, objects, photos, newspapers, journals, diaries, roadways, disasters, etc.
  5. Explain that in this unit, students will be using many of these strategies to learn more about their town’s history. They will be using the development of Issaquah as an example of how a community begins and grows, changing and adapting with the times.

On the field trip:

  1. Go on a scavenger hunt on a walking tour of downtown Issaquah looking for evidence of mountains, streams, railroads, coal, old houses and buildings, old neighborhoods, buildings where the bottom half has changed, but the top half hasn’t, old street names, etc.
  2. Take a field trip to the Issaquah History Museums, including the Gilman Town Hall and the Issaquah Depot Museum.  Learn about the buildings themselves, and their place in Issaquah’s history, and about their contents.
  3. Take a field trip to the Museum of History and Industry for logging displays.
  4. Take a field trip to Newcastle Regional Park for coal mining (some mine openings are still visible today).
  5. Possible assessments include; diorama, mural, poster, bulletin board, model, etc., that shows understanding/knowledge of the forces that may contribute to the making of a community.

Downloads:

Activity 3 (DOC)
Activity 3 (PDF)

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4 What do your students know?


Competencies: Social Studies, History, Social Studies Skills

History 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

Social Studies Skills 5.2.2: Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from visuals and literary, narrative, informational, and expository texts.


 

Objective: Students have an opportunity to share what they already know about the history of their local community, and then brainstorm what they would like to find out about the history of their community.

Materials: vocabulary list, mounted photos of the early Issaquah area

Procedure:

  1. Review with students in an informal discussion what they already know about the history of the area.
  2. The vocabulary list could be used as a springboard for discussion.
  3. Another option is to hold up some of the mounted photos and play an inquiry game, letting students share what they notice in the photos.
  4. Keep a K.W.L. chart, recording in three columns what children “Know,” “Want to know,” and at the end of the unit, what students have “Learned.”

Extensions:

  1. To continue practice with the vocabulary words, use the words as a spelling list one week or have students try to unscramble the words.
  2. On the board, list all of the ways in which students have learned about the history of their community (parents, museums, newspapers, photos, etc.).

Downloads:

Activity 4 (DOC)
Activity 4 (PDF)
Vocabulary List
Photographs (PPT) 

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5 Be a History Mystery Detective


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

CBA: Meeting Needs and Wants


 

Objective: Students brainstorm all of the resources we have to learn about the past: photos, letters, journals, memoirs, newspapers, interviews, people, official records, artifacts, objects, etc.  They discover how we learn about the past, specifically through asking questions and thinking about clues in artifacts.

Materials: buttonhook and pair of child’s shoes, wool cards or lucet with yarn, butter press, Edison record, shaving brush, pair of stocking shapers/stretchers/dryers (in Kit 1 only), and old newspaper

Procedure:

  1. Brainstorm all of the resources we have to learn about the past (photos, buildings, structures, letters, journals, memoirs, interviews, people, official records, artifacts, objects, etc.).
  2. Use an inquiry approach to identify a set of artifacts in the kit. Hold up each item and ask students to answer the following questions:
    • What materials is it made from?
    • Where do you think it came from?
    • How was it made?
    • How was it used?
    • Do we still use this? If so, how has it changed? If not, what do we use in place of this?
  3. Discuss how we know life was different and in what ways it was the same, based on these artifacts.

Extensions:

  1. Discuss what objects we use now that in 100 years might be considered antiques or artifacts.
  2. Discuss how photos have changed over the years. Why are some historic photos black and white? Today we can choose to have our photos printed or stored on computer disks.
  3. Can students think of any other clues around their neighborhood that tell about the past (old buildings, old street names, murals on walls that depict scenes from the past, old train or lumber machinery, etc.)?
  4. For the kits containing the lucet (numbers 1, 3, and 5) instead of the wool cards, students can learn how to make sturdy braided cords using this simple wooden tool. Background, pictures, and directions are attached to this activity in those kits.

Downloads:

Activity 5 (DOC)
Activity 5 (PDF)
Lucets
Issaquah Press (selected back issues, 1909-2011)

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6 Photo Study


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.

Social Studies Skills 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.


 

Objective: Using a photo that depicts life in the past in Issaquah, students learn facts about Issaquah’s history.  Then, they use their imagination to write their own story about what is happening in the photos.

Materials: mounted photos in the kit, set of five laminated photos with information printed on the back (or Photo Prompts Slide show)

Procedure:

  1. Share one of the historical, laminated photos with the entire class. Discuss the photo by asking questions such as:
    • Who or what is in the photo?
    • What is in the background?
    • What do you think the people are doing?
    • When do you think the photo was taken? Why?
    • What objects are in the photo?
    • How does the photo look different from photos taken now?
    • Do the people look happy? Sad? Tired? Excited? Relaxed?
    • If you could be one of the people in the photo, who would you like to be and why?
  2. Look for details in the photo. What do students notice after looking at the photo more carefully?
  3. Use the information on the back of the photo to discuss the actual answers to many of the questions above. Explain that one way to learn more about history is to study photos that were taken in the past. Explain that there are many clues in photos that show us how people lived in the past.
  4. Share several of the other laminated photos with the class, ask questions, and talk about we know about the photo and what we don’t know.
  5. Discuss how we could learn more about the people and places in the photos:
    • Talk to someone who knew the people in the photo, or who were related to them.
    • Read one of the person’s letters, journals, or diaries if they kept one.
    • Learn about the professions that these people had.
    • Research the history of the places or buildings in the photo.
  6. In small groups, students choose one of the laminated or mounted photos and use their imagination to write a make-believe story about the people in the photo. 7. Students share their stories with the class. Discuss the difference between facts that we know from the photo and imagined things the students made up for their story.

Extensions:

  1. Write a class story about one of the photos, each student adding on one sentence at a time.
  2. Research one of the photos to learn more about it.
  3. Discuss how history could be misinterpreted if we only made guesses based on a photo. Often additional research is required to learn facts about history.

Downloads:

Activity 6 (DOC)
Activity 6 (PDF)
Photo Prompts (PPT)

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7 Native Plant Uses


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.2: Understands human interaction with the environment.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students discover how Native Americans used plants in the Issaquah area to meet their basic needs, and compare that with how these basic needs are met today.

Materials: laminated plant Illustrations, plant identification cards, overhead of correct matches, worksheet on plant uses

Note to Teacher: Students should be reminded that they should never try eating or using a plant for medicinal purposes unless they have an adult with them who knows for certain the plants are safe. Remind students that some plants are poisonous, and sometimes poisonous plants can look almost identical to edible plants. In addition, some plants are safe to eat or use only when prepared in a specific way.

Procedure:

  1. Native Americans met all of their basic needs with the natural materials around them; trees, plants, animals, etc. Explain to students that they will be examining plants and finding what the Native Americans used them for.
  2. Half of the class receives a laminated plant illustration. The other half of the class receives a plant identification card. This card gives a short description of the plant and a description of how the Native Americans used the plant.
  3. Students try to find their match. They need to read the description and study the plants to see if they have a match. Then, they can read how the Native Americans used the plant.
  4. Put the matching answer key up on the Power Point when students have had enough time to find a reasonable match. Some plants are similar in appearance. Some students may need the answer key to find their correct match.
  5. Once students have matched the plant illustration to the plant identification card, students can share with the group the name of their plant and the Native American uses.
  6. Discuss how we meet the same basic needs today. For example, Native Americans used cedar to carve bowls and spoons. Today we buy plastic or metal utensils at the store.
  7. Students use the worksheets to draw a picture of their plant, copy the Native American uses from the card, and draw a picture of how we meet the same basic needs today.
  8. Based on time and student interest, teachers may want students to complete the one worksheet that has “their” plant along with two others, or any number of additional worksheets. There are a total of 15 plants (5 worksheets, 3 plants on each worksheet).

Downloads:

Activity 7 (DOC)
Activity 7 (PDF)
Plant Illustrations
Plant ID Card
List of Correct Matches
Plant Uses

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8 Native American Stories


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography

Geography 3.2: Understands human interaction with the environment.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students listen to several Native American stories about how something in nature came to be.  Then they write their own story about how something in nature came to be.

Materials: stories included in the activity, paper, pencil, crayons or pens to illustrate, laminated blackberry vine

Procedure:

  1. Read one of the Native American stories attached.
  2. Discuss how the Native Americans often used stories to explain how something in nature came to be. Discuss what in natural characteristics are explained in the story just read.
  3. Read another story to the students. Direct them, “While you listen to this story, see if you can tell what the story is explaining in nature.”
  4. Students write their own story that explains how something came to be in nature. Brainstorm ideas such as: how mountains got to be so big, how the sun and moon got into the sky, why the beaver’s tail is flat, why bears have sharp claws, how the turtle got its shell, what causes it to rain, why frogs jump, why bald eagles have white heads, why porcupines have quills, etc.
  5. Students can illustrate their stories and then share the stories with the class.

Extension:

The Native American name for Squak Mountain was tukaiyu-a’ltu which means “Wolf’s house,” and the name for Tiger Mountain was ts’oop-a’ltu, ts’oop meaning “swamp.” Using this information, let students come up with their own stories about the two mountains.

Downloads:

Activity 8 (DOC)
Activity 8 (PDF)
Native Stories (PDF)

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9 Map of Native American Villages and Trails


Competencies: Social Studies, Geography, Social Studies Skills

Geography 3.2.1: Understands how the environment affects cultural groups and how cultural groups affect the environment.

Geography 3.2.2: Understands the cultural universals of place, time, family life, economics, communication, arts, recreation, food, clothing, shelter, transportation, government, and education

Social Studies Skills 5.3.1: Engages in discussions that attempt to answer questions about cultural similarities and differences.

CBA: Humans and the Environment


 

Objective: Students learn about the places that Native Americans lived, traveled, and conducted their daily lives in the Issaquah and Lake Sammamish area.  Students consider solutions to the problems that the Native Americans had to face.  Students also consider how natural landforms, lakes, hills, forests, wetlands, etc. influence Native American settlement and travel.

Materials: teacher copy of the map, six blank maps of new areas

Procedure:

  1. Explain to the students that they are going to try to find solutions to problems that the Native Americans had to face. Present each of the following questions to the class and allow time for them to think about solutions, share in small groups, and share with the entire class their solutions. *Questions and the Native American’s solutions are listed below.
  2. Share the Native Americans’ solutions to each of the problems and compare their solutions to the students’ suggestions. Did the students come up with any of the same solutions?
  3. As you explain the Native Americans’ solutions, point out the villages, trails, and points of interest on the projected map.
  4. After you have shared the Native Americans’ solutions to all of the problems presented, tell the students that they are going to have a chance to create their own map. Tell the students to imagine that they are in a new area and looking for a place to build their houses, hunt and gather food, provide clothing, find ways to travel, and meet all of their basic needs. Where would they build their houses and make their trails? It is important that they know that there is not one right answer, but they may want to consider the reasons why the Native Americans set up their area as they did.
  5. In groups of four, students draw on a map; villages, trails, various points of interest, etc. using the key as a guide.
  6. Students share their final maps with the class and explain why they chose to place each village or trail where they did.

Questions and Native American Solutions:
Where would you build your long houses?
Near the lake because it provides easy access to fishing and hunting –animals come to the lake and streams for fresh water. It is also an open area and safer than the thick woods. Predators like bears and cougars are less likely to attack in an open area. The waterfront also provides easy access to the lake for travel by canoe.

Where would you make your trails?
Native Americans made their footpaths near the lake because the land is flat and easy to traverse. The lake also provides a reference point. It is much easier to get lost in thick woods than if you are traveling around a lake.

Where are the best food supplies?
Native Americans knew when and where to gather food, such as water chestnuts and hazelnuts.

Downloads:

Activity 9 (DOC)
Activity 9 (PDF)
Teacher’s Key & Area Maps

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10 Mary Louie


Competencies: Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Social Studies Skills 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.


 

Objective: Students compare historical information, the age of Native American Mary Louie, and think about why interpretations of her age differ from source to source.

Materials: Three attached articles (” On the shores of Lake Sammamish, Aunt Louie lived, found in This Was Issaquah, page 47; “The People of the Moon,” found in A Hidden Past, page 2; “Mary Louie 1798-1917,” found in Eastside Heritage News), pictures of Mary Louie

Procedure:

  1. Pose the question, “Should we believe everything we read?” “How do we know that what we read or hear is true?” Discuss how newspapers, books and articles are usually reliable resources, but readers should always be careful not to believe something just because it is written down. It is important to find out who has written the information, what that person’s background is (do they know a lot about the subject, do they have biases), and what their purpose was for sharing the information.
  2. Sometimes, even people who are trying to provide reliable information cannot get all of the facts, or they might get what they think are facts but these facts vary. Here is an example of three articles that tried to provide correct information. Read the portions of the articles about Mary Louie that discuss how old she lived to be. (She is reported to have lived to be 115, 120, and 119 years old.) Show the pictures of Mary Louie. Ask students why they think there is a difference between how old the authors thought Mary Louie lived to be. (Maybe they interviewed two different people who each believed something different. Maybe no one actually knew how old she was. In the past, Native Americans did not write down their histories, or write birth certificates, so this information is difficult to find. Mary Louie has passed away so the writers of the articles couldn’t ask her.)
  3. Pose the following questions to the class, “Imagine you are a reporter. If you were asked to write a follow-up article attempting to clarify how old Mary Louie was, where would you start? Who would want to interview? What other resources could you use to find out?”

Downloads:

Activity 10 (DOC)
Activity 10 (PDF)
Supplemental Reading
Mary Louie, Picture A and Picture B.

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